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    • Dave Ambrose

      Board Status   07/20/2018

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PorkChopPaws

Why are realtors nonchalant ?

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The wife decided she is going to retire next year so I was ordered to find us a nice retirement place back in Pa where all her kids and grand-kids live.She had planned on continuing to work but after 12 years of fighting with the VA much to their chagrin I didn't die and I finally won my claim and we had a small windfall.So I have been looking around ,getting pre-qualified etc.She decided we should use this realtor her daughter knows.So he finally gets off his duff and takes the daughter to a couple places over the weekend and she sends us about 50 pics of each.One was a dump and the other was nice but too small.We also have horses and need at least 5 acres. Both of them got a little ticked with us when we said no but this is going to be our last move and I'm not about to be pushed into something .I made it plain if I see one that really is what we want I will  go back there and buy it after I check it out.

.So today I was looking around and found a seemingly perfect place and I called the realtor.We had never talked so he was surprised to hear from me I guess because he mentioned he thought the daughter was handling this. What? So I told him about it and turns out he's the realtor on this piece . He then mentioned he had some pics of the place on his phone as there were only a few online.He said he would forward them to me and we hung up. So I waited .After 4 hours I texted him and he replied that "he was now driving and that he hadn't gotten around to looking for them. "   What the frig? Now it's the end of the day and still nothing.

Edited by PorkChopPaws

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I've had similar experiences, most recently while looking for a house with land and a large shop in Az.

One was just lazy, apparently. I guess she gets paid enough on a few easy sales that she doesn't feel the need to put out much effort on the rest.

I met one who actually said that maybe levels hadn't been invented yet when I commented on the fact that there wasn't a square corner or plumb line anywhere on a house built in 1969.

Another one just didn't seem to understand that I had very specific needs, and wasn't going to buy something that wasn't at least 95% suitable. Period.

And I don't think it's just realtors. Lotsa people don't try to do what they do WELL.

Returning calls and emails often seems to be too much bother, and in general, I'm usually at least mildly disappointed with almost everyone I do business with.

A competent, courteous professional is getting to be a rarity.

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You know Bill I have almost come to the same conclusion. I guess being an old guy I expect certain things like courtesy,punctuality and effort. I find myself saying to myself" I'd like to see this turd do my job when I worked". I worked blue collar my whole life but I always tried to do my best.    

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I was lucky to find a good realtor here in NE Ohio last year when I was planning to move back here from Arizona.  I had spent a lot of time on Trulia, Zillow, Redfin, realtor.com, etc researching various cities, suburbs and neighborhoods, dozens of specific houses for sale..had a good idea what I was looking for and my price range.  She was very good about returning calls, communicating w/ texts, doing everything online (I don't like printing things out if not needed).   I flew back a few weekends and she was available on Fridays and Saturdays to drive around and look at houses, she even went and took photos and videos of some houses for me.   

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Not just real estate agents ("realtors" are a specific group, not everyone who sells real estate is a realtor).  It's insurance agents, car sales people, and others.

-When I still had a mortgage on my house, the agent that handled it would shop the insurance around every year.  So, every two/three years I'd be covered by a different company.  The agent would keep bugging me to insure my cars there too.  So, I gave him info on the two vehicles, one of which is a 1962 car.  He called me back with a quote on my truck only, as if he thought I'd overlook the fact that the car wasn't mentioned.  I told him he forgot something, and not to call me again until he figured out what it was.  He did try again the following year, which triggered a reminder from me.  He never tried again..."oh yeah, that's the guy with the old car...might take a half-hour and a couple of phone calls to get a quote on that one".

-When shopping for a vehicle, I often ran into dealers who flat-out weren't interested in selling me a truck unless it was something sitting on their lot.  Which was, almost always, an overloaded four-wheel-drive extended cab, which was the antithesis of what I wanted.  These were all good-sized dealers, not one-bulb caves with one or two cars on the lot.  And it wasn't at year-end either, as the first three new vehicles I had were all bought in February or March.  I'd tell them what I wanted, and I'd always hear "nobody buys them like that"...then I'd point similar ones out as they were driving by.  The car situation is changing though, mainly because the newer cars don't offer that many choices.  I bought the last one and drove it home the same day.  Only two trim levels, a handful of color choices (only one interior color), and most of the "options" can be had on the car or bought over the parts counter.  Around here, every car in stock gets the winter floor mats and mud flaps (cheaper to get them on the car than to buy them separately, and no messing around putting them on).     

