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Posted (edited)

Hello. Many, many years ago i bought a very inexpensive airbrush set from testors. it kind of looked like this, but https://www.michaels.com/10368311.html but it had an air bottle for the propellant that connected directly to the airbrush. I enjoyed using it, but eventually it was broken and i ended up buying a tamiya airbrush. i dont remember specifically which model i had, but it was a much higher quality over the beginner testors one i had. it looked similar to this

3740157947_ea977836b7.jpg

 

when i used that airbrush however, the lines on it were so thin, and no matter what adjusting i did to it, i could never get a wide spray on the brush, so everything i painted looked like a zebra.

 

eventually i gave up and went back to spray paints.

 

i was looking at getting into getting an airbrush again so i have more options for color vs spray paint choices. below are my questions.

1. how do i know before buying an air brush if it will be able spray wide enough to use to paint a body without having very skinny lines and having to go back and forth on the body 100 times just to cover it (like my tamiya one). Is there some sort of text on the description i should look for? 

2. I live in an apartment with an upstairs neighbor that is a complete psycho. She complains about every noise she hears, including the management supplied air conditioner. This makes me want to get something with an air supply that is quiet (like a bottle, not a noisy compressor). I can tell the lady upstairs to take a walk when she complains about the noise of an AC unit, but if i have a loud compressor, she might have a point.  (although out of spite i would also like to know the name of the very loudest compressor available)

3. i really cant/wont spend a lot of money on a new air brush. i would like to keep it no higher than 50 dollars all in. Something like this is in my price range, but again, i have no idea if this can do wide sprays to paint a body

 https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0744GXH13/ref=sxbs_ktp-hero_tr_2?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_p=3534580262&pd_rd_wg=rk4ip&pf_rd_r=GAMJXWPGB1ZRQM502PR6&pf_rd_s=desktop-sx-bottom-slot&pf_rd_t=301&pd_rd_i=B0744GXH13&pd_rd_w=KMJMP&pf_rd_i=airbrush+kit&pd_rd_r=7a946278-c869-4f8d-9da5-37d4e32e8dcc&ie=UTF8&qid=1524762657&sr=2

 or maybe this with a bottle of air for the pressure

https://www.amazon.com/Master-Airbrush-Multi-Master-Performance-Dual-Action/dp/B0067BAYNO/ref=sr_1_63?s=arts-crafts&ie=UTF8&qid=1524762777&sr=1-63&keywords=airbrush+kit

 

any help in direction would be very helpful. if you can answer some or all of my questions, i would greatly appreciate it. 

Edited by youpey

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I will try to answer your questions Miles to the best of my limited knowledge.

1.) If you look at the first line in the description part of the Master airbrush link you posted you will see where it states the diameter of the three needles/nozzles that the airbrush will spray a 2" wide pattern. That is the info that you need to look for when viewing MFGs sites. That should be good for what you are doing.

As an aside, to get that 2" pattern also depends on the distance between the airbrush and the surface you are spraying.

Of the two you posted links to I would go with the Master. Should be a better one for what you want to do and with the additional needles/nozzles it is more versatile. The first link looks to be an airbrush used for cake decorating.

2.) If you decide to use propellant bottles plan to purchase a few at a time.  There's nothing quite as "joyful" as running out of air in the middle of a paint job. If you get a compressor try to have it turned on so you know how loud it is. You not only need quiet, you also need one that produces the CFM that the airbrush requires. Along with an air regulator. That is the one reason I personally would not use propellant cans, no way to adjust the air pressure.

If your neighbor is fussy with noise, how is she with smell? Depending on what type material you plan to spray, like lacquer, you will need a good source of fume removal. Acrylic, not so much.

I try to avoid noisy compressors so I have none to recommend.

3.) If you are on a limited budget try the local craigslist. I know that here in the 'Burgh some sellers think they are gold but I've gotten deals on quite a few. You may be able to find a complete system at a reasonable price. Go to various MFG websites to look for the ones that fit your need so you know what to search 'craigs for.

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A lot of guys here are very happy with their Paasche H.  You can get a complete set including a hose for a slightly over $50.  

