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aurfalien

Scriber alternatives

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Hi,

I've been eye balling the Scale Motorsports scriber set but there shipping is absurdly high being almost the same cost as the product itself.

The dental scrapers seem like they may work and look similar to solutions offered by BMF and MicroMark.

Has any one used dental scrapers as panel scribers?

I've used the UMM scriber UMM-01 model and was also looking at there newer UMM-02 version which is smaller.

 

 

 

Edited by aurfalien

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My scribing tools:

  • back edge of a #11 blade
  • razor saw
  • photoetch saws and scribes
  • mechanical pencil with straight pin (head cutoff) replacing the lead

DSCN2148

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56 minutes ago, aurfalien said:

Has any one used dental scrapers as panel scribers?

 

I have, and it works okay, but I always go back to my standard backside of a well-used Xacto #11 blade. 

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I have been using the dental style scribers for a few years now and like them better than the #11 blade. On very faint trim moldings on a model body I may start to outline the molding with a #11 and then move to the scriber. The scriber works best for door or trunk opening lines. I cut those very deep since they will be partially filled with primers and paint in the building of the model. I have used the scribers to open the grills on several kits instead of just a black wash. The grill on the '37 Ford pick-up will take an hour or more if your hand gets sore.  

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Check out scribing tools`at UMM-USA . There are stainless scribers from Hauler which I use and recommend. John Vojtech also makes his own scribing tools, which are excellent:

image.jpeg.93436a669bcf707e2531458437041755.jpeg

 

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Here is Tamiya's new "engraving" tool reviewed.  This is a very nice tool to scribe straight lines with a square bottom.  I got a full set from Hobby Link Japan and they are not for the builder without substantial resources. The blades are expensive because they are solid carbide and will hold an edge for a long time.  You don't need to spend the money for a holder as a standard pin vice will hold them.  I have a large pin vice which gives me a very nice grip with the knurling on the side.  Like the review says, the perfect scriber is a holy grail sort of thing.  Always looking for the ideal tool.  I have drawer full of them.  So far the Umm-usa are my favorites, but if you need to control the width of the groove and want a flat bottom, they the Tamiya may be worth the price. 

 

 

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I highly recommend the UMM-USA tools. I''ve got a drawer full of other types, and always go back to the UMM-USA scribers.

Edited by porschercr

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Someone brought in a selection of chisels as these are called, to a model club meeting.  I've looked ever since online, and they are usually out of stock!  Then I forget....

I'm tempted to make my own, using the disk on the Dremel, and make the hook.  So what if it wears out, eh?

Thanks for starting this topic.  Will stay tuned.

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Hi and thank you all for posting.

The Tamiya seems... well... meh, especially for the price.

I think the UMM seems best over all and I will probably go with the SCR-002.  That with an Olfa blade should give me a nice toolset for scribing.

 

 

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My scriber?  For me, nothing beats a modified razor saw blade (sans handle) for scribing straight lines.  For curves, I draw out the curve on the body shell with a .5mm mechanical pencil, then use the "heel" (rear end of the razor saw blade) and carefully draw it toward me, using just the last tooth, around that curve then simply repeat the process.  Been doing it that way for nearly 50 years.

Art

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6 hours ago, aurfalien said:

Hi and thank you all for posting.

The Tamiya seems... well... meh, especially for the price.

I think the UMM seems best over all and I will probably go with the SCR-002.  That with an Olfa blade should give me a nice toolset for scribing.

 

 

I concur with your assessment of the Tamiya on the price but...I had occasion today to use it and it was the only one of the 10 or so scribers I have that would work.  I had to clear some glue out from between two white metal parts so a part could be replaced.  It is too complicated to explain here, but the tiny size of the head that the fact that I could get it right on the edge of a joint and make a flat bottomed groove made it indispensable.  Yes, I use UMM as the first thing I pickup to scribe but these have a special place in my tool set.  Would I suggest them as the first and only tool in the box.  Heck no!  The UMM is too versatile, but I will guarantee you that someday you will need this or something like it if you build enough models so don't dismiss it out of hand. Remember, He who dies with the most tools wins!:lol:  

P.S. It would be fun after I am gone and my kids go through my tools to see them look at each other and say -"What the heck is this for??"

