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ROY FERGUSON

USING MOLOTOW CHROME PEN

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I am going to order letters to complete a MACK truck project from SHAPEWAYS. Should the letters be primed with a light color primer before applying the MOLOTOW chrome or applied direct to the letters ?

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Just make sure that the resin is free from release agent. Prime if you feel like it.

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If I were you, I'd use some kind of scratch filling primer before putting anything on something that's 3D printed. There's always a bit of graininess to the appearance to that material, and if you want those letters to appear right, you'll want to make sure the surface is as smooth as can be.

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ROY, WOULD YOU HAVE THE LINK FOR THOSE LETTERS?

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Hi Roy..... the Molotow Liquid Chrome pen is an excellent tool for this type of work, and I have had some good results with it. As one member mentioned, you need to clean off release agent from resin or 3D printed parts, which I am sure you would do anyway but there is one point I would like to make which should help you get the best result. The liquid chrome likes to flow over a glossy surface, so the shinier the better. What I do, and nobody told me this, is to coat the part or parts with Yacht Varnish before applying the liquid chrome. You have to wait 24 hours for the Yacht Varnish to dry completely and this leaves a high gloss finish that the liquid chrome pen really does like. Hope this makes sense!

David

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1 hour ago, Anglia105E said:

What I do, and nobody told me this, is to coat the part or parts with Yacht Varnish before applying the liquid chrome. You have to wait 24 hours for the Yacht Varnish to dry completely and this leaves a high gloss finish that the liquid chrome pen really does like. Hope this makes sense!

David

That's the first I've heard that and something I'll have to remember! I do know that the finish doesn't like to be handled much after it's on, but guys have swore by the Liquid Createx that you can find in Hobby Lobby. Apply it after the pen paint has dried completely, and then apply the Createx. This protects the finish, and it doesn't affect its brilliance once it's on.

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Thanks for your comment Bill. and certainly it is a good idea to apply the Liquid Createx to protect the finish. I've seen mixed reports about how some model builders say you can't handle the Liquid Chrome pen finish even after 24 hours, while others say that as long as you leave it for 24 hours you can handle the model car with care, and the liquid chrome does not rub off. Myself, I like this product very much, and although I still use Bare Metal Foil which is also a wonderful product, I do find myself using the Molotow Liquid Chrome pen much more for chrome work recently. The Yacht Varnish, by the way, is also brilliant when applied over Revell Aqua Color matt acrylic paint, as my 1927 Fred Astaire Rolls-Royce Phantom I will testify!

David

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2 hours ago, MrObsessive said:

That's the first I've heard that and something I'll have to remember! I do know that the finish doesn't like to be handled much after it's on, but guys have swore by the Liquid Createx that you can find in Hobby Lobby. Apply it after the pen paint has dried completely, and then apply the Createx. This protects the finish, and it doesn't affect its brilliance once it's on.

Any more info on the Liquid Createx ??? part number ? I thought I knew most of the Createx products but I am not sure of this one.

Thanks

Jon

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1 hour ago, Jon Haigwood said:

Any more info on the Liquid Createx ??? part number ? I thought I knew most of the Createx products but I am not sure of this one.

Thanks

Jon

Jon, I don't have a part number for you as it was sample of it given to me in a tiny container, so I don't have the bottle it was in. Perhaps someone else can let us know. I do know that those that have used it swear by it. I tried it on a tiny part-----a mirror that was on my '63 Porsche I rebuilt months ago, and I saw no ill effects from it.

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Yes, the 3-d printed parts from Shapeways will have some wax residue, and will also have slight texture (from the printing process).  I rinse the parts in Bestine rubber cement thinner (Heptane) or in lighter fluid (Naphtha).  Then the parts need smoothing - a sandable primer should do the trick.  Then I agree that the smoother and shiner the base coat is, the more like chrome the Molotow paint will look like.

If you think about it, the "real" mirror-like chrome on cars is as smooth as glass (so it reflects light like glass).  The same applies to any reflective silver finish (like Alclad II or Molorow chrome paints).

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On 12 August 2018 at 9:59 AM, Jon Haigwood said:

Any more info on the Liquid Createx ??? part number ? I thought I knew most of the Createx products but I am not sure of this one.

Thanks

Jon

I wonder if it's just one of their standard clea coats?

