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Jeffcad

1960 Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz

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Hi everyone,

Here's a 1960 Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz Convertible. This beautiful resin kit was created by Shawn Carpenter, based and converted from the Monogram-Revell 59 Eldorado. I built it at least 10 years ago. This is an extremely rare kit and at the time of purchase, it was already hard to find. Although she's presentable, that Cadillac will receive a complete restauration, as my skills were so-so back then.  Need a new paint, clear coat, cleaned windshield and new bare metal trims. I don't have any further informations on Shawn Carpenter nor its creations so if anyone of you have some, please feel free to share. Hope you'll like the pics. Cheers.

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Nice!

I would love to get my hands on one of these!

Or better yet, Revell could do a little re-tooling on the Monogram '59.

I'm a little surprised that they never did that considering the popularity of the '59.

 

 

Steve

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She's a beauty, for sure.

And if she were available in styrene, I'd HAVE to have a couple. Are you listening Revell? 

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2 hours ago, Ace-Garageguy said:

She's a beauty, for sure.

And if she were available in styrene, I'd HAVE to have a couple. Are you listening Revell? 

A better looking car than the '59 IMO.

 

Steve

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Oh yeah! That's a beautiful beast there! :wub:

4 hours ago, StevenGuthmiller said:

A better looking car than the '59 IMO.

 

Steve

1960 models were the very beginning of Bill Mitchell taking the reins and FINALLY getting rid of the crazy excesses of Harley Earl. Even the chrome was very much diminished and when the '61's appeared, folks knew that there was a DEFINITE change at GM.

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I would have thought that the '60 Cadillac would have been a natural follow up to Revell's '59 but no.

With the way things are going there now, I doubt we ever see such a model sadly.

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2 minutes ago, MrObsessive said:

I would have thought that the '60 Cadillac would have been a natural follow up to Revell's '59 but no.

With the way things are going there now, I doubt we ever see such a model sadly.

Unfortunately, you're probably correct.

There is a vast sea of opportunities that never took place with AMT, Monogram & Revell.

There were a couple that took the next obvious step like the Monogram '65 Impala morphing into the '66, but when I think of the ones that got away, it saddens me a bit.

Things like The '60 Eldorado, a '59 Edsel from the AMT '58, a '58 and '59 Chrysler 300 from the '57, and a '68 Impala from the '67, just to name a few.

 

Steve

 

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I thought there would be further iterations of the 300, but maybe the sales didn't warrant it.  The '60 Eldorado seems like a no brainer, but you would have to tool up a different body and interior.  The Edsel was quite different from '58 to '59, and from '59 to '60.  Unfortunately, most people under age 50 haven't even seen one, much less be able to relate to one.  Again, you would have to tool up a new body and interior.  It's the same story on the Impala.  I think all of Steve's suggestions would be great, but those of us who would be interested are dying out.  I'm tired of the same Camaros, Chevelles, and Mustangs.  There are plenty of cars that haven't been kitted that would sell decently to justify the development costs.

I recently bought the Craftsman version of the '59 Edsel since I didn't want a warped promo.  I'm buying older kits since I've pretty much given up on seeing new kits of cars I like.       

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1 minute ago, Motor City said:

I thought there would be further iterations of the 300, but maybe the sales didn't warrant it.  The '60 Eldorado seems like a no brainer, but you would have to tool up a different body and interior.  The Edsel was quite different from '58 to '59, and from '59 to '60.  Unfortunately, most people under age 50 haven't even seen one, much less be able to relate to one.  Again, you would have to tool up a new body and interior. 

That's always the same story whenever they use an older kit to tool a new kit, and they do it all of the time.

It's a lot cheaper to tool up a new body, a few chrome pieces and possibly a few interior pieces and re-use the entire chassis and drive train than to tool an all new kit.

Revell/Monogram have done it numerous times with the tri-five Chevies, the '59 & '60 Impalas, and the '65 & '66 Impalas, just as examples.

AMT crafted new bodies and such frequently as well.

Moebius has also used this formula with kits like the '52-'54 Hudsons & the '55 & '56 Chrysler 300s.

I understand that depending on the circumstances the companies might have felt that the market was not large enough to justify the changes, but in other circumstances it just seems like someone just plain dropped the ball.