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Last year I went to several car dealers when looking for a truck and told them all that the truck would have to be ordered from the factory. Well all of the dealers insisted on looking at the inventory on the computer and told me it would have to be ordered. DUH, that's what I told them in the first place. I have no use for a 4x4. extended cab, long bed, or V-8 engine anymore or any of the colors they had sitting on the lot either. I finally ordered it and got what I wanted. Of course the dealer surprised me by not offering to outfit my truck for me which would have been more dollars in their pockets, but I had a truck outfitter that I've used before. I now drive the truck I wanted as it'll probably be my last truck purchase anyway.

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Being in sales for the last 22 years has taught me a lot about customer service and how successful one can be just doing the basics. I learned that if you tell a customer you will call/visit/deliver on a certain day or date, then do it! If there is a reason why you can't, let them know AS SOON AS YOU KNOW, because anything less is being deceitful. 

I follow up each visit with my customers with a detailed call report outlining the items that I need to address as well as the ones they need to address. This makes it much easier to remember what work is ahead for me and them, and if for some reason they "forget", I can politely remind them by bringing out the call report.

We bought a car back in September and it reminded me why I don't go through that exercise but every 6-8 years or so. The salesman was a nice enough guy (relatively new and eager)but had to remind him several times of items that were promised but not delivered at the time we bought the car. I was nice but firm that if could promise me certain things to sell me the car, then he better remember to do as he said. He did come through in the end and has called several times asking how we are liking our car and I remind him that customer service will set him apart from the others.

My personal experience with realtors runs the gamut from the worst to the best. Again, the better ones are more friendly, communicate with their clients and truly listen to their needs and wants opposed to showing them what ever.

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I hear you guys on the realtor thing.Almost 5 years ago when we moved to Indiana we had 2 realtors.The first one was gone shortly.She didn't do her homework first.She shows us a house that we liked and wanted and she tells us it's sold-why show us.The second was cool and showed us a house we fell in love with.Almost 5 years later and I  love my house.Built in 1899 with all all original hardwood.I call it 'LITTLE HOUSE ON THE PRAIRIE.

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Four days and still no pics from the realtor....and this is with being a friend of my step-daughter. This is why I told the wife I don't want family to "help". ....it seldom works out.

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Get another realtor from the area to start helping you. When the first one finally sends photos, tell them you got tired of waiting and found someone else to help you.

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As someone in sales, success is really quite simple. It's a cliche, but say what you do, then do what you say.

And don't be afraid to say no. I have so many clients that I've turned down on occasion because what they wanted at the time and what I could offer just didn't fit. Too many sales people feel they have to close the deal. Not so. I'm in charge now, and I'm constantly asking my team why they're quoting certain vehicles to certain people. "Well, they asked for a quote and we want the business." That may be true, but if it's the wrong fit, or out of their budget, or they're just shopping us, then everyone's time is being wasted.  Customers will appreciate the honesty. And the know-it-all customers will be shocked when you say thanks but no thanks. Puts the sales person back in control of the relationship.

 

 

As for your realtor problem, I'd have found a new guy a long time ago. I give people three attempts. If I try to get info three times, and they're not doing it? Three strikes, you're out. 

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56 minutes ago, iamsuperdan said:

And the know-it-all customers will be shocked when you say thanks but no thanks. Puts the sales person back in control of the relationship.

 

Those pesky "know-it-all customers" are annoying only when they actually do know as much, or, in some instances, more than the salesperson/broker. Some people actually perform research on the things they are considering to buy. This keeps both sides honest.

To quote the late, great Sy Syms:

"An educated consumer is our best customer."

