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gigi16898

Fujimi Civic Type R Ek9 build-issues,massive one!! please help out

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Hi, everyone my name is Kevin.

I'm currently building the civic type R ek9, I'm a complete rookie when it comes to a model car,

hence I ran into the problem below:20180423_082722.thumb.jpg.7d62c2c9eaa7b9d1170f785f67b9a031.jpg

As the picture suggested, I have some area that needs to be re-worked, I had 3 layers of primer and the colour coat( white ).

I think there are only two ways to sort it out:

1. To mask the remaining area with masking tape, and re-do the fenders and the front end. (Primer+colour coat)?

    But I think the method one would take more time and money( the usage of spray can), since I already have three layers on top of each other. 

2. Masking the rest of the car as well, but instead of redoing the primer, just spray another layer of white on top of it?

    I don't know how good or bad, this might turn out to be.

20180423_082728.thumb.jpg.dfbeb780f6a4dd02061465a94ff5cf8c.jpg

Thanks for all the support from you guys, this is my first model car kit, and I want it to be as decent as it can be

Please help me out with this so I can show you guys later this month, well......hopefully. 

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Posted (edited)

I'd strip the paint and start over. There are several threads here on how to do so. 

 

Edited by Jantrix

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Posted (edited)

Quote: Jantrix, stripping the entire car down,

Well, there's one way to go, but is there any solution that I can preserve the remaining paint on top? 

Edited by gigi16898
For better understanding

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Honestly, what Jantrix said would probably save you the most frustration in the long run. Since you're only dealing with white paint and not a bunch of other details yet, it's best to bail out now, rather than dig deeper trying to fix what little is left.

With a fresh start I would suggest using white primer as a base, that way if you polish too thin it won't be as hard to touch up. Experienced painters say to use a base primer that is close to your color coat so you wont have to use as much color to cover it and you'll get a more even finish.

Also use clear coat on top of the color for added depth and to protect the color from final polishing. This is especially true for metallic paints which can't be polished without a clearcoat on top. Polishing without clear will expose the metal particles and make the paint look splotchy and dull.

Also, next time use masking tape to protect edges and sharp details from being cut through with the polishing sheets. That's also what the pros do on real cars, and if they know that they could cut through the paint, then how would we amateurs think we WON'T. 

Best wishes and don't give up, you'll get it. Remember, with so many methods to strip paint from plastic - you can always start over. Just try to get the paint right before adding chrome trim or decals so you won't ruin them if you do have to start over.

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3 hours ago, Oldcarfan27 said:

Honestly, what Jantrix said would probably save you the most frustration in the long run. Since you're only dealing with white paint and not a bunch of other details yet, it's best to bail out now, rather than dig deeper trying to fix what little is left.

With a fresh start I would suggest using white primer as a base, that way if you polish too thin it won't be as hard to touch up. Experienced painters say to use a base primer that is close to your color coat so you wont have to use as much color to cover it and you'll get a more even finish.

Also use clear coat on top of the color for added depth and to protect the color from final polishing. This is especially true for metallic paints which can't be polished without a clearcoat on top. Polishing without clear will expose the metal particles and make the paint look splotchy and dull.

Also, next time use masking tape to protect edges and sharp details from being cut through with the polishing sheets. That's also what the pros do on real cars, and if they know that they could cut through the paint, then how would we amateurs think we WON'T. 

Best wishes and don't give up, you'll get it. Remember, with so many methods to strip paint from plastic - you can always start over. Just try to get the paint right before adding chrome trim or decals so you won't ruin them if you do have to start over.

Hi, thanks for the reply, I think what Jantrix and you are saying is correct, I'm simply shocked by how difficult can it be to spray the car body, left is to start all over. BTW I was told by the staff in the model shop that the grey primer is the universal base coat which can be covered up with any colour, but just like what you said, would it be better of just using a white primer? since my colour coat is white.

Thanks for all you advice I will not give up until I have a great looking CIVIC type R in my display.

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21 minutes ago, gigi16898 said:

Hi, thanks for the reply, I think what Jantrix and you are saying is correct, I'm simply shocked by how difficult can it be to spray the car body, left is to start all over. BTW I was told by the staff in the model shop that the grey primer is the universal base coat which can be covered up with any colour, but just like what you said, would it be better of just using a white primer? since my colour coat is white.

Thanks for all you advice I will not give up until I have a great looking CIVIC type R in my display.

I think what the model shop meant was that you should be able to paint most kinds of paints over the primer and it wont have a bad reaction.

If the colour of your primer is very different to the colour of your paint, then you need to use more coats of paint. Too many coats make the fine details disappear, so it's best to use as little paint as you need to, to get a consistent colour coat on your car.
Having a white primer coat means you can use fewer coats of white paint.

