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1/12 1969 Camaro


Cien1986
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12 hours ago, Lowlife ! ! said:

Looks great so far, good job !

Can I mention one little thing ? Not to criticize but if you look at the real engine above it has standard headers with heat shields to protect the HT leads. The 302 in the kit has aftermarket headers , it shows in the instructions to run the HT leads down behind the headers then under them . This would stop them melting  ! !

Just thought I'd mention it , looking forward to more progress on this !

 Hi martin... last night when i try to slot in the engine tomengine bay... the header broke down so i glueing it again then try your suggestion...

But it wont do... because my wire is kinda stiff so its impossible for it to make extreme bend under the exhaust... when it bend it push the exhaust outside and broke the glueing... i think igive up on this one.... though your logic is very true...

Next time i will put more attention on it...

Any way thanks for you to mention it....

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Yes the wires are awkward, don't worry it looks fine as you had it before !

I had trouble too fitting the engine,  I found it easier to slide it in from underneath the car its easier....

The front of your chassis looks good, I made up the front parts from scratch so there's no battery !

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You are doing a great job with this one Henry, and I am only just starting to put some plug lead wires into my Rolls-Royce engine for the first time in one year of scale model car building. Like you are finding, the wires are so small and also they do not bend easily in tight corners. For you in 1:12 scale it is difficult, so maybe I will find working in 1:24 scale even more difficult. The Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud model has the HT leads coming out of the distributor cap horizontally and not vertically, which would have been easier, and then the leads go through protective tubes, three leads on each side before connecting to the six spark plugs. The coil lead has to go to the ignition coil which is mounted in the upside down position ( correct according to Rolls-Royce ). I am studying your setup closely on the '69 Camaro and taking note of your distributor cap and HT leads method of attaching the whole thing. The engine on your build is a tight fit, and this is also very true for the Rolls-Royce engine. Keep posting more photos and work in progress reports on your Camaro because I am following your build with interest.

David

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This spark plug wire routing is interesting. The only thing I can offer is my 1:1 experience with Small Block Chevrolet engines. In the factory form using the Cast Iron Exhaust Manifolds Chevrolet would have the plug wires from the Distributer go along the back side of the head and go between the block and the manifolds running toward the front of the engine. There would be a heat shield on the 283 cu.in. and larger engines that used the center down pipe exhaust to protect the plug wires going to the front two cylinders. I have owned several small block Chevrolets in the past and almost everyone of them would get Headers installed. The routing of the plug wires with the headers would follow the factory method used on the '64 or later model cars with the manifolds that had a down turn in the factory cast iron manifolds at the exhaust port. The OEM heat shields where mounted to the exhaust manifolds and the plug wires would come in over the Valves Covers or were routed thru small brackets that were mounted to the valve covers depending on the application. This same routing was commonly used in an application where headers were used also. Many, including myself, would use the Heat Shields used on Corvette applications that were a wrap around the spark plug and the lead so they wouldn't melt. If plug wires are exposed for prolonged periods of heat over time they will start to short out to the nearest metal surface and often become very brittle and need to be replaced.  I don't know if this will help or confuse you, but the way you are doing it on your model now is about as close as you can get unless you can get some where close to a 90 degree bend where the lead meets the spark plug.  

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10 hours ago, Lowlife ! ! said:

Yes the wires are awkward, don't worry it looks fine as you had it before !

I had trouble too fitting the engine,  I found it easier to slide it in from underneath the car its easier....

The front of your chassis looks good, I made up the front parts from scratch so there's no battery !

Thanks martin...

I never think to slide it in from below... is it really works?

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8 hours ago, espo said:

This spark plug wire routing is interesting. The only thing I can offer is my 1:1 experience with Small Block Chevrolet engines. In the factory form using the Cast Iron Exhaust Manifolds Chevrolet would have the plug wires from the Distributer go along the back side of the head and go between the block and the manifolds running toward the front of the engine. There would be a heat shield on the 283 cu.in. and larger engines that used the center down pipe exhaust to protect the plug wires going to the front two cylinders. I have owned several small block Chevrolets in the past and almost everyone of them would get Headers installed. The routing of the plug wires with the headers would follow the factory method used on the '64 or later model cars with the manifolds that had a down turn in the factory cast iron manifolds at the exhaust port. The OEM heat shields where mounted to the exhaust manifolds and the plug wires would come in over the Valves Covers or were routed thru small brackets that were mounted to the valve covers depending on the application. This same routing was commonly used in an application where headers were used also. Many, including myself, would use the Heat Shields used on Corvette applications that were a wrap around the spark plug and the lead so they wouldn't melt. If plug wires are exposed for prolonged periods of heat over time they will start to short out to the nearest metal surface and often become very brittle and need to be replaced.  I don't know if this will help or confuse you, but the way you are doing it on your model now is about as close as you can get unless you can get some where close to a 90 degree bend where the lead meets the spark plug.  

Thanks for sharing your real car experience david...

Its real important knowledge and fact for me...

Thanks......

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Today i try to dry fit engine and brake master 

To see how the colour blend in....

IMG_20180101_225228.jpg

Since the ht lead is also dry fit....

I will try the heat shield and see how it will turn out....

Edited by Cien1986
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9 hours ago, Anglia105E said:

You are doing a great job with this one Henry, and I am only just starting to put some plug lead wires into my Rolls-Royce engine for the first time in one year of scale model car building. Like you are finding, the wires are so small and also they do not bend easily in tight corners. For you in 1:12 scale it is difficult, so maybe I will find working in 1:24 scale even more difficult. The Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud model has the HT leads coming out of the distributor cap horizontally and not vertically, which would have been easier, and then the leads go through protective tubes, three leads on each side before connecting to the six spark plugs. The coil lead has to go to the ignition coil which is mounted in the upside down position ( correct according to Rolls-Royce ). I am studying your setup closely on the '69 Camaro and taking note of your distributor cap and HT leads method of attaching the whole thing. The engine on your build is a tight fit, and this is also very true for the Rolls-Royce engine. Keep posting more photos and work in progress reports on your Camaro because I am following your build with interest.

David

Thanks for following my build david...

The kit supply me with softer black vinyl wire... but i use standard wire which i cut out from old telephone line... since i like the colour and real wire inside it.... but i had to trade the stifness with appearance....

Maybe 1/24 no need to add real wire to it... sometimes they dont even supply it out of box.... but i see some highly detail kit with plastic molding of wire and clamp cut directly from plastic runner on that scale....

But if you had to add it... you can look the supply at hlj website... hobby link japan...

Or take a look at model factory hiro kit... they are insanely detail for 1/24 out of box...

And... diecast tooo..... hahaha

So maybe you can add their kit to your next diorama later on...

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