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Greg Myers

Just a few thoughts on scale

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Tamiya released A Tiger I and a Centurion with interiors in 1/25 scale in the late '60s. They both have been re-released every so often. The interior details are pretty bad. Academy has released, among other AFVs, a Jagdpanther which is also lacking in reinements normally found in 1/35 models.

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On 3/22/2018 at 12:56 PM, Greg Myers said:

1/4th $$$

Big $$$$$, bro. Somewhere in the neighborhood of 7000 bucks. This baby comes in at over 6 feet long and 250kg. Anybody interested?

Image result for 1:4 scale king tiger

1/4 King Tiger

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15 minutes ago, SfanGoch said:

Tamiya released A Tiger I and a Centurion with interiors in 1/25 scale in the late '60s. They both have been re-released every so often. The interior details are pretty bad. Academy has released, among other AFVs, a Jagdpanther which is also lacking in reinements normally found in 1/35 models.

70's releases 

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Like I said, late '60s, 1969 to be exact. I saw the Tiger I in a hobby shop in the neighborhood as a built up window display model when I was nine. It cost the princely sum of $25 at the time.

 

Edited by SfanGoch

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The metric system is based on millimeter, centimeter, decimeter, meter and kilometer and everything is evenly multiplied or divided with 10, 100, 1000 to get a larger or smaller unit of measurement, so it really doesnt matter that much what scale you are working with if you use metric.
If any scale would be very easy to do in metric it would be even scales, 1:10, 1:20, 1:50, 1:100, 1:200 1:250, 1:500 and so on and construction blueprints are often in these scales, for example 1 millimeter in 1:50th scale would be 50 millimeters (5 centimeters) in the real world.
But it works well with any scale, 1 milimeter in 1:24th scale is 24 millimeters in 1:1, 1 millimeter in 1:25th scale is 25 millimeters, and the other way around.

Edited by Force

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11 hours ago, SfanGoch said:

Like I said, late '60s, 1969 to be exact. I saw the Tiger I in a hobby shop in the neighborhood as a built up window display model when I was nine. It cost the princely sum of $25 at the time.

 

ok

Edited by Greg Myers

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As I understand the world of 'figures', a 54 mm figure represents a 6' person. An actual 6' person is 1828.8 mm tall. Divide that by 54 mm and you get 1:33.9 scale, neither 1:32 or 1:35. Go figure!

4584c2ea158da6d688280a7b8c5b33dc.jpg.01e5b164276fca475219df128f74d7d2.jpg

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On 3/22/2018 at 5:29 PM, styromaniac said:

Is 1/87th equivalent to HO scale ? I actually have some automotive kits in 1/87th intended for railroad dioramas.

It's HO. Made for use on HO train layouts or on OO (British) layouts at 1/78 scale. Slot cars (Aurora) were in the beginning at 1/87th but the sizes grew to accommodate larger motors (TycoPro)

and chassis. All the way to 1/64th scale. And those bigger cars are not necessarily "in scale" but tweaked to fit over the chassis.

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On 3/26/2018 at 7:19 PM, Art Anderson said:

Simply because the rest of the World uses the metric system, which makes 1/32 scale a bit problematic.  In addition, when Tamiya started kitting armor,  the military model world was fixated on "54mm" figures, which tended to be 1/35 scale, hence the adoption of that scale by Tamiya from the get-go.

Art

Plus the fitment of the battery box in said model tanks

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