Does anybody think that the AMT '67 Impala was not a successful kit?

I can't imagine that every classic car modeler would not have snapped up a bunch of '68 Impalas as well.

Seems like a big lost opportunity.

The '60 Cadillac is another one in this category, and I've been lobbying for further kits rooted in the Moebius Chrysler 300 line since the '56 came out.

There are probably a minimum of a half dozen other subjects that could come from those kits as well.

 

Steve

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6 hours ago, StevenGuthmiller said:

That's always the same story whenever they use an older kit to tool a new kit, and they do it all of the time.

It's a lot cheaper to tool up a new body, a few chrome pieces and possibly a few interior pieces and re-use the entire chassis and drive train than to tool an all new kit.

Revell/Monogram have done it numerous times with the tri-five Chevies, the '59 & '60 Impalas, and the '65 & '66 Impalas, just as examples.

AMT crafted new bodies and such frequently as well.

Moebius has also used this formula with kits like the '52-'54 Hudsons & the '55 & '56 Chrysler 300s.

I understand that depending on the circumstances the companies might have felt that the market was not large enough to justify the changes, but in other circumstances it just seems like someone just plain dropped the ball.

Does anybody think that the AMT '67 Impala was not a successful kit?

I can't imagine that every classic car modeler would not have snapped up a bunch of '68 Impalas as well.

Seems like a big lost opportunity.

The '60 Cadillac is another one in this category, and I've been lobbying for further kits rooted in the Moebius Chrysler 300 line since the '56 came out.

There are probably a minimum of a half dozen other subjects that could come from those kits as well.

 

Steve

I agree with you, Steve (except for buying multiple '68 Impalas as one is enough for me).  Moebius is trying by coming out with three different years and body styles of the Hudson.  I hoped for a Hollywood hardtop by now, but they came out with a '54 coupe instead.  In retrospect, it would have been better if Moebius had done the '57 300 instead of AMT as I would have expected '58, '59 and '60 variations to have followed, and possibly '61 and '62. 

Younger people seem to like the early Camaros and Mustangs.  Lots of people on this forum like the special cars done by dealers (Yenko, Tasca, etc.).  I have no interest in them whatsoever as I never saw them on the street, but apparently they sell, so we get more of the same.  

After some gaps were filled ('65, '66 & '67 Chevelle SS 396, '66 & '68 El Camino, '66 & '67 442, '69 & '72 H/O, '65 Cyclone, '65 Satellite, '67 GTX & Coronet R/T) has the well run dry?  There just aren't enough passionate people running the model car companies to try more cars of the '70s and '80s, or newer.  Revell came out with the '70 Torino GT, which I bought, then later the Starsky & Hutch Torino.  Wouldn't a Ranchero XL ('67) or GT ('68-'79) sell?  What about the '68-'69 Cyclone GT?  Especially with the '69, there are multiple versions that could be done (Spoiler, Cyclone II, Yarborough Special).  The '77-'79 Thunderbird and Cougar XR-7 were quite popular.  We're still waiting for '66 Satellite and Coronet 500 models, '64 & '65 442, and some Buick Gran Sports.  Then there are the large, bucket seat models that have never been done ('62 & '70 XL, '67 and '68 Mercury,'62 & '63 Grand Prix and Wildcat, '64-'66 Starfire, '69-'71 Sport Fury & 300, '67 & '68 Monaco, and others).  What about the '71-'76 GM wagons with the disappearing tailgate?  The only accurate '73-'77 GM intermediate has been the '73 Cutlass S.  Even the '74 Cutlass S started out as a 442, then was messed up, and the '75 Cutlass grille is totally wrong.  The '76 or '77 Monte Carlo model was somewhat crude.

As Bill and Steve mention, the basic engine and chassis can be used on multiple kits, and so can the glass.  The bodies, interiors, grilles, bumpers and taillights differ, but with 3D printing, it shouldn't cost a fortune to design these parts.  I just don't get it.    

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I think this game of variations has become a very safe bet for the resin casters; I would be much less surprised to see the aforementioned Rancheros done by the cottage industry. Just needs to be done with the care and talent that has gone into the Crown Vic and four-door Nova we're getting now.

