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      Board Status   07/20/2018

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I am looking to buy a Dremel tool. Nothing too fancy, just something with a good speed that can help me with removing trim off the side of plastic kits and other small things like that. I found the 7300 and 7700 on Amazon. Does anybody have experience with these? If so what would you recommend? 

https://www.amazon.com/Dremel-7300-N-MiniMite-4-8-Volt-Two-Speed/dp/B003TU0XFU/ref=sr_1_4?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1513021721&sr=1-4&keywords=dremel+7300

https://www.amazon.com/Dremel-7700-1-15-MultiPro-7-2-Volt/dp/B002BACCDA/ref=sr_1_9?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1513021721&sr=1-9&keywords=dremel+7300

 

And yes, I realize there are other Dremel threads already but they are a bit older and make recommendations for tools that are no longer made. I'm willing to take suggestions for other tools as well for my needs. 

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The 7700 lists spindle speeds of 10.000 and 20,000 RPM. If this is correct, it's just too fast for styrene, and will melt the plastic rather than grind it.

The 7300 lists slower speeds, but is also only a 2-speed tool...6,500 and 13,000 RPM.

I personally favor a unit with infinitely adjustable speeds, from just-barely to flat-out.

This unit gives you 5,000-35,000 RPM, with no steps between.

https://www.dremel.com/en_US/products/-/show-product/tools/4000-high-performance-rotary-tool

 

Edited by Ace-Garageguy

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Just now, Ace-Garageguy said:

The 7700 lists spindle speeds of 10.000 and 20,000 RPM. If this is correct, it's just too fast for styrene, and will melt the plastic rather than grind it.

The 7300 lists slower speeds, but is also only a 2-speed tool.

I personally favor a unit with infinitely adjustable speeds, from just-barely to flat-out.

This unit gives you 5,000-35,000 RPM, with no steps between.

https://www.dremel.com/en_US/products/-/show-product/tools/4000-high-performance-rotary-tool

 

^^^This. Exactly what I was going to say. 

Also, I've never needed a Dremel to remove "trim" from a plastic kit. It's handled better, easier, and faster with hand tools. I've had a Dremel for over 30 years and have used it for modeling stuff maybe three times. And two of those were on model airplanes. 

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9 minutes ago, Snake45 said:

Also, I've never needed a Dremel to remove "trim" from a plastic kit. It's handled better, easier, and faster with hand tools. I've had a Dremel for over 30 years and have used it for modeling stuff maybe three times. 

Agreed entirely about hand tools being the better choice for most styrene work.

If you're working with resin, or mixed-media kits with metal parts as well, the Dremel is far more useful.

"Bout the only thing I use mine for (on plastic kits) is very rough cuts with the cutoff-wheels, for HEAVY modifications, and lighter cuts with the sanding drums when matching scratchbuilt parts side-to-side.

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If you're looking for a cordless tool, the Dremel 8050 Micro is a nice choice. It's lightweight and variable speed (5-28000 rpm). Lowes has it for 79 bucks. I have one and it's great. 

Dremel Micro 18-Piece Variable Speed Multipurpose Rotary Tool Kit

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A few years ago I removed the side molding trim of a plastic car body using a friend's dremel  tool and I remember it being fairly painless. Certainly easier than using an X acto knife.  That's why since then I've had the curiosity. But I appreciate the feedback fellas. 

Edited by av405

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33 minutes ago, av405 said:

A few years ago I removed the side molding trim of a plastic car body using a friend's dremel  tool and I remember it being fairly painless. Certainly easier than using an X acto knife.  That's why since then I've had the curiosity. But I appreciate the feedback fellas. 

That would certainly be one good application for a drum sander on a Dremel, definitely.

The only downside is that it's easy to slip and gouge something like that. If you didn't, you're obviously more skilled than many.

I'd still probably use a coarse flat file to start, and finish up with finer cuts. 

That way, you get it dead straight...but it's a matter of personal preference.

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1 hour ago, SfanGoch said:

If you're looking for a cordless tool, the Dremel 8050 Micro is a nice choice. It's lightweight and variable speed (5-28000 rpm). Lowes has it for 79 bucks. I have one and it's great. 

I probably ought to get one of those.

I'm still using an old corded dinosaur I've rebuilt once already. Works great, but the cord is a kinda PITA sometimes.