Gotta disagree with the last part of your quoted comment. If I'm shopping around for a car or house,  or anything for that matter, I'm the one who's in charge of the relationship. I hold all the aces by virtue of my willingness to spend my money on something I want and the salesperson is trying to sell.  I tell the salesperson/broker what my requirements are; and, it's his job, if he expects that commision check in his pocket, to accommodate me. If you, as a salesperson, can't satisfactorily accommodate my needs/requirements, I'll go elsewhere. Salespeople are experts in understanding human behavior and use psychology to manipulate potential customers to their personal benefit. Too many car salesmen/real estate brokers use the approach that they're doing you a favor by pushing something you're not interested in, or can afford, and that you should be grateful that they're even wasting their valuable time with you in the first place, essentially making the potential buyer feel obligated to complete the deal. They attempt to guilt trip you into a sale because the average prospective mark feels embarrassed to say "NO" so as not to look like a chiseler and, at the same time, offend the friendly, helpful salesperson.

Edited by SfanGoch

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What's really unfortunate is that so much of human interaction apparently has to come down to "who's in control"....the old power struggle BS.

When I go house or car shopping, I know what I want, I won't settle for anything that's TOO far off the mark (but I try to be reasonable in my expectations and not be the whiny baby), and I expect the sales person to LISTEN to me and accommodate what I want to do with MY money.

That's what the sales person is paid for, in my view of things, and if somebody tries to steer me, or push me, of just doesn't listen, I don't play any idiot power games. I walk away, and try somebody else.

That said, after dealing with several lazy morons while looking for out-of-state real estate, I've finally found someone who's bright, energetic, resourceful, knowledgeable, and will jump through as many hoops as necessary to get the job done...to MY satisfaction.

Good people in ANY profession are out there, but they ARE rare...and far too many buyers let themselves be manipulated by not-the-best sales people.

Edited by Ace-Garageguy

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My friend, today is your lucky day. I know it's not exactly what you were looking for; but, this beautiful, unrestored historic wre...residence has plenty of potential for the right person. I might be able to persuade the owner to let you have it for only $3.9 M which, I might add, would mean a personal sacrifice on my commission. I'm only doing this because I like you. Just sign here, here and here.

Related image

 

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The power struggle is real though!

In any negotiation for a product or services, all parties involved want to be in control. THe consumer wants to dictate terms and get what he/she wants, and the seller wants to dictate their terms, informing the consumer what they're willing to give.

As much as one tries to avoid that, i think it's inevitable.

Informed customers are fantastic. However, informed customers that get cocky about it I'll usually walk. The customers that come in and tell me right off the bat that they have researched and know exactly what they want make my job a lot easier. However, it crosses the line when they not only tell me exactly what they want, but they also start talking about how they know what to pay, and they know what I've paid for the vehicle, and they know exactly how muc gross there is, etc, etc; and they won;t pay a penny more. Thank you, but we're done here. Those are the "know-it-all" customers I refer to. I'd rather walk them than try to explain to them why their internet research is wrong, and that reality is a lot more different than they think.

 

 

And I 100% agree with you Bill. Pushy salespeople, or salespeople that do not listen to my needs, will not get my business. 

It's a total cliche, but I want a salesperson that I can trust. This is a relationship, and if everyone listens to each other, and can be reasonable with their demands and expectations, then we're doing business.

 

:)

 

 

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2 minutes ago, SfanGoch said:

My friend, today is your lucky day. I know it's not exactly what you were looking for; but, this beautiful, unrestored historic wre...residence has plenty of potential for the right person. I might be able to persuade the owner to let you have it for only $3.9 M which, I might add, would mean a personal sacrifice on my commission. I'm only doing this because I like you. Just sign here, here and here.

Related image

Rustic waterfront property with huge potential. Lots of open space, open concept main floor.

:P 

2 minutes ago, SfanGoch said:

 

 

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Buy it and you'll be one of the fortunate few to own one of the extremely rare and hard to find homes that George Washington never slept in.

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57 minutes ago, SfanGoch said:

Buy it and you'll be one of the fortunate few to own one of the extremely rare and hard to find homes that George Washington never slept in.