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On 8/12/2018 at 10:12 PM, peteski said:

  Then the parts need smoothing - a sandable primer should do the trick.  Then I agree that the smoother and shiner the base coat is, the more like chrome the Molotow paint will look like.

One tip for sanding small parts is that I will stick them to painters blue tape. It gives you something to hold onto when handling, plus you can sand the surface flat.  If you are concerned with the stickum around the lettering still being tacky,  Testors Dullcote will take the stick outta tape! 

AND... make sure the back side of the letters sit flat against a model body, you may need to sand that side as well.

And for actually coloring the letters with the Molotow pen, having them stuck down to tape means that you don't have to touch them!  Flow the pen on generously quickly, going over it again once it starts drying will leave marks.  Then let it sit for at least 24 hours before attempting touching it.

Edited by Tom Geiger

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6 hours ago, CabDriver said:

I wonder if it's just one of their standard clea coats?

I don't think any of the Createx Clears are very glossy as the name states. Work better for a intercoat clear for masking. I have tried the Spaz Stix clear over Molotow Chrome. I put Molotow Chrome on two steering wheel horn rings and brushed on some Spaz Stix Clear on one. They have been setting for about two or three weeks with no discernible difference. Next time I will try air brushing some on a larger part and do a comparison .

Edited by Jon Haigwood

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39 minutes ago, Jon Haigwood said:

I don't think any of the Createx Clears are very glossy as the name states. Work better for a intercoat clear for masking. I have tried the Spaz Stix clear over Molotow Chrome. I put Molotow Chrome on two steering wheel horn rings and brushed on some Spaz Stix Clear. They have been setting for about two or three weeks with no discernible difference. Next time I will try air brushing some on a larger part and do a comparison .

I'd be really interested to hear how that works out Jon!

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I would do a light prime coat and take it out into indirect sunlight and check for lines and flaws first.

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Lots of good advice here.  3D printed parts will need to be cleaned, and then sanded/filled/primered before they'll be smooth enough to chrome. I've been experimenting recently and found that with Shapeways Detail Plastic, parts started to get relatively smooth after a light sanding, heavy primer coat +light sanding again, and then 2 heavy coats of gloss black. Some detail starts to get lost, but not much, and it leaves the part much smoother.

Trying to chrome 3D printed parts without smoothing results in a very "noisy" looking part.

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22 hours ago, Spex84 said:

Lots of good advice here.  3D printed parts will need to be cleaned, and then sanded/filled/primered before they'll be smooth enough to chrome. I've been experimenting recently and found that with Shapeways Detail Plastic, parts started to get relatively smooth after a light sanding, heavy primer coat +light sanding again, and then 2 heavy coats of gloss black. Some detail starts to get lost, but not much, and it leaves the part much smoother.

Trying to chrome 3D printed parts without smoothing results in a very "noisy" looking part.

This is my first time dealing with Shapeways parts. Working with a set of dump headers. I primed with white primer and then a coat of flat white (Duplicolor) . The paint seemed to stay soft and rubbed off when handling. I want the flat white header look. Any suggestions on painting 3D printed parts ?

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39 minutes ago, Jon Haigwood said:

This is my first time dealing with Shapeways parts. Working with a set of dump headers. I primed with white primer and then a coat of flat white (Duplicolor) . The paint seemed to stay soft and rubbed off when handling. I want the flat white header look. Any suggestions on painting 3D printed parts ?

sounds like you didn't give them a good enough cleaning and may have missed some of the waxy residue.

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3 minutes ago, stitchdup said:

sounds like you didn't give them a good enough cleaning and may have missed some of the waxy residue.

That could have been the problem. I cleaned off the old paint and will clean them again with alcohol. Then retry the paint. Will using a dehydrator help or hinder the painting ?  

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16 minutes ago, Jon Haigwood said:

That could have been the problem. I cleaned off the old paint and will clean them again with alcohol. Then retry the paint. Will using a dehydrator help or hinder the painting ?  

I'm afraid i cant help with that, I've never used one

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Personally, I wouldn't use a dehydrator with 3D printed parts, could deform them.

 

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A note on cleaning paint off of 3D printed parts--I've found that the parts get a little soft if placed in Purple Power cleaner...not enough to be critical, but enough that long thin pieces (axles, braces, headers, etc) could potentially get a little saggy if subjected to pressure afterwards.

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