Edited by Pete J.

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9 hours ago, Pete J. said:

I concur with your assessment of the Tamiya on the price but...I had occasion today to use it and it was the only one of the 10 or so scribers I have that would work.  I had to clear some glue out from between two white metal parts so a part could be replaced.  It is too complicated to explain here, but the tiny size of the head that the fact that I could get it right on the edge of a joint and make a flat bottomed groove made it indispensable.

Could you have used something like scriber blades like those offered by Scale Motorsports or a scribing needle like Flex-I-File scriber needles?

9 hours ago, Pete J. said:

Yes, I use UMM as the first thing I pickup to scribe but these have a special place in my tool set.  Would I suggest them as the first and only tool in the box.  Heck no!  The UMM is too versatile, but I will guarantee you that someday you will need this or something like it if you build enough models so don't dismiss it out of hand.

I agree.  My current situation is such that I have to start over and rebuild a solid tool set foundation.  But as I progress, I'm sure to get niche/specific use products.

9 hours ago, Pete J. said:

Remember, He who dies with the most tools wins!:lol:  

Agreed, and model kits too :)

 

 

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1 hour ago, aurfalien said:

Could you have used something like scriber blades like those offered by Scale Motorsports or a scribing needle like Flex-I-File scriber needles?

 

 

 

No, it was the top of a block with a locating pin about 1/8" in diameter and a tab the same size with a small area between.  I needed the area between them to be flat to fit the locating holes.  I tried my UMM but it wouldn't get between the two pieces.  The .5mm blade was just the right size.  A wedge shaped scribers or pointed scribers  would not have worked to make a smooth flat bottom.  The flat part is important to maximize the contact area for gluing.  This is holding a landing gear in place on a very heavy(all photoetched and white metal) 1:32 scale aircraft. Has to be done right. 

Would I have spent $150(US full retail) on this tool just to do this?  Oh heck no, but I was glad I had it.  It did exactly what I wanted.  Like most tools, once you own it, you find uses for it.  It really doesn't replace other tools, but is complements my collection of scribers nicely. 

Do you need it?  At about $175 for the full set, it is very low on most  lists of must have tools.  I can see buying one or two blades and using them with your pin vise. If you have to have the full set,  can be had with all five blades and the handle for about $95 from Hobbylink Japan.  At that price it is still not cheap, but that is an individual choice.  

Edited by Pete J.

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On 11/27/2018 at 10:17 AM, SfanGoch said:

Check out scribing tools`at UMM-USA . There are stainless scribers from Hauler which I use and recommend. John Vojtech also makes his own scribing tools, which are excellent:

Yup. I needs a set of these. Few years back, there was a master aircraft modeler who had posted the best YooToob scribing video I've ever seen (or imagine ever I will). It's gone now, but the guy had ground some tools very similar to these from hard tool-steel stock, and was very good at explaining and showing how to use them, in both directions, and on a variety of shapes and surfaces.

The idea of having a tip that's considerably thinner than the old standard (but fat) #11 blade or razor saw, and will pull a nice "curl" on the backstroke, has much appeal.

The last significant scribing job I did using a razor saw was just barely acceptable from my perspective. Not blaming the tool, but something that is better suited to the job would certainly be easier to get good results with, consistently.

Edited by Ace-Garageguy

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Bill, dollars to donuts it was John Vojtech, owner of UMM-USA. His instructional videos are still up on Youtube. Here's one:

I also like the stainless scribers made by Hauler, HQT004

image.jpeg.43a22f879195d33ae85b76bac72e7b3b.jpeg

The scribers are only .18mm thick.

Edited by SfanGoch

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It is curious the individual tastes for tools of this nature. I purchased a UMM SCR-02 scriber last year on a recommendation from a forum member, but found it to be a waste of money. I tried it several times but it just wasn't the tool for me. I also found the quality of manufacture to be only fair.

I used the BMF scriber for many years, and it is a good and effective tool, and holds an edge surprisingly well, but the score lines are a bit too wide for some purposes. I still use it when a wide scribe is needed. I considered grinding it narrower but instead found a couple of dental picks with a very good scribing profile, and much narrower than the BMF scriber. I few minutes with a stone and the dental pick was converted into a great scriber with good control.

