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I've been looking at airbrush choices that are affordable, and ,at least, somewhat capable.  Expense is a big factor for me although practicality is also important.  It would be used sparingly in an apartment and I would not necessarily look for professional results, just good results.  The reviews for this seem good in a lot of aspects but the usage is so varied that I'm not sure if I can trust them.  What does everyone here think?

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B002P646DE/?coliid=I1C4VT61MZEGAL&colid=7M3V0V5PZ2JC&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it&th=1

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Yeah, that looks cheap, and, well, it is.

Buy a quality airbrush and compressor, or look on your local craigslist or Habitat for Humanity resale store for a used one.

 

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Do you already have a compressor? What are you planning to use for an air source? I ask because I'm of the opinion (having learned from experience) that the air source is at least as important as the airbrush itself. I'd rather work with a second or third-rate airbrush (or even a cheap knockoff of same) and a GOOD air source than the finest airbrush in the world and a crummy air source. 

The set you're asking about seems to come with some kind of "mini compressor." I'm having a hard time imagining that it could be ANY good at that price. :huh:

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I have to echo what Snake said. Your air source is VERY important when it comes to putting out a quality paint job.

Case in point:

Years ago (back in the '80's) when I was first getting into airbrushing, my 'source' of air was those little cans of compressed which I think they still sell today. They were okay for as far as it went, but it never seemed to fail that either I would run out of air when I needed that last coat on, or the can would 'freeze' and would be of no use. That's when I knew I needed a halfway decent compressor.

Enter Badger's Whirlwind:

This was a neat compressor for the time I needed it. IIRC, it cost something like $90 back in the late '80's, and I thought I was a big shot now! I had a compressor that the 'professionals' were using and my paint jobs did improve-----to a point. The problems came when it seemed like I was always replacing parts. Namely that gasket that goes in between the head and the air ports. They were always cracking and it got to a point where I got tired of replacing those, not to mention that the Whirlwind didn't have enough pressure to push Tamiya's paints through (water based) unless it was REALLY thinned down. Of course the more thinned down those paints are, the more difficult they're to work with.

It was time to take a step up. I moved up to a Paasche compressor, and it to this day does what it does wonderfully! Nary a part has broke down, and I've had it I believe since the mid '90's.

BUT! There are times when I may need to do marathon painting, and that Paasche for as good as it still is, it can get hot. Well, about 10 years ago I decided to buy this................

P8051837-vi.jpg

Yup! A nice heavy duty compressor I picked up from a club member who was selling them for $65! I snatched one up right quick, but it was kind of a beast to take up the stairs in to my hobby room. Nevertheless, it can run for hours without as much as a whimper, although it is noisy and had one of my cats literally jump straight up into the air when it turned on. :lol:

So yeah a good airbrush is nice, but if you don't have the proper source of air to make it work as it should, it may was well be a nice paperweight. ;)

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My compressor is a Campbell-Hausfeld from Walmart, which cost less than $100 in 2002 and I think the same or a comparable model sells for even less today. It's loud, but no louder than the little Brown Speedy Sprayer I used for years, and the attached tank (I think it's 2 gallons) means I can turn it on, fill the tank (only takes 3-4 minutes), turn it OFF, and have plenty of silent air for most of my airbrushing sessions. (Leave it on and it will cycle back on when the pressure drops to IIRC 75 PSI, but 75 PSI is WAY more than you need for airbrushing, typically somewhere in the 20-35 PSI range, and the full tank will put out that pressure for many, many minutes.) The thing has been troublefree for 16 years and if it blew up tomorrow, I'd go buy another one. I've often said that the day I brought it home was the happiest day of my adult modeling life. 

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Stay away from the masters airbrush they work for so long than not can`t get parts for it ever that compressor with it would be great if your doing peoples nails but not for models

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I guess the question becomes, how many times do you want to buy a compressor and airbrush?  Buying a cheap tool several times to "upgrade" can be more costly and frustrating than spending the money on a top quality tool up front.  After 50+ years of building stuff, I have learned this the hard way.  Will you be leaving the hobby soon?  If not, you will grow into a good airbrush and compressor.  This applies to other tools a well.  

  As an example,  10 years ago, I bought a Sherline lathe thinking it would be a cool tool to make a few parts.  Over time, it has become a go to tool for a lot of things.  I found I can repair things around the house.  I have made parts for my car and lawnmower with it.  That was never the intention but having a quality tool inspires creativity and encourages you to use it.  The frustration of a cheap airbrush and compressor may just sour you on using it and your skills may stagnate.  Think about your long term goal as a modeler. 

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Paasche H airbrush and a Harbor Freight compressor to start.

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2 hours ago, Miatatom said:

Paasche H airbrush and a Harbor Freight compressor to start.

You couldn't go wrong with that combination, and it could last you for decades. 

I finally bought a Paasche H last month--on closeout at Hobby Lobby for just $25! :blink: Haven't used it yet but I'm looking forward to it. 

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4 hours ago, Snake45 said:

You couldn't go wrong with that combination, and it could last you for decades. 

I finally bought a Paasche H last month--on closeout at Hobby Lobby for just $25! :blink: Haven't used it yet but I'm looking forward to it. 

If you do buy a Paasche H, understand that there are 3 different tips that it can use. I have all 3 but seem to use the #5 most of the time.

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