[[Template core/front/global/utilitiesMenu does not exist. This theme may be out of date. Run the support tool in the AdminCP to restore the default theme.]]
MAGIC MUFFLER

Figuring out a scale size...Help!

Recommended Posts

I have a real Crackerbox Racing Boat that is 14 ft long.

There is a model I want to build that is 14 inches long.

I want to build a motor for this model ( Flathead ) then what scale motor would I look for to build????

Thank you,

Any help on this appreciated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Awesome!!! Have no idea how you figured that out. Thank you

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, MAGIC MUFFLER said:

Awesome!!! Have no idea how you figured that out. Thank you

comment deleted

Edited by BigTallDad

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the full-size boat is 14ft long and the model is 14 inches long, that means every inch of the model is equivalent to a foot in the full-size boat. A foot is 12 inches...so that's "one to twelve", or 1:12.

168"                                            12"
_____  divide each by 14=     ______

14"                                               1"

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fantastic!!!  Learn something new everyday!

 

Really appreciated and thank you my Canadian friend as I'm from Canada as well but living in California.

 

Cheers

Bill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, MAGIC MUFFLER said:

Fantastic!!!  Learn something new everyday!

Any "scale" is simply an expression of what fraction of the size of the real anything a model of it is.

For instance, 1:25 scale is the same as 1/25 scale, and they both mean that the real thing in question is 25 times larger than the model.

All other scales work the same way.

Let's say you have a model and you don't know what scale it is. Measure its length in inches. Then google the length of a real one, in inches (or in your case, as shown above, multiply the length of your real boat in feet by 12 to get its length in inches,  14 X 12 =168). Divide the real dimension by the length of the model (or in your case, the length of the model you want to build, 14 inches). You'll get a number. Put a "1" over it in a fraction, and you now know the scale.

168 divided by 14 = 12.  Your scale is 1/12, or 1:12.

Now, let's say you wanted to build a model of your real boat in 1:25 scale. Take the length of the real one again, 168 inches, and divide by 25. You get 6.72 inches, so that's how long a 1/25 or 1:25 scale model would be.

Edited by Ace-Garageguy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is where this grade-school level math comes in handy. The stuff we didn't think we'll ever use. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/23/2018 at 9:57 PM, peteski said:

This is where this grade-school level math comes in handy. The stuff we didn't think we'll ever use. :)

So true. I was a miserable math student in high school, flunking Algebra II but managed to pass calculus in college. Go figure. Never saw the need for math in my adolescent years but I learned netter later. I've really used it a lot building and racing 1 to 1s and model cars too. I learned as an instructor at a nuclear plant for a student to "get it", you've got to relate it to real life. Doesn't matter what you're teaching.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Miatatom said:

So true. I was a miserable math student in high school, flunking Algebra II but managed to pass calculus in college. Go figure. Never saw the need for math in my adolescent years but I learned netter later. I've really used it a lot building and racing 1 to 1s and model cars too. I learned as an instructor at a nuclear plant for a student to "get it", you've got to relate it to real life. Doesn't matter what you're teaching.

I agree heartily.

Though I was fine with everything through algebra, I struggled with calculus my first quarter. The instructor was a pure-math enthusiast, and had little interest in helping us grasp how it could be applied to real-world problem solving.

Once I understood how it could be used as a tool, everything changed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Ace-Garageguy said:

Once I understood how it could be used as a tool, everything changed.

That light bulb moment!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's why I model in 1/25 scale.  Since there are 25.4 mm in one inch, using a metric ruler is pretty well on the mark.  That 0.4mm doesn't really make that much difference for most of what we do so to make things easy use a metric ruler and for every full size inch call it a millimeter.  A 145" wheel base in real life would be 145 mm!:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A wheelbase of 145" would actually be 147.32 mm in 1/25. Calling an inch one millimeter works fine for smaller measurements but for larger measurements the 1.5% or so difference starts to add up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A more accurate method of scaling when working in 1/25 scale is using .040" to represent 1''. This makes the math easy when scaling parts; .020" = 1/2 inch,  .010" = 1/4 inch,  .005" = 1/8 inch, etc.  .080 = 2 inches,  .120" = 3 inches, etc. It makes for an excellent scaling method when scratchbuilding.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Bainford said:

A more accurate method of scaling when working in 1/25 scale is using .040" to represent 1''. This makes the math easy when scaling parts; .020" = 1/2 inch,  .010" = 1/4 inch,  .005" = 1/8 inch, etc.  .080 = 2 inches,  .120" = 3 inches, etc. It makes for an excellent scaling method when scratchbuilding.

That's a good rule-of-thumb to put on a sticky note in plain view over the bench.  :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now