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22 minutes ago, Ace-Garageguy said:

I probably ought to get one of those.

I'm still using an old corded dinosaur I've rebuilt once already. Works great, but the cord is a kinda PITA sometimes.

Yeah, I have a nonamo brand variable speed w/flexshaft attachment and 100 accessories I picked up about ten years ago from Internet Hobbies for 39 bucks. It does the job; but, between the limited flex of the flexshaft and the power cord getting in the way, cordless is soooooooooooo much more convenient.

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I use the cutoff disks on mine to cut hardened music wire to length for old-school model axles. Much faster than a hacksaw. I also use it to grind out the rear fuselage of tricycle-gear model airplanes, so I can get by with less landing-gear-straining lead weight in the nose (best case, none at all), but I can't recall EVER using it for any kind of plastic model car bodywork. (I did use it to grind out the inside of the roof of a diecast '68 Chevelle, but that's a long story.)

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20 minutes ago, Ace-Garageguy said:

I probably ought to get one of those.

I'm still using an old corded dinosaur I've rebuilt once already. Works great, but the cord is a kinda PITA sometimes.

  I agree completely Bill.....I have an old corded dremel single speed, had to refresh it, but still going.  I use an old sewing machine foot pedal to control speed from crawl to full.  Used for major removal or stirring old paint....GOTTA find an old jigsaw yet.

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Yeah, they have their uses. This poor thing had about a half tube of glue inside the hood, holding it to the body and radiator shell...

DSCN1100.jpg

...but not for long...

DSCN1102.jpg

 

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I am using a single speed Black and Decker flexshaft unit. The main motor unit is mounted under my workbench and the flexshaft is placed over the top of it.  I have mine plugged into an outlet with a rheostat to control voltage going to the motor, gives me unlimited speed availability.  I was told by a "professional modeler" on another now long-defunct forum the motor would burn out quickly using the rheostat.  It has worked fine for at least  the past 18 years.  I do use it for rough grinding  side trim, but mainly for hogging out wheelwells on circle track racers.  I am trying to devise some way to mount the hand unit so I can use it as a cheap mini-lathe. 

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1 hour ago, Ace-Garageguy said:

That would certainly be one good application for a drum sander on a Dremel, definitely.

The only downside is that it's easy to slip and gouge something like that. If you didn't, you're obviously more skilled than many.

I'd still probably use a coarse flat file to start, and finish up with finer cuts. 

That way, you get it dead straight...but it's a matter of personal preference.

I've slipped up with the X actos too. Not something hard to fix but annoying nonetheless.

I like your coarse flat file idea. Any suggestions on size? Or just what one would look like for modeling applications?

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3 hours ago, SfanGoch said:

If you're looking for a cordless tool, the Dremel 8050 Micro is a nice choice. It's lightweight and variable speed (5-28000 rpm). Lowes has it for 79 bucks. I have one and it's great. 

Dremel Micro 18-Piece Variable Speed Multipurpose Rotary Tool Kit

I have the same one.

I love it!

I almost never use any of the sanding wheels.

I mostly use the cutting wheel for cutting metal wire & tubing.

But I use the reamer bits on plastic all of the time for rough cutting.

I still use files & sand paper for fine work.

I use it extensively for things like removing screw posts on old annuals, drilling out headlight buckets, & just generally thinning out anything that needs it.

If you're careful & select the correct bits & tool speed, it will work for all sort of things.

I think one of these is almost indispensable if you're working with resin!

 

 

Steve

Edited by StevenGuthmiller

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11 hours ago, StevenGuthmiller said:

I think one of these is almost indispensable if you're working with resin!

That it is, Steve. Over at Armorama, one of the guys was looking into a tool for cutting off those large plugs usually found on resin AM parts for armor kits. There were people telling him that a handsaw, or sandpaper and water are preferable because there'll be less resin dust created. Not really. Using a handsaw creates the same amount of particles and it's more time consuming. Solution: 

Construct a cutting box 12Lx12Hx24W with a hinged lid on top out of 1/16" plexiglass.

grindbox.jpg.d61a1a17a36a4f07c2438b39abf8e99f.jpg

Cut two holes on the front panel large enough to stick your hands through. This will allow you to manipulate the tool and part inside the box. Whatever dust created by cutting/grinding will remain in the box. After you're done, clean out the box using a vacuum cleaner. You can get a 1/16" 36"x48"  plexiglass sheet at a plastic distributor for 30-40 bucks.

