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Mixalz

Touching up flocking

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Hi everyone,

Not sure if this has come up before but today I came across a new problem. My paint used to adhere the flocking dried too fast and so the flocking wasn't thick enough and the sheen of the plastic below was visible. Turns out you can touch up flocking if using enamel paint as the adhesive and it actually looks even better than normal, especially if you want a thicker film of the flocking agent. Not sure how it would work if the initial layer has fully cured though. The nice thing is that the initial layer of flocking absorbs the new paint and prevents runs!

This is probably something you experienced modelers know but for me it was a nice surprise to learn.

Michael

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Michael, first paint the part to be flocked with the color of paint that closely matches the color of the flocking you are using.  After the paint dries, then paint on a fairly wet layer of watered down Elmer's Glue.  Do it in sections so the glue doesn't dry before you apply the flocking.  Then sprinkle on the flocking using a small strainer, applying about an eighth inch of flocking.  Let it sit for a moment, then gently press the flocking down into the Glue using the tip of your finger.  Let it sit again for a few minutes and then turn the part over and tap the bottom of the part to knock off the excess flocking onto a paper plate.  If you've done it correctly, the flocking should come out nice and even with no thin spots to show through.

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I don't bother to thin the Elmer's anymore and follow the rest of your suggestions, Rich.

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2 hours ago, crazyjim said:

I don't bother to thin the Elmer's anymore and follow the rest of your suggestions, Rich.

Ditto.

If I thin it at all, it's very slightly.

If I may make a suggestion to the OP, nix on the flocking.

Embossing powder will give you a much more realistic looking carpet.

It's relatively easy to touch up thin spots as well.

Dab a little more glue on the thin spot & shake some more powder over the top.

Fixed!

 

Steve

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I agree with Steve re using embossing powder for carpeting.  My suggestions were for using flocking for upholstery.

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Thanks for the input. I'll have to trial that method one day. Been getting awesome results with paint method so far but always open to new techniques.

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I stopped using the white glue method. I use adhesive spray instead and it works much much better. If you miss a spot you can touch it up with white glue method.

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6 hours ago, DiscoRover007 said:

I stopped using the white glue method. I use adhesive spray instead and it works much much better. If you miss a spot you can touch it up with white glue method.

The spray adhesive will work great for modern "platform" style interiors.

Not so much for the older interior buckets.

Unless you don't mind doing a lot of extra masking. ;)

 

Steve

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