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Duplicolor paint

25 posts in this topic

Posted

I think I've noticed other modelers using Duplicolor paint.  Is it laquer? Does it result in orange-peel?  I noticed a display in the hardware store and it sure comes in a lot of colors; and for cheap!  What can you tell me?

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Posted (edited)

Dupilcolor paint sold in the auto-parts stores is intended for touchup work on real cars, and as such, is formulated with solvents that are often too "hot" for use on model-car plastic. A good primer is essential, and several threads have been written on that.

Once you learn to handle the stuff, it works beautifully.

Edited by Ace-Garageguy

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Posted

On top of the "hot" factor, many times the metallic particles in the paint can be far too large for 1/25th scale.

But a lot of guys like it.

I use plenty of Duplicolor paints on my builds, but I usually refrain from using metallics.

Solid colors, primers & clears all work very well for me.

You are almost guaranteed some orange peel with lacquer paints, but that's where polishing comes in.

 

This '60 Merc was painted using Duplicolor products almost exclusively & polished.

 

Steve

 

 

DSCN3173

 

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Posted

One way to avoid, or lessen the orange peel is to spray closer and faster.

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Posted

Warming the spray can for awhile in warm water will help the paint flow better and lessen the orange peel.

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Posted

I LOVE DupliColor products! It's pretty much all I'll use for bodies. I have my technique down to where I can get nice slick paint with it..........

This is all DupliColor, primer, color, and clear......

48ford_body_001.thumb.JPG.0d399a368ae06e

 

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Posted

On top of the "hot" factor, many times the metallic particles in the paint can be far too large for 1/25th scale.

 

Steve makes an excellent point.

When you go paint-shopping, look for colors labeled "mica" or "pearl". You'll find they usually have finer metallic flake particles than colors labeled "metallic" in the name.

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Posted

Steve makes an excellent point.

When you go paint-shopping, look for colors labeled "mica" or "pearl". You'll find they usually have finer metallic flake particles than colors labeled "metallic" in the name.

Hi,

OOOOO great point.

Thank you sir.

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Posted

One way to avoid, or lessen the orange peel is to spray closer and faster.

True, but you need to be careful that your primer base is sufficient to handle heavy coats of lacquer.

The heavier the coat, the more likely that it will penetrate through the primer to the plastic & then it's "craze city"! ;)

 

Warming the spray can for awhile in warm water will help the paint flow better and lessen the orange peel.

Excellent tip!

I do this when using any paint in an aerosol can.

 

Steve

 

 

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Posted

True, but you need to be careful that your primer base is sufficient to handle heavy coats of lacquer.

The heavier the coat, the more likely that it will penetrate through the primer to the plastic & then it's "craze city"! ;)

 

Excellent tip!

I do this when using any paint in an aerosol can.

 

Steve

 

 

I do this also when I paint, and I've never had a problem spraying Dupli-Color paints. I've been using Tamiya primer over the last several years and it seems to work great whether I use Dupli-Color, Testors, Black Gold, MCW, or Tamiya color coats and clears.

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Posted

I almost always use auto touch up paint by Duplicolor. I get better results with those vs hobby enamels.

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Posted

One question and one comment. 

COMMENT: Just to be sure everyone understands the idea of using warm water: DO NOT place the can of paint into a pan of boiling water on a stove.  Use either hot tap water or very hot water off the stove.

QUESTION:  I have been trying to use a Duplicolor red and can not get a decent paint job.  It looks too thick and almost toyish.  I have tried different distances, speeds, and angles, any other suggestions?

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Posted (edited)

 

QUESTION:  I have been trying to use a Duplicolor red and can not get a decent paint job.  It looks too thick and almost toyish.  I have tried different distances, speeds, and angles, any other suggestions?

Hmmmmm....Because Duplicolor usually sprays so nice, I would tend to think that you just might have a bad batch if you're having that much of a problem.

I'm sure it's possible that the paint viscosity was a little too high before it was packaged. Probably not very likely, but probably possible.

If that's the case, your only option for finding out for certain, and getting a decent job from that can, will be to decant it, thin it properly, and airbrush.

And if it IS a bad batch, it won't just be that one can...but all of them that were filled at the same time.

What's the color name and number?

Another thought is that the spray-can nozzle might be the wrong one. I do not KNOW this for certain, but it would make sense for paint nozzles to have smaller holes than primer nozzles (this is true with real spray guns). You might try swapping nozzles from a can of a different color that sprays well.

Edited by Ace-Garageguy

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Posted

I use it all the time with nice results. I don't shoot for super slick jobs . But I'm happy with them.

 

All these are Duplicolor shot straight from the can. But usually use either U-POL urethane clear or Testors wet look clear

20170309_083643.thumb.jpg.066e79cd602bfb20170314_115742_Richtone(HDR).thumb.jpg.20170310_075926.thumb.jpg.65d2ef946c1dcf20170301_114325.thumb.jpg.af02832bef5102OBH5.thumb.JPG.3f85b6f4f28a1dd705c8ce79cDSC00884.thumb.JPG.ffbf5c27dca0c9ae1608e4a.thumb.jpg.99bbca41fd6e415a606c3af06e9post-9887-0-99652200-1430080105_thumb.jp

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Posted

QUESTION:  I have been trying to use a Duplicolor red and can not get a decent paint job.  It looks too thick and almost toyish.  I have tried different distances, speeds, and angles, any other suggestions?

