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Perspective Customs

Buddy Baker's 1980 Oldsmobile 442 in 1/25th scale.

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Pics from April 21, 2018:

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I think the chrome parts look very toy-like. 

We’ll see...

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Still has the '75 style rear bumper.. did they actually look at a real car..

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Warts and all, I'm looking forward to this kit!  Any 1/25 kits for this era of Nascar are worthy of my $ investment, and because this particular kit is coming from a brand new manufacturer, this is even more so the case!

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1 hour ago, '70 Grande said:

Warts and all, I'm looking forward to this kit!  Any 1/25 kits for this era of Nascar are worthy of my $ investment, and because this particular kit is coming from a brand new manufacturer, this is even more so the case!

I agree.  I have one on pre-order.

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11 hours ago, Rob Hall said:

Still has the '75 style rear bumper.. did they actually look at a real car..

Apparently not.  This is what you get when you copy others work.

I hoped for the best when I heard about this new company, and the subject matter.  But apparently the people involved weren't interested in worrying about details, which is kind of a problem in this business.

Just as amazing, they apparently didn't even seek input/review from anyone outside the company.  This doesn't bode well for the future of this company.  You simply can't expect to charge a premium price for your product when it has glaring inaccuracies that could have been easily avoided if someone involved had been paying attention.

They are indicating that their next subject will be a '77 Monte Carlo.  Wonder if they realize that the Montes had a 116" wheelbase vs. the 112" on the Cutlass, so they would need a different chassis to be accurate.  Something tells me they don't know, and/or don't care.

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6 hours ago, Robberbaron said:

 

They are indicating that their next subject will be a '77 Monte Carlo.  Wonder if they realize that the Montes had a 116" wheelbase vs. the 112" on the Cutlass, so they would need a different chassis to be accurate.  Something tells me they don't know, and/or don't care.

Well, on real ones the wheelbase differed, but in NASCAR there was a specific wheelbase, I think. 

Edited by Rob Hall

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3 hours ago, Rob Hall said:

Well, on real ones the wheelbase differed, but in NASCAR there was a specific wheelbase, I think. 

I'm sure no expert in NASCAR, but I thought that back in the '70s they had to use the factory stock wheelbase for the specific body styles they were using?  Didn't think they started screwing around with wheelbase, etc. until they allowed the shorter wheelbase cars in the '80s, but I'm sure someone here can confirm...

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2 minutes ago, Robberbaron said:

I'm sure no expert in NASCAR, but I thought that back in the '70s they had to use the factory stock wheelbase for the specific body styles they were using?  Didn't think they started screwing around with wheelbase, etc. until they allowed the shorter wheelbase cars in the '80s, but I'm sure someone here can confirm...

Could be...for some reason, i thought I read that they had used a fixed length wheelbase, but that was before my time.  Not that it really matters in 1/25th scale. 

Edited by Rob Hall

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3 minutes ago, Rob Hall said:

Could be...for some reason, i thought I read that they had used a fixed length wheelbase, but that was before my time.  Not that it really matters in 1/25th scale. 

Trust me, a 4" scale difference in wheelbase would be noticeable to anyone familiar with these cars.

Now theoretically if they split the difference and did a scale 114" chassis, they could fudge the Cutlass body 2" longer and the Monte body 2" shorter, and probably get away with it.

This is all academic, though.  We won't know anything until someone has one of these Cutlass kits in their hands.

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Regardless of it's racing roots or the "inaccuracies", I welcome new material from the 70s and 80s. Bring it and more on... I'm down.

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NASCAR as I remember mandated a 115 inch wheelbase for these cars.  They changed to a 110 inch wheelbase in the early 1980's.

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Not to defend or anything, but ALL of these cars (real ones) were handbuilt.  The sheet metal on the sides may have been an OEM door skin, OR it may have been fabricated.  Just as has been stated - the chassis may have been under a whole other body.   There were rules in NASCAR that allowed for differences in year and chassis.  I read Petty say he loved the 71 Charger and used it til the end of 74, I think.  Rules would allow them to use a body that was a couple years old.  Petty would have stayed with that body over the replacement if he could have.  The newer bodies were  not as good. 

