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Food Dehydrators & Paint Dryers

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9 hours ago, NOBLNG said:

I have read on here that 105F is OK and will not damage styrene, so I set it at either 95 to warm the paint or 105 to dry it. I have never checked it for accuracy, but have not melted anything yet.:unsure:

Thanks man. 

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Posted (edited)
On 4/21/2019 at 9:23 AM, Rider said:

Thanks man. 

It should be fine. I've gone to 110f and typically do 108 or 109 in an air fryer set on dehydrate. Not sure about the rig posted on but others seem good with 105. The air fryer is very accurate so even if your rig is off a bit I doubt it's going over 110....

Edited by Dave G.

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1 hour ago, Dave G. said:

It should be fine. I've gone to 110f and typically do 108 or 109 in an air fryer set on dehydrate. Not sure about the rig posted on but others seem good with 105. The air fryer is very accurate so even if your rig is off a bit I doubt it's going over 110....

Thanks for taking the time to post this. I have an alterior motive to find out what temp works so I could make my own out of a 12" sono tube a 100w bulb,  a dimmer switch and a little variable speed fan. Those things are not cheap, but I am. 

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20 minutes ago, Rider said:

Thanks for taking the time to post this. I have an alterior motive to find out what temp works so I could make my own out of a 12" sono tube a 100w bulb,  a dimmer switch and a little variable speed fan. Those things are not cheap, but I am. 

Interesting. A guy over in the Fine Scale Modeler forum uses a plastic storage bin with a light bulb in it. I think it's a 60w bulb. He drilled a few air holes and says it works well. But I think circulating air is key personally.

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1 minute ago, Dave G. said:

Interesting. A guy over in the Fine Scale Modeler forum uses a plastic storage bin with a light bulb in it. I think it's a 60w bulb. He drilled a few air holes and says it works well. But I think circulating air is key personally.

I've done it in the past with a cheap from China off evilBay desk/office space heater, and plastic shoe boxes. The bearings went on it in about a month. Also had one about 10yrs ago with one of those tiny electric wall mounted space heaters flowing into an old camp oven. The kind meant to sit over coals. Worked great until we moved and my wife chucked it all out thinking it was scrap metal, ugh. My fault for not labelling it. It really was an awesome little set up. Being cheap, I will figure out something. I recently had a big one in my hands at a the Goodwill down in Sedona for 10$. Had to leave it there, we were van camping, so not enough room for it, grrr. Lol.

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Posted (edited)

I've used a paint dryer ( food dehydrator ) for years and the first one was given to me from a friend. I made a switch box to control the fan and heating element. I used a double gang electrical box to mount a receptacle and a light dimmer. The dimmer is used for the heat only. It finally gave up the ship and I threw it in the dump. 

I was at a used thrift store yesterday and they had what looked like a fairly new one for $20. I plugged it in before buying it and the fan made a terrible noise. Also the heat didn't work through the thermostat. I was hoping the element wasn't burnt out so I bought it for $5.00 and hoped I could fix it. Got it home and took it apart and I shimmed the fan motor because the fan blades was hitting the frame. Fixed that problem. Now the heat. After making sure the element was working, I used a jumper across the high limit fuse and the element worked. So, I disconnected the wire to the fuse and ran it straight to the element. Fixed that problem. Now with it, I can use the built in thermostat to control the high limit and use the dimmer switch to control the temp. I let it heat and run for an hour and adjusted the dimmer for 102 degrees. Works great now. I am an old retired electrician and electronics buff so it was a very easy job to do for me. 

I have loads of enamel paint I've kept over the years to do the details with and I'm glad I was able to remake the dryer again.

Edited by retired & glad

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Hmm, if you are electrician and electronics buff then you are well aware that a fuse is there for a reason.  If it blew, then something is not right with the circuit it is protecting.  Bypassing it doesn't seem like a smart idea to me.

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3 hours ago, peteski said:

Hmm, if you are electrician and electronics buff then you are well aware that a fuse is there for a reason.  If it blew, then something is not right with the circuit it is protecting.  Bypassing it doesn't seem like a smart idea to me.

Thanks Peter for the concern. Yep, safety has always been on my mind when messing with circuits. ( History )=== I started in the electrical trade in 1969. Got into Ham radio in the early 70's and have operated and built more than I can remember numerous transmitters, receivers, and lots of accessories for them.  Most worked but had a few things that didn't work. In the electrical end, I have been a employee, contractor, and an estimator over this time period. 