I have only built 3 models so far, so am a beginner like you, so am just sharing what I know :)  

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32 minutes ago, shaunmza said:

I think what the model shop meant was that you should be able to paint most kinds of paints over the primer and it wont have a bad reaction.

If the colour of your primer is very different to the colour of your paint, then you need to use more coats of paint. Too many coats make the fine details disappear, so it's best to use as little paint as you need to, to get a consistent colour coat on your car.
Having a white primer coat means you can use fewer coats of white paint.

I have only built 3 models so far, so am a beginner like you, so am just sharing what I know :)  

Thanks for your tip, I'm a rookie as well, but painting the model car has proven to be more difficult than I thought initially.

I had another thought, which is using the masking tape to mask the good area, sand down the bad one, and using the white primer to do the rest of the bad area?

since I have to buy new stuff such as brake fluid or similar stuff to peel the paint off

I just hope everything pays off once I have finished the body. Fingers cross

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8 minutes ago, gigi16898 said:

Thanks for your tip, I'm a rookie as well, but painting the model car has proven to be more difficult than I thought initially.

I had another thought, which is using the masking tape to mask the good area, sand down the bad one, and using the white primer to do the rest of the bad area?

since I have to buy new stuff such as brake fluid or similar stuff to peel the paint off

I just hope everything pays off once I have finished the body. Fingers cross

That might work, I have paint issues on a Mini I am building and I am trying to fix them by masking off an area as well.

In my experience you need to take the masking tape off as soon as you can, or the glue on the making tape will attack the paint. Not sure if it will do the same to your paint too, but as a precaution, don't leave it on for hours.

Worst case you have to strip the paint off anyway, so you lose some time and paint.

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20 minutes ago, shaunmza said:

That might work, I have paint issues on a Mini I am building and I am trying to fix them by masking off an area as well.

In my experience you need to take the masking tape off as soon as you can, or the glue on the making tape will attack the paint. Not sure if it will do the same to your paint too, but as a precaution, don't leave it on for hours.

Worst case you have to strip the paint off anyway, so you lose some time and paint.

Thanks for the tip again, I didn't know the masking tape could attack the paint, I thought they were designed not to eat in the paint, but I guess you have proven them wrong. lol. 

Does Tamiya sell the masking tape with larger width? because all I saw were the tape that comes with like 2 cm. It should make my life easier for masking procedure.

Again, thanks for your help mate sincerely.   

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Keep in mind the thickness of the masking tape. Paint builds up at the tape line, so in scale it becomes a huge line that you now have to try to blend in. Unless you can do it at the hood seam, it generally doesn't work.

I have heard of modelers using Bare Metal foil as a mask with good results. Just use strips at the area you want to mask off and use masking tape to protect the rest. I have used aluminum foil to cover the rest of the car and tape it at the paint area. It's quick, cheap and doesn't damage paint as tape sometimes can.

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11 hours ago, Oldcarfan27 said:

Keep in mind the thickness of the masking tape. Paint builds up at the tape line, so in scale it becomes a huge line that you now have to try to blend in. Unless you can do it at the hood seam, it generally doesn't work.

I have heard of modelers using Bare Metal foil as a mask with good results. Just use strips at the area you want to mask off and use masking tape to protect the rest. I have used aluminum foil to cover the rest of the car and tape it at the paint area. It's quick, cheap and doesn't damage paint as tape sometimes can.

Thanks for your advice, I believe by using the aluminium foil could save lots of money since the masking tape is ridiculously expensive.

Thanks for providing me such a great way and saves my already broken wallet as well!!

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Anytime. Thing I've found is that most modelers enjoy sharing their knowledge and tips to other builders to help them be better at it.

If I have shortcuts and advice to give someone who can use it, I'm more than happy to share my experiences to make it easier for them to be a better builder.

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Instead of stripping the paint how about creating a couple of primer spots on the car to make it look likes its had damage that hasn't been fully repaired. Take a piece of paper and create an a small irregular hole, hold it a small distance from the body so that you get soft edges.  Continue on with the build and use what you've learned from this one. You will avoid wasting what you've done.

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16 hours ago, bobthehobbyguy said:

Instead of stripping the paint how about creating a couple of primer spots on the car to make it look likes its had damage that hasn't been fully repaired. Take a piece of paper and create an a small irregular hole, hold it a small distance from the body so that you get soft edges.  Continue on with the build and use what you've learned from this one. You will avoid wasting what you've done.

Thanks for such a wonderful idea but considering this is my first model kit car. I'd like it to be stock. You have the point, I can learn from the mistake that I made and become a better one

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