Not having the rule book, I can't say what it was at the time.   the leaf spring car may have been an older car rebodied and then relegated to show car status.  And if that's the case...  It all depends on what they used as the reference car.  As weird as it is, they probably did use a REAL car - why else would they make such seemingly glaring errors?  I mean some of you guys act as though you built the real car.  This is a model of a handbuilt race car.  these things change from race to race.  Sometimes they have to be changed on the same day at the race track, if they have to change to conform to a template or something.   Crews in 67- 70 would often have to beat their cars out to conform when their aero "experiments" were discovered.  Probably other years too, but I just finished a book on Bobby Isaac.   Free on Kindle Unlimited.   Should be required reading for a fan of that era of NASCAR

You guys are wrapped up in the side line crease and such, but what about the grille?  If it isn't identical to the Baker car, are you going to be all up in arms?   What if you build the Foyt car?  Are you going to correct the grille shape and trim to reflect the car you have a picture of?   If you look, you will probably find many different grille and body configurations for any one given car.   It's a "moment in time".  Buy it and build it to the best of your abilities.  Change whatever you see that needs to be changed to make it look like your reference material.   

I worked on a street stock car in the late 80s early 90s at Bowman gray Stadium in Winston-Salem, NC.   Our car was an old Tommy Ellis Busch car.  With Tommy Ellis, it won a couple, big crash at a different Bristol Race.   (Was in the opening credits of the NASCAR show on TNN at the time).  So my guy had it.  It was a 78/9 Pontiac Lemans body.   Hood, top, trunklid, and both bumper covers.  My point about this is that the grilles were cut from sheet aluminum and varied from piece to piece.   The nose caps could be from a Lemans or a Grand Am, which were slightly different.  At one point, we had two different grilles, one had four slots, the other had five.  Duh.   But we used what we had.   So IF JRS decided to kit a model and used that specific car with different grilles, could you guys still say it wasn't correct?  No.  I have Photos from the track photographer with the car in that exact configuration.   We rebodied the car every year.   Depending on the sheet metal guy, it might have creases in doors or it might not.   It might have the sloping Grand Am nose or it might have the vertical LeMans nose.  In our case, it depended on what was available from junk yards at the time.  By the time I quit helping, it was pretty much a slab sided affair.  Weld it at bottom and top and let it shape to whatever bow out it might have.

I will cut them some slack and be glad to see some builtups.   I probably will not spend $40 on the kit at this point in my life.  I can't get everything I already have built and that's a large chunk for me right now.   I do have over 100 NASCAR models built - all from the AMT or Monogram kits.   Which means one body represents every car.  Right or wrong.  All with the same noses and such even thought the cars were different from race to race.  I was happy to see decals that represented different air grilles on the front when I was building these.  

No matter what they put in the box, it will only be right for one particular car.   If you are building another version, it will not be perfect.  Ease up and be glad to have it or skip it.  Your life will not be irrevocably altered.   

Edited by randyc

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Randy. Preach it, Brother! You are SO right. I've seen similar stories with Drag Racing cars. Raced on Friday Qualifying with the "Good, New" body. Crashed on second run of day. Ran in Finals on Saturday with back-up body, hurriedly trucked in from L.A. overnight. Came in third place on Sunday still running back up body.

Stuff happens, and the 'posed' pre-race and post race photos of the same car can show variations in both markings and build details. 

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I bought a book on Nascar for one of my nephews about ten years ago.  I had wondered when they went from racing real cars to close facsimiles, as I had watched both on television.  According to the book, 1967 was the year that teams could start using a template to approximate the looks of a real car, but had to meet certain critical dimensions.  I also read elsewhere that Ford chassis have been used on all cars for years, but that may have changed within the last several years.  I quit following when they did that "chase to the cup" thing.

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I understand that details of any race vehicle varied from event to event due to all kinds of circumstances. But, a five minute Google search shows the car never ran that back bumper. Is it going to stop me from buying the kit? No, but I would appreciate a little more homework going in to their next offering.

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Kit is of zero interest to me, so fill me in on the differences

 

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Edited by gtx6970

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53 minutes ago, gtx6970 said:

Kit is of zero interest to me, so fill me in on the differences

 

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The only thing obvious now is that the rear bumper is from and earlier model, like a 74 or 75 instead of the 77 the rest of the car is. The wheels look a little iffy too. The original car seemed to run black rims so it's hard to tell if it has the five spoke style in the kit or the seven spoke style like the pics you posted but in black. 

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I'm wondering if the rear bumper might be modified without too much trouble.

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35 minutes ago, Bucky said:

I'm wondering if the rear bumper might be modified without too much trouble.

That's what I'm going to try. I have a Revell 77 Monte Carlo snap kit and I may try to copy that bumper, it's not perfect but it's closer than what's in the kit.

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