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On 1/12/2019 at 9:57 PM, StevenGuthmiller said:

A better looking car than the '59 IMO.

 

Steve

Agreed. An improved refinement of the signature style.

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I built a Shawn Carpenter 62 Grand Prix  conversion on the AMT Catalina kit.  His resin was excellent and I regret I never bought his 69 Chevelle SS post body he had at the time.   As I start working on the AMT 69 Chevelle now with the awful 68 moldings that must come off I could kick myself.  Anyhow the Cadillac is beautiful.  

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On 1/12/2019 at 4:19 PM, Jeffcad said:

Hi everyone,

Here's a 1960 Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz Convertible. Although she's presentable, that Cadillac will receive a complete restauration, as my skills were so-so back then.  Need a new paint, clear coat, cleaned windshield and new bare metal trims. 

 

 

 

Back to the subject at hand...

Jeff, you note that you are planning to re-do the paint. If you are planning to remove the old paint be careful what you use to remove it. Castrol Super Clean and many other paint removers commonly used in our hobby can damage resin. Do you remember what type of paint you used the first time. that could help us help you figure out the best method of removal, assuming that's the way you're heading.

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Testors ELO doesn't damage resin if used properly. I've used it to remove enamels and lacquers from resin without any deleterious side effects to the parts. Just brush the stuff on, wait until the paint wrinkles, scrub, reapply if necessary. DO NOT immerse the parts in it.

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5 hours ago, Mr. Metallic said:

Back to the subject at hand...

Jeff, you note that you are planning to re-do the paint. If you are planning to remove the old paint be careful what you use to remove it. Castrol Super Clean and many other paint removers commonly used in our hobby can damage resin. Do you remember what type of paint you used the first time. that could help us help you figure out the best method of removal, assuming that's the way you're heading.

Hi Craig ! Thank you so much for your help. I am quite sure it was a basic white spray from Tamiya. And the layers were quite thin. Nothing fancy here. I will also have to remove the paint on 2 other rare Cadillacs from my collection, a 1960 Eldorado Brougham from Modelhaus and a R&R 1962 Coupe deVille. If you have good advices, it's really appreciated. I never had to remove a paint from a resin nor a plastic model before, and, because those kits are scarce, I don't want to ruin them.

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5 hours ago, SfanGoch said:

Testors ELO doesn't damage resin if used properly. I've used it to remove enamels and lacquers from resin without any deleterious side effects to the parts. Just brush the stuff on, wait until the paint wrinkles, scrub, reapply if necessary. DO NOT immerse the parts in it.

Thanks for the advice Joe !

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16 hours ago, Jeffcad said:

 

Tamiya lacquer sprays can typically be removed with 90% alcohol. You may be ok to soak resin in it, but test if possible on a small disposable part 

Edit- like I said, you MAY be ok to soak it. I've soak resin in alcohol before, but just overnight, but apparently other have had issues. Others also say CSC is fine, but I have had it destroy resin. So, test if possible with any method.

BTW, CSC won't help you with Tamiya or Testors lacquers. I've soaked items painted with them for weeks in CSC and it doesn't touch them.

Edited by Mr. Metallic
updated information

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DON’T put a resin model in alcohol.  I found out the hard way when I ruined a Modelhaus resin body.  It stripped the Tamiya paint but left the body looking like a potato chip.

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28 minutes ago, Curt said:

DON’T put a resin model in alcohol.  I found out the hard way when I ruined a Modelhaus resin body.  It stripped the Tamiya paint but left the body looking like a potato chip.

I have not tried alcohol, but have heard the same thing.

I have soaked resin in Super Clean and have never experienced any damage, but all resins are not created equal.

 

 

Steve

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As a die hard 1960 Cadillac fan, in the real world it appears most enthusiasts want the 1959 version, breaking(parting out as the US say) 1960 cars to keep 59s on the road. I know a few owners in the UK but have never known anyone to break a 59 to save a 60. Most of it is the same but not every thing especially the floorpan and transmission casing as you can change a 60 trans into a 59 but not a 59 into a 60 and some other related parts.

In the model world we can do what we want though it would be interesting in how may builders would like a 1959 vs a 1960. Many on here would like the 60 especially me, though I would prefer the hardtop to the convertible.

A great project and I'd love to see the finished model :)

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