[[Template core/front/global/utilitiesMenu does not exist. This theme may be out of date. Run the support tool in the AdminCP to restore the default theme.]]
Anglia105E

Hooper & Co Diorama

Recommended Posts

Sorry to have to correct you Bruce, but..... The quiff is a hairstyle that combines the 1950s pompadour hairstyle, the 1950s flattop, and sometimes a mohawk. The hairstyle was a staple in the British 'Teddy Boy' movement, but became popular again in Europe in the early 1980s and faced a resurgence in popularity during the 1990s.[1]

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ahh the subtleties of the english language....

In my 56 years of using it, a Quiff has never been a hairstyle..go figure...:lol:

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bruce.... maybe ' quiff ' has one meaning in Canada, and America, and then another different meaning in England? That's entirely possible.

The word quiff originates from the French word ' coiffe ', so I thought with part of Canada being French.... maybe the word would have the same meaning.

It was the Tin Tin character from the old vintage films that came to mind when the word was mentioned. Anyway Bruce, we may both be right......

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And in one of the languages , I forget which, Tintin himself is called Quiff. I think.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Experimenting with different lighting conditions, and also the position of the tree. Attempting to filter the sunlight through the branches and the foliage of the tree, in order to create interesting shadows on the green tarpaulin that is partly covering the wooden crate. Only one of the 100 watt daylight bulbs is being used for most of these shots and the lamp is placed low down, and behind the tree, as though the sun is low in the sky.

David

100_1596.JPG

100_1603.JPG

100_1608.JPG

100_1610.JPG

100_1680.JPG

100_1686.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The shadow of the tree adds another dimension to the photo.  The scooter is a nice touch too. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Gary...... I am working on shadows and reflections, and also searching for that elusive ' golden ' composition! By that I mean the sort of composition that immediately shouts pure genius. It's in there somewhere ( or out there somewhere ).

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well done!  Stick with it. 

Taking a different twist and going back to our writing and  books, this resulted as potential cover art for book 4 in my series which centers around a truck driver.  All items in the pix are from the "great gatsby scene"

 

Edited by olsbooks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, that works as a book cover illustration I think..... it has a kind of fabric-like texture to it.

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Continued with a second photo shoot today...... this time featuring the red London bus, the black taxi cab and the gold Jaguar MK I.

Once again, the single lamp used was low down, and then the lamp was gradually moved closer to the subject. The most interesting shots were shooting into the light, and also those that showed the light from the windows against the backdrop over to the left side of the building.

Lots of experimental stuff going on, with heights, angles, distances, lighting effects, composition and while most shots were done with the camera on blocks and a self timer set, some were also done completely freehand, even with zoom.

David

100_1764.JPG

100_1787.JPG

100_1804.JPG

100_1814.JPG

100_1818.JPG

100_1819.JPG

100_1825.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Third photo shoot, and this one features the 1950 Bedford Duple OB coach . Waiting at the bus stop are two ladies who are making their way to work on a dark December morning. The sun is just coming up and the coach is still showing lights, approaching the end of the night shift. Strange swirls of colour play on the side of the coach, cast by the shadows of the tree's branches and the dramatic light of the new day dawning. Warm comfortable seats and soft interior lights await the first passengers of the morning. The coach driver smiles and welcomes them aboard.

David

100_1836.JPG

100_1847.JPG

100_1865.JPG

100_1873.JPG

100_1882.JPG

100_1896.JPG

100_1899.JPG

100_1901.JPG

100_1920.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The following photographs represent my first attempt at using a wet surface for the street and pavements. Rather than go down the route of using artificial water, I opted to try real water which was brushed liberally onto the road surface. This is what I would call ' Sunshine after the Rain ' and Mr Rivers is looking out of the showroom window, while a gentleman is perusing a nice 1938 Rolls-Royce Phantom III Sedanca de Ville at his leisure.