Don

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2 hours ago, Don Wheeler said:

A lot of guys here are very happy with their Paasche H.  You can get a complete set including a hose for a slightly over $50.  

Don

Thank you, this is helpful. i will take a look closely at this one. the ones i had linked, i had never heard of either brand. paasche i know of them. 

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There is some airbrush info here that may be helpful https://sites.google.com/site/donsairbrushtips/home

For quiet spraying, a 12 or 15 gallon air pig may do the trick. It would need a regulator fitted, and would need to be filled up with a compressor prior to painting each car body. Filling it can be done at a gas station ( a proper gas station, not a convenience store with pumps) or mechanic's shop. Not an ideal solution, but it is quiet, and much cheaper than disposable cans of compressed gas. Or, there is the option of using a full on industrial gas cylinder (think oxy & acetylene bottles) filled with nitrogen or CO2 to 2000-4000 psi, depending on the cylinder spec. They come in a variety of sizes, are more costly and more of a pain to move around and get filled, but you won't have to fill one very often. Oh, and it will need a more expensive regulator, too. Just a couple of options.

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There is actually another air compressor option  http://www.californiaairtools.com/  these are a brand of quiet air compressors, I have a 5 gallon compressor that I use in the house in my hobby room, no complaints from my wife over the noise like my old compressor.

Airbrushes, one of the beginner air brushes that I have reccomended is actually the Harbor Freight DeLuxe airbrush.  Sure it's cheap, it's a cheap knockoff of the bigger bucks models, it has the adjustments needed to make corrections.  Once you get used to working with the Harbor Freight Airbrush and have decided whether you wish to use an airbrush  (or not) then decide which airbrush actually fits your needs.  Get used to assembling and disassembling the cheap airbrush, then when you graduate to a better one you will already have the habits of keeping one clean and adjusted for a lot less money than an Iwata, Paasche, or other better airbrushes.

I've been fooling around with Airbrushes for over 40 years, I've helped a lot of people get started in using one too.  My first airbrush was a Badger single action with canned propellant!  Then a spare tire for air, a tank then a five gallon compressor (used for other garage stuff).  Next was a Badger dual action, then a Paasche I use Iwata and Paasche mostly now for models and  custom paint work.

You mentioned "zebra striping" sounds like the tip on the brush is a little too small, it might be a "detail" tip where you might need a broader tip to get more coverage.   This is something that can be addressed when you graduate up to a better airbrush which will have a wider variety of tips available to correct or address any coverage problems you might encounter.

You might want to pick up a copy or two of Airbrush Action magazine, read everything you can about running an airbrush, they also advertise some excellent "quiet" air compressors.  The other model car magazine and Fine Scale Modeler have had many Good articles on using an airbrush for models try and see if you can pick up some of the back issues covering the subject.

From a former apartment manager; as far as the "old bag" upstairs, you pay your rent the same as she does and are entitled to the use of your rented home the same as any other resident of your apartment complex.  I take it that you are able to hear her walking on the floors above your head, maybe her tv, stereo or other noises correct.  She has to realize and this should be made clear to her through the apartment management that she is living in a multiple resident apartment and therefore she can and will at times hear, smell or otherwise notice the presence of other residents in the building at times.  You should have a long talk with your apartment manager about this, if it still remains an issue request to be moved to another unit, even threaten to move out.  Apartment managers don't like the move out because it makes them work to rehab the unit to be rentable so this ploy might work for you.  Just make sure you stand up for yourself and establish the bat as the whiner that she is, which the manager probably already knows.

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I use a Air Elite 175X compressor with a 3 liter tank. It's so quiet you can't hear it running in the next room with the doors open.   Under $100.00

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Posted (edited)

Get a 20 lb. CO2 tank. They can be had for as little as 60 bucks. You'll also need a regulator and adapter fittings to attach an air hose. Benefits:

1. No noise. 

2. CO2 contains no water; so, you don't need a moisture trap.

3. It's far more economical than buying multiple cans of airbrush propellant. Getting a 20 lb. tank refilled will run you around 20 bucks. There are plenty of welding supply houses, beer distributors and even Home Depot in Jersey where you can get the tank refilled. A tankful of CO2 should last you for a few years.