My guess would be that you got some bad paint.

There are a lot of different Duplicolor reds.

I've used a couple of bright reds with no issues.

My '62 Chrysler 300 was shot with Duplicolor "BGM0398" "Bright Red" & everything went fine.

 

Steve

 

DSCN5813

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Posted

When polishing out orange-peel laquer, I was thiinking of using automotive rubbing compound.  I've had alot of trouble with Tamiya spray can laquer orange peel, so much so that I am presently avoiding it and using acrylic.  

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Posted

When polishing out orange-peel laquer, I was thiinking of using automotive rubbing compound.  I've had alot of trouble with Tamiya spray can laquer orange peel, so much so that I am presently avoiding it and using acrylic.  

Three things:

1) Practice your spray technique more. Once you get it right, you won't have much orange peel at all. This green is as-shot...neither sanded nor polished, but almost NO orange peel.

Image result for ace-garageguy 50 oldsmobile

2) If you DO get orange peel, it's MUCH more effective to sand it flat ("color sanding") prior to polishing. Polishing orange peel without sanding it flat only gives you shiny orange peel.

3) If you get orange peel in metallic colors, you MAY have to spray an additional coat to even the flakes out AFTER you sand it, and prior to clear coating.

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Posted

My guess would be that you got some bad paint.

There are a lot of different Duplicolor reds.

I've used a couple of bright reds with no issues.

My '62 Chrysler 300 was shot with Duplicolor "BGM0398" "Bright Red" & everything went fine.

 

Steve

 

DSCN5813

OMG, that car is hideous. You need to pack that up and send it to me . Im such a nice guy I'll send you a nice clean builder in trade so you can try again

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Posted

OMG, that car is hideous. You need to pack that up and send it to me . Im such a nice guy I'll send you a nice clean builder in trade so you can try again

I would love to Bill, but it took me about 40 years to finally get a '62 Chrysler built!

I don't think I've got another 40 years to spare. :)

 

Steve

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Posted

QUESTION:  I have been trying to use a Duplicolor red and can not get a decent paint job.  It looks too thick and almost toyish.  I have tried different distances, speeds, and angles, any other suggestions?

Adding to what's already been said, I often find Duplicolor on clearance shelves. One reason they are there is because they're getting too old, propellant pressure is diminished and paint is getting heavy.

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Posted

Adding to what's already been said, I often find Duplicolor on clearance shelves. One reason they are there is because they're getting too old, propellant pressure is diminished and paint is getting heavy.

I don't agree with that as a couple of years ago I pulled out a started kit out of the mothballs and it had some parts already painted. I located the Dupli-Color paint in my "stash" and finally painted the body 17 years later and it came out great.

<a href='http://public.fotki.com/itsagas1320/models/dscn3294.html'><img src='https://media.fotki.com/2v2uiYEJhxAdjKg.jpg' style='border: 1px solid black;'></a><br><a href='http://www.fotki.com' style='font-size:12px; font-family:Verdana; text-decoration:none;'>Hosted on Fotki</a>

 

 

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Posted

Adding to what's already been said, I often find Duplicolor on clearance shelves. One reason they are there is because they're getting too old, propellant pressure is diminished and paint is getting heavy.

More often, the clearance paint is for several-years-old cars, which the owners aren't touching up anymore.

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Posted

I don't agree with that as a couple of years ago I pulled out a started kit out of the mothballs and it had some parts already painted. I located the Dupli-Color paint in my "stash" and finally painted the body 17 years later and it came out great.

I don't disagree at all, I have my own old cans I've had success with. I had one old can of such a great color and coverage I used it all up on several projects. However I can think of another clearance can I had that spat like a hobo.

More often, the clearance paint is for several-years-old cars, which the owners aren't touching up anymore.

True enough. My most common "buyer beware" issue with the clearance cans is half the time the colors have not accurately matched the cap... a mix up? I have a can with a lovely teal cap but the paint is a lovely rich blue. I still love the color and have used it for two projects, it's just not what was advertised. But for a buck a can, I'm willing to roll the dice and see what the prize inside is.

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Posted

I don't disagree at all, I have my own old cans I've had success with. I had one old can of such a great color and coverage I used it all up on several projects. However I can think of another clearance can I had that spat like a hobo.

You're not imagining it.

I had about a dozen cans of the old Duplicolor touch up paint, in the old skinny cans from probably 20 years ago, left in my stash when I moved.

I checked a few, & while some seemed fine, others were completely messed up.

From spraying a stream of snot, to chunks in the paint.

Those of course, were the ones that hadn't lost all of their propellant.

 

Steve

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Posted

IF paint isn't properly mixed, it may clog the openings.   SHAKE properly.  THe pigments and such will clog.  IF it will spray at all, clean the openings with lacquer thinner.  I keep lacquer thinner on spray table in a short fat salsa jar.  I can turn a fat spray can upside down and it will fit in the jar.  DClean as best you can and shake shake shake.  Or use a mixer of some sort.  I use my sawzall with the can taped to the blade til I get some shose clamps.  USE ON LOW SPEEDS!  And make sure can doesn't hit hte foot of the saw.  IT will shake a whole lot better than you can manually.  I brought a can back last weekend by shaking it up and cleaning the can opening and the nozzle.  

I have also seen folks drill or puncture a can and pour the paint out.  Doesn't seem safe to me with my skill set, so I have not tried it.  Lots of unsafe things on the 'net... LOL

 

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