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56 minutes ago, Greg Myers said:

What;s a good source ?

 

 

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What are you looking for, PE, resin, machined? Here are some affordable options other than Studio 27 and other more expensive types. 

 

Aber makes a set of PE hexagonal bolts.

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You can check out the PDF assembly  instructions using the link on that page. Aber also has machine turned 1/16 scale 1.6 x 4mm hex nuts & 1.6mm bolts and 1/35 nuts & bolts, any of which can be used for 1/24-1/25.

Armor35.ru carries the full line of Masterclub resin nuts, bolts, rivets and fasteners. That's over 120 types and sizes, more than you'll ever possibly need. Masterclub's resin NBR&Fs are the best on the market and are multiscale. The casting is exquisite and the detail is amazing, even on the smallest ones. A bag of 110-200 pieces (depending on the size) costs $2.63 plus postage (which is really inexpensive). You can find some stateside online dealers carrying a few sets; but, they'll charge anywhere from $6 to $9 for them.

 

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MC435071 Гайка с шайбой, размер под ключ - 0.5ммMC435059  Гайка (ключ 1,4 мм; установочное отверстие 1,0 мм) MC435082 Корончатая гайка (0,7 мм; установочное отверстие 0,5 мм)MC435121 Корончатая гайка с шайбой (0,6 мм; установочное отверстие 0,5 мм)MC435046 Головка болта низкая (ключ 0,9 мм; установочное отверстие 0,6 мм)MC435038 Головка болта (ключ 1,2 мм; установочное отверстие 0,8 мм)MC435026 Заклепка плоская (0,9 мм; установочное отверстие 0,6 мм)MC435019 Заклепка сферическая плоская ( 1,4 мм; установочное отверстие 1,0 мм)

MC435009  Заклепка сферическая (1,4 мм; установочное отверстие 1,0 мм)MC435062 Головка болта на шайбе (ключ 0,6 мм; установочное отверстие 0,6 мм)MC435091 Головка болта пулестойкого (ключ 0,5 мм; установочное отверстие 0,5 мм)

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The MasterClub bolts are by far the best deal I have found. I used to get metal from Scale Hardware or T2M, and while they are nice, sometimes it’s hard to trim off the extra metal. With the MasterClub resin bolts, you can just snip and sand. Plus you get so many, when they inevitably fly from your tweezers, huh, grab another! They are very well cast, don’t have any flash, and I’m not exactly sure how they make them...

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13 minutes ago, Erik Smith said:

The MasterClub bolts are by far the best deal I have found. I used to get metal from Scale Hardware or T2M, and while they are nice, sometimes it’s hard to trim off the extra metal. With the MasterClub resin bolts, you can just snip and sand. Plus you get so many, when they inevitably fly from your tweezers, huh, grab another! They are very well cast, don’t have any flash, and I’m not exactly sure how they make them...

Snip!

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3 minutes ago, chuckyr said:

Snip!

Snip...Fling!!! There goes 50 cents!

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Great Thread. I'm saving this.

 

Model Doctor used to have some, but they are long gone. 

I've been using hex shaped styrene, but getting a straight cut is a challenge. 

I've had good results from Scale Hardware. Especially nice if you want to bolt on certain larger 1/25 scale parts like wheels and such.

 

When trimming PE pieces that like to fly away I back them with masking tape first. Cheap insurance.

 

Edited by Scott Colmer

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MasterClub looks very interesting , I'll have to try some of those .  I've always bought from Scale Hardware which is now owned and sold by Model Motorcars,ltd . They have a lot to choose from and service/shipping is excellent .

Model Motorcars , Ltd . :)

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I have found that, cutting the hex rod , of any diameter, is easier with a chisel blade.

 

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7 hours ago, Scott Colmer said:

Great Thread. I'm saving this.

 

Model Doctor used to have some, but they are long gone. 

I've been using hex shaped styrene, but getting a straight cut is a challenge. 

I've had good results from Scale Hardware. Especially nice if you want to bolt on certain larger 1/25 scale parts like wheels and such.

 

When trimming PE pieces that like to fly away I back them with masking tape first. Cheap insurance.

 

I like the ones from Model Doctor and wish that I had "stocked up" on them. I have a couple left and I'll be stopping at a large model railroad store next week and will see if they can do me any good as far as a bolt like I've been using from the Model Doc.

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What's a good size to look for to make accurate 1/25 scale lug nuts for your average '50s-'70s Detroit car? Like zero point what mm, or inches?

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Using a 3/4" lug nut as an example, a 0.7mm bolt head would work

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On 12/1/2017 at 6:01 PM, misterNNL said:

 

 

On 1/5/2018 at 9:34 PM, High octane said:

I like the ones from Model Doctor and wish that I had "stocked up" on them. I have a couple left and I'll be stopping at a large model railroad store next week and will see if they can do me any good as far as a bolt like I've been using from the Model Doc.

Watch out for those train nuts, some are square instead of hex. 

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When discussing the use of hex head style fasteners we might want to consider when that style became common. Prior to world war one most headed fasteners where in fact square headed with many being hand made with the head fastened to a length of straight rod. With the onset of mass production machinery in the early 1900's and the world war on the horizon,many fasteners went into mass production and in an effort to produce consistently sized pieces these often adapted the new hex style head. No wonder the railroads had square headed hardware considering the age of their infrastructure in the 1800's.f

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On 1/6/2018 at 5:26 PM, SfanGoch said:

Using a 3/4" lug nut as an example, a 0.7mm bolt head would work

Thanks Joe!

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No prob, Chris. 

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Plastic or resin is fine and for screw head photoetched is hard to beat but they are a lot of work to get to look spot on.  If you have an exposed nut or bolt head, machined aluminum or brass looks much better to my eye.  In short nothing looks more like metal than the real deal.  Yes they are more costly and if you have weak tweezers, they can disappear in a hurry but if you want the most realistic look they are the best.  Also, no clipping, sanding or painting.  All opportunities to loose them.  

Tip: Spend the money on really good tweezers. Peer Grobet makes tweezers for jewelers to handle diamonds.  Want to talk about an expensive "Twing", try having a diamond take off!  These tweezers are expensive but that is because they are precision instruments meant to handle tiny things.  I have two pair(one stainless and one brass) that I have had for at least 20 years and they can still pick up a phototeched screw head edge to edge.  How much is is worth to have a precision tool that will last you a lifetime?

Source:  The nuts you see in these photos are by RB Motion. http://www.rbmotion.com/ I have been using him as a source for a very long time.  His stuff is top drawer.  He was the machinist that did most of the stuff for Cody Grayland's stunning builds.  I have my own mill and lathe and could do my own, but I figured out some time ago that it cost me more in time and effort to do than than I would spend to buy them from him.  

 

clips with nuts.jpg

clips test fit.jpg

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