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I keep a Dremel 7300 with a universal chuck on it right at my bench.  I use to drill small holes for ignition wire and fuel lines.  On my bigger bench I have a Dremel Stylus also with a universal chuck used for grinding/cutting plastic and putty.

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1 hour ago, SfanGoch said:

That it is, Steve. Over at Armorama, one of the guys was looking into a tool for cutting off those large plugs usually found on resin AM parts for armor kits. There were people telling him that a handsaw, or sandpaper and water are preferable because there'll be less resin dust created. Not really. Using a handsaw creates the same amount of particles and it's more time consuming. Solution: 

Construct a cutting box 12Lx12Hx24W with a hinged lid on top out of 1/16" plexiglass.

grindbox.jpg.d61a1a17a36a4f07c2438b39abf8e99f.jpg

Cut two holes on the front panel large enough to stick your hands through. This will allow you to manipulate the tool and part inside the box. Whatever dust created by cutting/grinding will remain in the box. After you're done, clean out the box using a vacuum cleaner. You can get a 1/16" 36"x48"  plexiglass sheet at a plastic distributor for 30-40 bucks.

Why not cut a hole in the rear panel and connect the hose from a shop vac? You might need to drill a few holes to allow air to enter the box, otherwise you could end up with a vacuum inside the box.

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Sure, you can modify the design to fit your requirements. Here's the hitch to using a shop vac. Not everyone lives in a house with a garage or basement to deck out as hobby workspace.This was designed with apartment dwellers as primary users in mind because space is at a premium and a shop vac isn't something normally found in an apartment unless one is emulating the Collyer Brothers and hoards useless junk. Other types of exhaust systems which require an exhaust fan and running a hose through a window adapter are, likewise, impractical  because, if one lives in a recently constructed building around these parts, you're more than likely to have large, horizontally sliding windows which are 48' tall. That leaves a pretty friggin' big vertical gap to fill with a mounting plate for the hose and building management would have a s**tfit seeing something like that. Almost everyone living in an apartment owns a vacuum cleaner. So, it's easy enough to stick the nozzle attachment inside the box and clean up the resin dust and pieces

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14 minutes ago, SfanGoch said:

...unless one is emulating the Collyer Brothers and hoards useless junk...

I prefer to think of it as stockpiling materials and components for repurposing ...   ;)

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That's what them zany Collyer Brothers might have been thinking. The stuffed over 100 tons of materials and components into a three story brownstone. One of the more interesting items found was a Model T frame. 

image.jpeg.a5033057433416406023321f10b27d42.jpeg

How'd they get it through the door and hallway?!? Brownstone hallways are notoriously narrow once you get past the foyer, the staircase takes up over one half the width of the first floor hall.  It couldn't have been brought in through the door under the stoop because  there's no space to maneuver it. Absolute geniuses!!!!!!!

Edited by SfanGoch

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20 minutes ago, SfanGoch said:

That's what them zany Collyer Brothers might have been thinking. 

Fascinating read. How's the old saying go...something like "it's better to have a model T frame and not need it, than to need one and not have it"...? 

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I personally stay away from cordless. I also stay away from HF, chuck parts won't interchange with Dremel/Craftsmen and you are stuck with only being able to use 1/8th shank tools. 

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16 hours ago, av405 said:

I like your coarse flat file idea. Any suggestions on size? Or just what one would look like for modeling applications?

I've picked up several sets of small files over the years, mostly things I've seen at hobby shops that were different from what else I already had.

Sometimes you get lucky and find a set that has coarse and fine teeth on the same file, but usually not.

In general, the metal in the Japanese ones is harder than what's in the Chinese ones, which matters if you're working with metal.

This is a typical decent quality set.

Image result for small file set

 

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8 minutes ago, Ace-Garageguy said:

In general, the metal in the Japanese ones is harder than what's in the Chinese ones, which matters if you're working with metal.

I found that out the hard way. I used a steel brush to clean out the junk buildup after filing some soft metal with a cheap Chinese-made file. The junk was gone. So were the teeth on the file.

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