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Red318

Stripes on WD Teague Texaco stations

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I'm looking to do a quick (by my standards) build of a Walter Teague design Texaco gas station.  I can't tell from photos if the green stripes around the building are applied individually directly onto the wall or if they are mounted on a separate panel first.

Can any one help or provide detail photos?

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Thanks for this David.  I'm beginning to wonder if there was a standard design but different construction methods used as each photo seems to show slight differences and modern restorations may not be as the original.  That said the period photo on that Henry Ford site is the best I have seen for real working garage clutter.  It's given me some ideas to create some atmosphere.  I'm using DAS clay on foamboard for the first time on this quickie project, as much to see how it works as anything else.  I'll start a build thread once I get the chance to take some pictures.

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I have used DAS clay and foamboard, but not both together. I think you will have a lot of fun with that diorama build and pleased to hear the photo was of some use to you, certainly good for inspiration.

David

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The picture and the following attachment are from a book titled "The American Gas Station". Here is what the caption said next to the picture. 

"Partially influenced by the unadorned simplicity of the International Style, Walter Dorwin Teague presented a number of distinct station models to Texaco's Board of directors by 1937. By use of rounded roof lines and aerodynamic gas pumps mounted on smoothed islands, the new structures contained marked references to the Streamline Moderne. By 1940 over 500 of the new stations were built or remodeled to Teague's specifications."

5afe3060ad82e_Texacogasstation1950s.jpg.3ffa743baeb231f1ac4d59bc2e26143c.jpg

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Vietnam Vet67 , thanks for this, another really useful photo and another variation, with no canopy and the pumps a long way from the building, maybe in a drier state where land was cheaper.  The glazing in the shop is also different and appears to have glazing in the end wall.  I like the "Registered Rest Room" sign - who did they register with?  Lots of ideas here and I've ordered a copy of the book.

I've got the basic structure done in foam board, now I need to decide how the details will look - here's a couple of pics of progress so far.

5aff14bfbd1db_Texaco2.thumb.jpg.e24c02e0c838f674b066b37909a032ad.jpg5aff14d8316ad_Texaco3.thumb.jpg.cb2abf92a231c49f478acae1578f87da.jpg

 

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Generally speaking , the Periclean Box stations you're referring to had the "Speed lines " around the top molded into tiles that were then adhered to the concrete block building . Now in the case of a Pre Fab Metal station , Shown in the 1st photo , the Speed lines were actually part of the exterior sheet metal

Texaco - US 60 somewhere in California  pre fab metal.jpg

Texaco Weaton Maryland.jpg

Texaco-Taunton, Mass.- 1940.jpg

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I really like these '50's black & white photographs of motor car showrooms and gas / petrol stations, both in the USA and England too. They are always good for reference when you are building a scale model diorama from this period.

David

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Ellen, Ed 

 

Thanks for the pictures,  these are absolutely dripping with atmosphere and that Pontiac dealership is amazing, but I don't think I've got the room for that in 1/25!   Plenty of ideas though and I'm amazed by the variation in "standard" designs.  Watch this space for my updates once I decide what it's going to look like.

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8 hours ago, Anglia105E said:

I really like these '50's black & white photographs of motor car showrooms and gas / petrol stations, both in the USA and England too. They are always good for reference when you are building a scale model diorama from this period.

David

They are excellent David aren't they .  I can also recommend the book "Fill 'er Up!: The Great American Gas Station", which despite the title covers a lot from the UK, Germany, the Netherlands and others. 

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Thanks for the recommendation on the book David, and I shall keep a lookout for it. Any reference material that comes up while I am doing research for a project is always useful and very interesting even if it is not entirely relevant to the current project.

David

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