David

100_2054.JPG

100_2055.JPG

100_2060.JPG

100_2066.JPG

100_2116.JPG

100_2119.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a photo shoot taking place inside the ground floor showroom of Hooper & Co, which is for a feature that is to be published in the Sunday Times Magazine colour supplement......... this is naturally good publicity for the coach builders' portfolio and on this occasion the managing director is keeping well out of the frame, but of course he is maintaining a watchful eye from a discreet distance. 

David

100_2353.JPG

100_2354.JPG

100_2359.JPG

100_2360.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here we have a few photos of ' A Visitor from France '...... there is a French gentleman, Alain Delon, who owns a Rolls-Royce motor car and he is staying in England for a few months while making a film. Later in 1964 Monsieur Delon appears in the film 'The Yellow Rolls-Royce', but this is the year 1958. This gentleman has asked Hooper & Co to arrange transportation of his 1948 Citroen 15.Six Traction Avant from France to England, because he is most impressed with Hooper's quality workmanship. Hooper & Co have enlisted the services of Maurice Watson & Sons general haulage to bring the French motor car to London. The car is in a poor state and requires extensive repairs during Monsieur Delon's stay in this country. While one of the sons travels in the cab of the 1953 Bedford with his father, the other son rides in the Citroen on the back of the lorry, to make sure the car is not stolen while the other two men sleep in the cab.

David

100_2371.JPG

100_2375.JPG

100_2382.JPG

100_2386.JPG

100_2395.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Gary........ the four wooden pallets are 3D printed items, in addition to the pallet for the engine that I scratch built from balsa.

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 1948 Citroen 15.Six Traction Avant has been fully repaired for Hooper's French visitor Monsieur Delon, and the motor car is being brought round to the front of the building so that the owner can be reunited with his old faithful. Monsieur Delon is naturally very pleased to see the Citroen in such good shape once more. All that remains is for the gentleman to settle his bill with the famous coach builder and the refurbished Traction Avant can be loaded onto the Bedford lorry, prior to making it's way to the port of Dover.

David

100_2578.JPG

100_2582.JPG

100_2588.JPG

100_2596.JPG

100_2612.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very handsome build of an iconic car.  Have you mentioned which kit it is based upon?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bet it is the Heller version. I had one that looked a lot like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you Gary and Pat...... Heller manufacture a 1:8 scale kit of the Citroen, and also the 1:24 scale kit, which is the one I have built here. I found it a bit tricky in places, but got there in the end. The reason I am building a few French motor cars is that I already have the Heller Talbot Lago T26 Record Cabriolet, and the next build is a Delahaye 135, also by Heller. Along with a 1:24 Franklin Mint diecast Bentley MK VI Franay Drophead, the idea is to set up an Anglo-French Joint-Venture stand, outside the Hooper & Co building to display the four cars. This is an event which never happened in reality and it is just an idea of mine. The stand will have English and French flags, the three French cars and the one Bentley model. I see this as what might have been a joint venture between Hooper's of London, England and Carrosserie Franay of Paris, France. There is also a Talbot Lago GP car that I have from the same period of automotive excellence which could be added to the display. Work is also going on with a 1933 MG K3 Magnette and 1932 MG F Magna, which is all to do with the famous lady driver Kitty Brunell. These are white metal kits rather than styrene.

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Thank you for the info on the Citroen.  I have a BBurago and it is way big compared to the DS19.  It also lacks the windshield wipers and while the wheels and tires are poseable they are not accurate at all.

100_1210.JPG.3756e3442a8f94ad979662c648a74f38.JPG

Edited by Gramps46
add photo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gary...... I saw a Bburago Citroen 15 on Ebay and I was tempted to buy one at some stage, but I noticed the engine was silver coloured rather than green so I passed on that one. I didn't notice the lack of windshield wipers and I have to say that Heller haven't drilled any holes for the wipers, even though the parts are supplied in the kit. Actually, the wiper arms have ' tabs ' rather than pins, so what they need is a slot as opposed to a hole.

As regards the length of the car...... the Citroen DS19 is 190 inches in length, while the 15.Six is quoted as being 175.2 inches to 195.3 inches in length. There was an extended wheelbase version which had an additional row of seats, so this could explain the 195.3 inches, and this would be slightly longer than the DS19 ?

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now