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66 Chevy - began painting the body today

10 posts in this topic

Posted

I got a new airbrush and started painting my body today. I have to say this is harder than it looks! I’ve never airbrushed paint before and between all of the mixing and ratios, hoping I don’t mess up (which I did a little), it sure is a PITA! But I think it’s going to look awesome when it’s done. I’m using authentic GM 503 color.

760C6301-46EE-42A1-94A2-1AFE7563DFF0.jpeg

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Posted

Nice work for first airbrushing. Keep notes on what works for ratios. It will get easier as you do more.

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Posted (edited)

I actually found using an airbrush to be easier, but I started with ready to spray paint. I didn't have to mix anything.

I like that color, what is it called? I don't know what the GM code is.

Edited by Xingu

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Posted

Nice work for first airbrushing. Keep notes on what works for ratios. It will get easier as you do more.

Thanks! It takes some getting used to, that's for sure. I think I was rushing myself because I was afraid of the paint drying inside the brush too quick before I was done. I'm doing a wet sand to smooth it out next and then going to go over it again. My dad sent me the materials and wrote the ratios for me (paint to hardener to reducer) told me to start with the basic ratio of reducer then thin it a little at a time until I found what the brush liked. But I got overwhelmed and wanted to go to fast so I stopped where I was in the photo in case I went too far. I did get some orange peel texture, which is why I'm sanding and going to try again. 

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Posted (edited)

I actually found using an airbrush to be easier, but I started with ready to spray paint. I didn't have to mix anything.

I like that color, what is it called? I don't know what the GM code is.

I am almost regretting using the kind I have to mix, it's taking some getting used to and not being intimidated by it. It's just GM Light Green. My dad owns a body shop (hence the name) and sent me the materials I needed. I asked him if I could get it in a ready-to-use formula because I wanted an accurate color, but unfortunately no. This will end up being better in the end I hope. 

 

 

Edited by BodyShopKid

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Posted

I have been using regular automotive paints for my builds for the last 45 years. One thing I do different, though YOUR mileage may vary, is that when painting my models, I do not use hardener. I use acrylic enamels, and I use a medium temp reducer. No hardener. I find that it drys plenty fast, has great gloss, and as it is not exposed to the weather, it retains that level of gloss forever. Hardener just puts another potential wrinkle into the mix, and as most hardeners are toxic to breathe, since I am spraying in my cellar, I don't want to introduce that into my house. When I ran my bodyshop years ago, of course we used hardeners, but for the little stuff, I have found it is not needed at all. If I want a lesser degree of gloss, I use a flattening agent along with the reducer. I also have never used any particular ratios for reducer to paint, as you will find after time that you just know what viscosity will spray right, and it is always easy to add just a drop or two more as needed. Enjoy the airbrush......................it is an awesome addition to any modelers tool box!

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Posted (edited)

I have been using regular automotive paints for my builds for the last 45 years. One thing I do different, though YOUR mileage may vary, is that when painting my models, I do not use hardener. I use acrylic enamels, and I use a medium temp reducer. No hardener. I find that it drys plenty fast, has great gloss, and as it is not exposed to the weather, it retains that level of gloss forever. Hardener just puts another potential wrinkle into the mix, and as most hardeners are toxic to breathe, since I am spraying in my cellar, I don't want to introduce that into my house. When I ran my bodyshop years ago, of course we used hardeners, but for the little stuff, I have found it is not needed at all. If I want a lesser degree of gloss, I use a flattening agent along with the reducer. I also have never used any particular ratios for reducer to paint, as you will find after time that you just know what viscosity will spray right, and it is always easy to add just a drop or two more as needed. Enjoy the airbrush......................it is an awesome addition to any modelers tool box!

Thanks so much! The paint my dad sent me is Limco Supreme. I am going to test out the paint with just the reducer, thanks for the insight! Of course not knowing much about the process and not having experience with the particular paint before, I felt if I didn't use it I might mess up somehow. Thankfully I have been using my husband's super alien-looking two-filter dust mask/respirator he uses when he does woodwork, I had no idea what it smelled like. I was working outside in the front drive with a large cardboard box rig and no wind thankfully! I'm sure I looked funny to my neighbors with the big mask on my face and all of my hair covered under an old tshirt tied around my head, cussing when I dropped something or got tangled up trying to get the hang of using the brush and hoses. 

 

Another quick question -- would it be possible to brush it after it's been thinned out some if I need to do small spots? For example, I'm painting the wheel rims with the same color and I am afraid of getting it too thick and not being able to sand it down. 

Edited by BodyShopKid
added a question

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Posted (edited)

 The paint my dad sent me is Limco Supreme. I am going to test out the paint with just the reducer...

A WORD OF CAUTION:

Tom Decker mentions using acrylic enamel without hardener. Hardener is OPTIONAL in acrylic enamel.

 YOUR paint (Limco Supreme 2K) happens to be acrylic urethane, and hardener is NOT OPTIONAL. It MUST be used for the paint to dry fully.

(I've been in the car body and paint biz, in various capacities from grunt to owner, for almost 50 years).

AND WEAR A RESPIRATOR WHILE USING THIS PRODUCT !!!

Edited by Ace-Garageguy

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Posted

A WORD OF CAUTION:

Tom Decker mentions using acrylic enamel without hardener. Hardener is OPTIONAL in acrylic enamel.

 YOUR paint (Limco Supreme 2K) happens to be acrylic urethane, and hardener is NOT OPTIONAL. It MUST be used for the paint to dry fully.

(I've been in the car body and paint biz, in various capacities from grunt to owner, for almost 50 years).

AND WEAR A RESPIRATOR WHILE USING THIS PRODUCT !!!

Thank you for responding! I'm glad to find this forum and get some input from others with more experience so I don't do something stupid. Well, I might still do stupid stuff, but at least I'll mix my paint right and not breathe in fumes. 

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Posted (edited)

Bill is correct.................know your paint system first. Some systems MUST have all of the components such as hardener, some such as acrylic enamel it is optional. If I were painting a 1:1 project with acrylic enamel, I would use hardener, as it helps preserve the gloss when exposed to the elements. However, for a model build, there are likely few elements it will get exposed to, and deleting the hardener, makes it easier to get to the scale finish I desire, not the super shiny finish some want.

I have also found that once the paint is reduced, it is usually quite difficult to do a tiny spot touch up. I don't reduce my paint if trying to touch up a nick or other tiny flaw, but again, it depends upon the system being used and the nature of the flaw being touched up. Bear in mind also, that a LOT of what you do depends upon the actual model being built as regards the finish desired. I seldom build cars, as my main interest is trucks and equipment. Because of that, I am not looking for the mile deep gloss paint job. Not using hardener helps replicate a much more "scale" finish than otherwise. Trucks and such can have a show quality paint job, but that is not what I aim for. I even often reduce the paint with a flattening agent, which gives it a much more realistic finish for the results I am seeking in my truck builds. If you are looking for a super glossy mile deep finish, look at the posts from Bill...............he has shared much info at acquiring those results, and you won't be disappointed!

And yes, ALWAYS wear a respirator, even if not using hardener. The fumes can mess you up, and with most hardeners, there are very evil compounds such as isocyanates involved that can have a cumulative effect on you, and ruin your life.

Edited by redneckrigger

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