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Why use 2k instead of 1k Clear?

6 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

I've just laid down a 1k Zero paints clear coat on a spoon test & on some gloss black wheels.

it went down a lot easier than the Zero Paints 2K did & without the hassle of mixing in a separate glass jar.

It seemed more forgiving too.

less material required for a reasonable shine.

So I'm wondering, why bother with the 2k???? What's the benefit?

 

Edited by Funkychiken
spelling correction

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Posted

2k ' off the gun ' does dry  smoother  than 1k which usually dries with a characteristic egg shell  finish that is polished to get the same result. 

A real issue I found with 2k is it dries so hard it can be a mission to sand out and polish any imperfections that inevitably  appear when I paint.

Whilst I do have 2k here I find that having grown up with 1k its ease of use, less toxic and being considerably cheaper makes it my  choice.

I can't see any difference in the shine between my 2k and polished 1k paint jobs therefore the only benefit I can see from 2k is it could save some elbow grease if you laid it down perfectly.

" Why bother with 2k " ..... I don't bother with it anymore as it has more negatives than benefits for me.

 

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I don't really see much benefit to using "2K" products on most model work, particularly in the smaller scales.

"2K" does work well for burying decals sometimes though, where a single component lacquer might cause problems.

"2K" is a urethane with a hardener. The hardener is quite toxic, so be sure to use a VERY good respirator if you shoot the stuff.

2K is generally a higher-build product than the typical lacquer clears I favor. 

2K will usually give you a clear that's thick enough to sand and polish aggressively with not much chance of burn-through in two coats (that's all I usually have to shoot on REAL cars).

Lacquer single-component clears may take 5 or more coats to give you the same film thickness.

As Roncla mentioned, 2K products can be very tough to sand and polish after they're completely cured, but they're also very tough and stable. All this means is that they will be a little more chip-resistant, and they tend to hold a gloss longer, with no need to polish again after a year or two.

2K, because it DOES tend to go on thicker, can give a model a "dipped in syrup" look if you aren't careful with film thickness.

Single-component lacquer can produce a beautiful finish that needs very little sanding and polishing, once you develop your skill. The panel below is plain old lacquer clear, not polished or buffed.

Image result for ace-garageguy 50 olds

 

 

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Posted (edited)

I use both, though rarely do I spray a body with 1K. 

Everything above is on the money, but thirty+ years of holding a spray gun in my mitt makes me much more comfortable with 2K. That, and all it takes is that one time when the 1K spray nozzle spits a glob or three of paint or clear and the euphoria of a simple paint job is ruined for me. For me, I just like the fact that with a spray can I'm at the mercy of a 50 cent nozzle while with the mini HVLP I have all the control.

I also dig the fact that when I spray that one over-thinned coat of clear, I'm done except for possibly a speck of dust or two. I've spent years polishing 1:1 scale cars but don't really have much luck polishing 1/25 scale... it's a skill that I haven't quite gotten a handle on. :(

I'm completely envious of some of the paint jobs I see on this forum, especially when I read they're from a spray can like that hood above. 

Edited by restoman

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Posted

I basically use a 1K.  2K is too toxic for my taste and, as mentioned above, can make a model look like dipped in syrup.  Even allowing for scale effect on finishes, a good 1K finish makes a model look more realistic.  

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Posted

I basically use a 1K.  2K is too toxic for my taste and, as mentioned above, can make a model look like dipped in syrup.  Even allowing for scale effect on finishes, a good 1K finish makes a model look more realistic.  

I use both, though rarely do I spray a body with 1K. 

Everything above is on the money, but thirty+ years of holding a spray gun in my mitt makes me much more comfortable with 2K. That, and all it takes is that one time when the 1K spray nozzle spits a glob or three of paint or clear and the euphoria of a simple paint job is ruined for me. For me, I just like the fact that with a spray can I'm at the mercy of a 50 cent nozzle while with the mini HVLP I have all the control.

I also dig the fact that when I spray that one over-thinned coat of clear, I'm done except for possibly a speck of dust or two. I've spent years polishing 1:1 scale cars but don't really have much luck polishing 1/25 scale... it's a skill that I haven't quite gotten a handle on. :(

I'm completely envious of some of the paint jobs I see on this forum, especially when I read they're from a spray can like that hood above. 

I don't really see much benefit to using "2K" products on most model work, particularly in the smaller scales.

"2K" does work well for burying decals sometimes though, where a single component lacquer might cause problems.

"2K" is a urethane with a hardener. The hardener is quite toxic, so be sure to use a VERY good respirator if you shoot the stuff.

2K is generally a higher-build product than the typical lacquer clears I favor. 

2K will usually give you a clear that's thick enough to sand and polish aggressively with not much chance of burn-through in two coats (that's all I usually have to shoot on REAL cars).

Lacquer single-component clears may take 5 or more coats to give you the same film thickness.

As Roncla mentioned, 2K products can be very tough to sand and polish after they're completely cured, but they're also very tough and stable. All this means is that they will be a little more chip-resistant, and they tend to hold a gloss longer, with no need to polish again after a year or two.

2K, because it DOES tend to go on thicker, can give a model a "dipped in syrup" look if you aren't careful with film thickness.

Single-component lacquer can produce a beautiful finish that needs very little sanding and polishing, once you develop your skill. The panel below is plain old lacquer clear, not polished or buffed.

Image result for ace-garageguy 50 olds

 

 

2k ' off the gun ' does dry  smoother  than 1k which usually dries with a characteristic egg shell  finish that is polished to get the same result. 

A real issue I found with 2k is it dries so hard it can be a mission to sand out and polish any imperfections that inevitably  appear when I paint.

Whilst I do have 2k here I find that having grown up with 1k its ease of use, less toxic and being considerably cheaper makes it my  choice.

I can't see any difference in the shine between my 2k and polished 1k paint jobs therefore the only benefit I can see from 2k is it could save some elbow grease if you laid it down perfectly.

" Why bother with 2k " ..... I don't bother with it anymore as it has more negatives than benefits for me.

 

I've just laid down a 1k Zero paints clear coat on a spoon test & on some gloss black wheels.

it went down a lot easier than the Zero Paints 2K did & without the hassle of mixing in a separate glass jar.

It seemed more forgiving too.

less material required for a reasonable shine.

So I'm wondering, why bother with the 2k???? What's the benefit?

 

Thanks all for your knowledge, it's insightful.

 

When I mentioned 1k, it was in reference to a product that digests through an air brush. So I still have that element of control. But I get the picture with the ddifferent thicknesses and ability to polish...

Thanx

 

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