However, my favourite scriber is one I cut out of a discarded Exacto blade. The blade was ground narrow at the cutting tip and a cutting edge was formed that pulls a wonderful curl and leaves a nice square bottom to the groove. I turns corners well also. The blade has a 1" long piece of heat shrink tuning applied to the tang to act as a handle, keeping it short and light, like a pin-stripers paint brush, for good control. I'd love post a photo to illustrate but don't have that ability at this time.

 

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To each, his own. I have the UMM SCR-01/02/03 set and they suit my requirements. I also use the Hauler set I posted above. UMM also makes an ultra-thin scriber which is only .15mm thick, matching the blade kerf of their universal razor saws.

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Kinda wanting something for this evening, and having found several of these hooked blades that I've never used, I'm experimenting with grinding the tips to get that nice fine curl as mentioned above.

I have, by the way, found this design blade to be good to use for opening doors and decklids, or for starting curved lines to be scribed deeper with a different tool. Possibly because of the way my own particular fingers and wrists are hinged, these work better for me for following curves than a standard straight-tip X-Acto blade.

image.jpeg.83dc154ba2867e2f3c0d99504fca23b0.jpeg

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49 minutes ago, Ace-Garageguy said:

Kinda wanting something for this evening, and having found several of these hooked blades that I've never used, I'm experimenting with grinding the tips to get that nice fine curl as mentioned above.

I have, by the way, found this design blade to be good to use for opening doors and decklids, or for starting curved lines to be scribed deeper with a different tool. Possibly because of the way my own particular fingers and wrists are hinged, these work better for me for following curves than a standard straight-tip X-Acto blade.

image.jpeg.83dc154ba2867e2f3c0d99504fca23b0.jpeg

Hi Bill,

Would you mind measuring the base of these nice looking curved blades?

Hoping they are no taller then 6mm.

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19 minutes ago, aurfalien said:

...Would you mind measuring the base of these nice looking curved blades?

Hoping they are no taller then 6mm.

Sorry. The #28 blade fits the wider handle (approx. 9mm slot)

I also found these Excel blades in the bought-but-never-used tool stash. They take a specific handle and won't work in X-Actos, but the steel is absolutely gorgeous, looks to be higher quality (more chrome in it) than X-Acto blades. It looks like genuine "surgical" steel.

                               Excel 5-Piece Assorted Carving Blades

 

Edited by Ace-Garageguy

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Joe, I'd looked at that particular video recently. They look good, but the things this other guy were using were thinner, and produced a curl without displacing (raising) material on either side of the scribed line. He kinda made a bog deal of that fact, and after watching and trying various tools, I understood his point.

Naturally, how much material is displaced is partially an effect of technique. 

EDIT: I found it. It went back up in February. The guy's name is Paul Budzik. I posted the vid below.

Edited by Ace-Garageguy

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9 minutes ago, Ace-Garageguy said:

Sorry. The #28 blade fits the wider handle (approx. 9mm slot)

I also found these Excel blades in the bought-but-never-used tool stash. They tale a specific handle and won't work well in X-Actos, but the steel is absolutely gorgeous, looks to be higher quality (more chrome in it) than X-Acto blades. It looks like genuine "surgical" steel.

                               Excel 5-Piece Assorted Carving Blades

 

Those do look nice.

I wonder how wide they are, as they seem to look narrower.  My Olfa takes 6mm tall blades, hoping these would work.

Edited by aurfalien

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4 minutes ago, aurfalien said:

Those do look nice.

I wonder how wide they are, as they seem to look narrower.  My Olfa takes 6mm tall blades, hoping these would work.

The handle end of the Excels is about 8.5mm X .84mm (.335" X .032").

They're about 2.25" long overall (about 57.5mm).

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I found the video I think is the best out there. Paul Budzik. It was gone for a while, but it looks like it went back up in February.

 

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This is something else I just found. Looks like a real winner, and has tips available in several sizes.

Looks like it's the same idea as the Tamiya tools shown above.

Mr. Line Chisel, from Mr. Hobby

71DeBwCiV-L._SL1500_.jpg        Image result for Japanese scribers called "BMC"

Edited by Ace-Garageguy

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