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I'm building  my Father-law's 60 chevy. It has a padded dash and I'd like to replicate it. I have not found a small enough grain to duplicate this. Any ideas? Thanks, John

Edited by gearhedjon

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I have 2 suggestions, 

1. Try the old dry spray from a distance for texture and light sanding to knock down the high spots. OR...

2. Use unprimed lacquer crazing to your advantage. Mask off everything you don't want to have vinyl texture, and spray the lacquer paint to MAKE the texture you want. Paint the dash the correct color afterwards. 

Best wishes. 

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Thank you for your reply. How do I use the lacquer crazing method? Any lacquer paint? How do I get the paint to craze? Thanks, John

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Also take a look at some of the suede, hammertone, granite, etc texture paint from Tremclad, Rustoleom, Krylon. Find one with he texture you a looking for an give it a light coat, then paint the color you want. I have used this to replicate vinyl tops, wrinkle black finish on valve covers, seat texture.

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I might add that if your trying the lac. method, experiment on something you might not need, the results can vary from good to not .

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Actually in either 25th or 24th scale you couldn't see the grain in a padded dash without a magnifying glass. If you could....it would be wildly out of scale. 

Try using a heavy coat of semi gloss paint.

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On 9/18/2018 at 6:40 AM, gearhedjon said:

Thank you for your reply. How do I use the lacquer crazing method? Any lacquer paint? How do I get the paint to craze? Thanks, John

You know,  automotive touch up paint. The kind that always ruins the bodies when you don't want it to.

Practice on something else first.

Spray light coats from a distance to test for texture. The heavier you spray or the more coats you use, the more inconsistent it will be. Don't use this for the color, only for the texture. You can sand down some of the texture before painting. Spray enamel or acrylic paint for the final finish.

Hope this helps. 

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I have done this a time or two when I need some texture.  Paint the object.   Let paint cure for a few minutes or seconds - depends on paint.  Then touch it.  Leave a fingerprint.  Then jsut tap it lightly with your finger tip to dull the paint down and add a texture to it.   keep adding fingerprints til it's jsut texture and not fingerprints.   Takes some experimentation, but will work.   Can do this on any object.  I have used it to cover a glue seam on raqnsmission as well.   If the seam doesn't compleately disapppear, tap the wet paint enough to help obscure the seam.   Doesn't work on shiny parts though - they still have to be sanded to get rid of seams.  

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Thank you very much for your replies. I am currently trying a different approach tell me what you think. My wife uses hair spray in the bathroom, it leaves a residue on the counter. It has a little texture. Nothing huge but you can feel it. We tried it on a painted surface and painted over it too. You can feel it but it's not really visible like a rough orange peel texture. What do you guys think? I'll try this and your suggestions and compare them. Results to follow. Thanks, John

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