Now to the safety of this project. When I found it at the thrift store I thought it was a new one. It still had the plastic cap over the plug as shipped. It looked like it had never been used. When I plugged it in there, the motor made a terrible sound and the heat didn't work. I got it real cheap and had a good idea and hoped  I could fix it. When I got it home, I took it apart and found the fan blades was hitting the frame, so I shimmed the motor and that cured that problem. Checked the heater and found the inline series fuse was bad. It is a one time fuse about the size of a small resistor. No markings on it for the temp. limit. I found the thermostat wires were wrapped around the thermostat and looked like it could have caused the therm. to not operate right. The heater winding's looked new and not burnt into. So, I bypassed the fuse and the heater works. I then replace the power cord with the unit I made years ago for another one that quit working because of the motor bearings finally wore out. If it had been used, then the fan intake could have been blocked since the intake is on the bottom and could have restricted the air flow. 

I hooked up the external dimmer from the last one and adjusted the voltage for 102 degrees and that keeps it at a comfortable temp. After unwrapping the wires from around the internal thermostat, I played with the internal thermostat all day to make sure it was working OK. So I have it set up to use the dimmer control to set the temp. and the internal therm. to use as a higher limit. I keep a metal thermometer in the top lid and can check on it often. I'm never that far away from the unit and I also have a fire extinguisher close by also. 

The one I had before finally gave up the ship because of motor bearings worn out. I've been using this one for the last few days and have let it operate about all day to dry some enamel paint on some parts on a kit I am working on.

I appreciate the concern on this and I think it will be OK. If not, the fire station is just a few blocks from me. LOL    

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Sounds like things are under control Richard. :)

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My high-tech facility.  :lol:  Helps to live in Arizona to begin with.  But I would not do this during the summer, "it's a dry heat" is not to be taken lightly.

IMG_0525_Fotor.jpg

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20 minutes ago, 89AKurt said:

My high-tech facility.  :lol:  Helps to live in Arizona to begin with.  But I would not do this during the summer, "it's a dry heat" is not to be taken lightly.

IMG_0525_Fotor.jpg

That sure looks like a hot place. If that is the clutch and brake pedals, I like the homebrew way of it. The heat sure has played havoc with the dash.

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Posted (edited)
13 minutes ago, retired & glad said:

That sure looks like a hot place. If that is the clutch and brake pedals, I like the homebrew way of it. The heat sure has played havoc with the dash.

The heater control lever was broken, so removed the whole unit, will get a repo someday.  So those blocks are connected to the heater valve cable.  :lol:  It's a 51 year old pickup, sunbaked for sure.

Edited by 89AKurt
added link to Chevy forum

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Posted (edited)

Quick question re: dehydrators...

I'm assuming most employ some sort of fan that draws in air to heat and circulate around the drying chamber.  What I can't see (at least in the models I've looked at in online pictures) is any kind of filtering going on.  Does the outside air being drawn in by the fan get filtered or are we potentially pulling in all matter of dust, dog hair and other nasties.  I live in AZ and dust is everywhere here... so that's a concern.  I've yet to start my first project (still setting up my work area) but I was planning on just covering the model with a plastic tub or something similar to keep dust particles from settling on the body while it's drying.

Dehydrators seem like a neat way to speed up the drying process from what I've read but dust is a bigger enemy than time for me.

Don

Edited by DonaldBrent

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On 6/27/2019 at 12:16 PM, DonaldBrent said:

Quick question re: dehydrators...

I'm assuming most employ some sort of fan that draws in air to heat and circulate around the drying chamber.  What I can't see (at least in the models I've looked at in online pictures) is any kind of filtering going on.  Does the outside air being drawn in by the fan get filtered or are we potentially pulling in all matter of dust, dog hair and other nasties.  I live in AZ and dust is everywhere here... so that's a concern.  I've yet to start my first project (still setting up my work area) but I was planning on just covering the model with a plastic tub or something similar to keep dust particles from settling on the body while it's drying.

Dehydrators seem like a neat way to speed up the drying process from what I've read but dust is a bigger enemy than time for me.

Don

My dehydrator is much simpler.  No fans, no thermostats. Just a 40W heating element on the bottom, and air slots on the top and bottom with adjustable shutters.  It moves air by natural convection (warm air raises).  The air circulation is basically imperceivable, but it does occur. The temperature can be somewhat controlled by adjusting the shutters. I keep it around 110 deg. F.

I suspect that even the dehydrators with fans to force air circulation move very little air.

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I've probably said this before and it may have been addressed in this thread: if you are using resin parts, set the temp at the lowest setting, resin is a lot softer than styrene and will warp quickly under heat....I discovered this the hard way.... -RRR

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OK. I.m sorry. I can't read all 9 pages to find out if someone already answer my question. So, I live in Florida where the humidity is just plain ridiculous. I paint in a detached 

garage. My question is, if I paint a model in this high humidity then put it in a dehydrator will that save the paint or am I screwed already before I get it into it?

I need to find a cure for this problem. Appreciate all the help I can get

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