You failed to mention the stunning maritime view, and that the location location location would be perfect for someone in a discreet import business.

Edited by Ace-Garageguy

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1 hour ago, Ace-Garageguy said:

You failed to mention the stunning maritime view, and that the location location location would be perfect for someone in a discreet import business.

Yes, I neglected to mention the 24 under-the-pier mooring slips which make hosting post-regatta soirees a snap.  As an additional bonus, each slip has its own overhead trap door which allows for quick, discreet "cargo" transfers to and from unmarked speed launches. 

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I'll answer the realtor question...

I was involved in real estate and there are two adages:

90% of real estate sales are caused by 10% of the realtors

There are two types of people involved in real estate...  those getting into the business, and those getting out of the business.

Real estate is a revolving door.   The men are mostly career salesmen who have bopped from insurance sales, car sales, mortgage sales and now hope this last move to real estate will work this time.   A lot of women in real estate are  "house wives with business cards".  They may do a friend or family member the disservice of their inexperience.  When I worked for a real estate agency in NJ,  we had a group of women like this.  They'd show up every Tuesday, all dressed up to go to the open houses, attend our weekly meeting and then they'd all go to lunch together.  Then we wouldn't see or hear from them until the next Tuesday.  None of them had deals on the board.

People do not succeed in real estate because it's a self motivated business.  You have to provide your own drive and initiative, nobody is going to push you to work. That's where lazy people can be lazy.

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Just now, Tom Geiger said:

I'll answer the realtor question...

I was involved in real estate and there are two adages:

90% of real estate sales are caused by 10% of the realtors

There are two types of people involved in real estate...  those getting into the business, and those getting out of the business.

Real estate is a revolving door.   The men are mostly career salesmen who have bopped from insurance sales, car sales, mortgage sales and now hope this last move to real estate will work this time.   A lot of women in real estate are  "house wives with business cards".  They may do a friend or family member the disservice of their inexperience occassionally.  When I worked for a real estate agency in NJ,  we had a group of women like this.  They'd show up every Tuesday, all dressed up to go to the open houses, attend our weekly meeting and then they'd all go to lunch together.  Then we wouldn't see or hear from them until the next Tuesday.  None of them had deals on the board.

People do not succeed in real estate because it's a self motivated business.  You have to provide your own drive and initiative, nobody is going to push you to work. That's where lazy people can be lazy.   One of the best salesmen I knew wasn't a smart guy. But he'd show up at 8am every day and hit the phones. His phone pitch was basically,  "Hi I'm John from XYZ Realtors.  Do you want to sell your house?  No, ok thank you".  You'd sit in the office and hear that over and over.  But due to his sheer perseverance  every 50 calls or so he'd get a hit.  And he earned a living.  

 

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3 hours ago, SfanGoch said:

My friend, today is your lucky day. I know it's not exactly what you were looking for; but, this beautiful, unrestored historic wre...residence has plenty of potential for the right person. I might be able to persuade the owner to let you have it for only $3.9 M which, I might add, would mean a personal sacrifice on my commission. I'm only doing this because I like you. Just sign here, here and here.

Related image

 

Around here, the preservationists would be screaming for other peoples' money to restore that...

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1 minute ago, Tom Geiger said:

 

One of my exes was a million-dollar-club member, and of course an FMLS member. She was the queen of schmooze, loved running her mouth, and ALWAYS followed up with clients and potentials because she had a phone-talking addiction similar to the smart-phone junkies of the present. She was particularly adept at selling to men, and we won't go into her extra special incentive program that I only found out about late in our relationship. I bought a house through her, and believed I was special. Nope. 

Anyway, the new one I was waxing poetic about earlier seems to have come down with a case of the brain farts. Let's hope it's only a temporary affliction.

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You've just described nearly every non-male broker at Corcoran and Douglas Elliman. They dress like they're on the prowl and palaver until your will to resist is broken. You end up buying that insanely overpriced shack because you just want them to finally shut the h*ll up before you are forced to step into traffic. 

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