4. It doesn't take up much space. You can store it in a corner or a closet.

5. It doesn't require any external power source. 

Edited by SfanGoch

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On 4/27/2018 at 1:13 PM, Don Wheeler said:

A lot of guys here are very happy with their Paasche H.  You can get a complete set including a hose for a slightly over $50.  

Don

Another vote for the Paasche H. I've never owned or used one, but I use the very similar Badger 350 and it's just about perfect for model car work. I've never known anyone who had a Paasche H to complain about it. 

At Hobby Lobby, I found a Paasche-branded airbrush that seems to be a Chinese knockoff of the Badger 350. With coupon, I was out the door with it for under $20. Haven't used it yet, but I have used a similar (identical?) Chinese knockoff I got at a flea market for $12 to spray clear very successfully. I can't imagine Paasche would put their label on the thing if it weren't halfway decent. 

FORGET the propellant cans. The only thing they're good for spraying is money out of your wallet. Get a tank or a compressor. I've said many times, I'd rather paint with a third rate airbrush and a decent tanked compressor than with the finest airbrush made and either propellant cans or a dinky little "hobby" compressor without a tank. Your air source is AT LEAST as important as your airbrush. 

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I bought a California Air compressor that is extremely quiet when compared to the old pancake I used.

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Want a noisy compressor? Craftsman 80 gal 5 hp. I have that attached to the back of my house in a little shed. When I need it, I just turn it on and open the door. LOL. I do have a small compressor in the garage for airbrushing, and small jobs that I need the portable for. As long as I keep my compressor off during the hours of 10 pm to 7 am, i don't care if i disturb anyone.

 

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I started out with a Badger 350 kit including 'air can.' Total waste of time n money. The air can froze up after 1 minute and the airbrush wouldn't spray fine enough. Sounds like you're on the other side of the coin. The Master airbrush you're looking at seems like a good choice, you've got 3 needle size options which should cover most apps. Most of the newer technology airbrushes are made by a Japanese company (Fujiosaki?) and then branded for Iwata, Tamiya, Bear, etc. You'll go dizzy doing comparisons, check out the Iwata line and if you see one (like the Master) that looks the same and isn't made in China by a substandard knock-off company, that's a safe way to go. On the Murican side, a Badger 150 or Paasche H can give you years of trouble free service. They've got newer models as well, just get one that has 3 needle capability.

As to propellant, I highly recommend CO2. Any industrial gas supplier can fix you up with a 10 pound tank that will last for at least a year. On the budget side, you can get a mechanics air tank which will need refilling from a service station compressor but it's quiet as well. Only disadvantage to this is getting an inline filter to make sure you don't get oil or moisture in your line. You'll also need to buy fittings to go from your airbrush line to the air source.

If you're going to paint flames or Luftwaffe camouflage you'll be needing a regulator. Buy the best one you can afford. If you're just spraying car bodies you can work without one.

HTH

Keeper

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If you can find a brand name on your current airbrush you might be able to buy a needle/cone set for it. Your pic looks like one of the Fujiosaki clones so you might be able to do an upgrade. If it's a Chinese copy the threading may be incompatible. Got a art supply/craft store close by where someone could take a look?

Keeper

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Here I go again; Japanese airbrushes are made by Fuso Seiki. Master is a Chinese knock off and here's what you're in for:

Here they have needles that bent when you throw a suspicious look at them! Nozzles made of a 0.3 or even 0.2 mm brass sheet, loose threads, cheap rubber O-rings and scratches left after surfacing in the factory. It all reflects into final price. My Master airbrush is a nice example.

More here:

http://airbrushdoc.com/discussion/best-airbrush/

hth

Keeper

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One noisy compressor you may want to stay away from is the Harbor Freight pancake model that goes on sale for $39.99 every few months. I have one and it works well, driving my brad nailers with no issue, but that sucker will run you out of a small room with all the racket it makes.

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