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New to the board. I haven’t built models since I was a kid (20+ years) and just came back to the hobby. I used to paint my bodies with a brush (I’m sure we all know how that goes). I’ve started painting this body with aerosol and I’ve been getting little dust particles in the paint. Can anyone help me work out a way to keep dust out for a nice clean paint job?

Edited by Swamp_thngSFB

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Here's a few things I do:

Wipe the body down with rubbing alcohol swabs immediately before paint, make sure you're wearing nitrile gloves for every step during and after wipe-down.

Use a proper tack cloth before spraying anything. Go over it twice but don't linger in any one spot or the resin from the cloth may transfer to the body.

Don't be roaming all over the place during painting time. The less you move, the less you stir up dust. The less you handle the parts, the cleaner the job will be.

Paint School 101: Most of the dirt in any paint job comes from the painter.

 

Obviously you don't want to paint in a filthy environment, or in a wind storm, or with people wandering around the place. Or anywhere there are cats... A dedicated room or paint booth is ideal, but not always possible so you gotta make the best of what you have.

I paint in my dirt floor garage, while standing close enough to the open door to vent the fumes, and 99% of my paint work is virtually spotless. It's all about knowing what not to do...

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If you use an old coat hanger to hold your model when you paint, hang it upside down to dry on a cloths line etc..Dust falls and doesn't go up hill..

 

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One of my most frustrating aspects!  I built a paint booth in my detached office, essentially a tiny closet, so that helps, since the cats are in the house.  But I've found that static cling is an issue, must wear cotton clothing, or nothing (yea I've tried that LOL), never wear polyester.  Reminds me, I should wipe down that room down, it's been awhile.  As said above, the less movement prior, the better.  I've also found that resin has more of a static charge.  But I live in Arizona, humidity is usually really low (not lately).  When I have a critical paint job to do, I even take a shower just beforehand, your hair and body collects stuff during the day.  My two cents, I still suck at getting perfect paint jobs.

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It may sound pretty amateurish, but after I have my parts washed and mounted for painting, right before the paint starts flying, I blow off the surfaces as hard as I can with my mouth without spitting all over it! :D

Sounds kind of stupid, but I haven't had dirt issues for years since I started doing this.

I suppose a guy could do the same thing with your compressor hose, but I like to have the air brush all dialed in and ready in hand, blow off any dust, throw on my mask, and then immediately start painting before any more dust has a chance to settle.

Works well for me. ;)

 

Steve

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4 hours ago, StevenGuthmiller said:

 I blow off the surfaces as hard as I can with my mouth without spitting all over it! :D

I do the same thing with my airbrush right before I attach the paint cup or bottle.

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Image result for tack cloth

Along with all of these tips,

I also LIGHTLY rub the piece down with a corner of a tack cloth...

 

 

oh ya..and shave all dogs and cats within the area...:lol::lol::lol:

Edited by Belugawrx

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I use canned air to blow off the model immediately before applying paint. No spit issues (don't ask.)

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1 hour ago, TomZ said:

I use canned air to blow off the model immediately before applying paint. No spit issues (don't ask.)

Sounds like a good idea!  Yea I know, after 5 decades I still don't think about clearing my mouth before blowing on anything.  :P

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Even after careful prepping, dust still has a way of finding your model.

My problem usually is during the clearing of the model. It’s the small fibers along with dust that gets me frustrated. 

What I do while painting and clearing, is lay down super light,  mist coats. After the first coat is dry, you can inspect the paint with a magnifying visor, or readers, for small pieces of dust, hair, fibers, etc. At this point,  you can easily remove any foreign debris from the paint and clear, either with a glove covered finger, or some 3200 sandpaper, if needed. And I do this after every coat. My main goal, is to not let a heavy wet coat cover and imbed any debris, as it becomes more difficult  to remove. Removing any “junk” as soon as the light coat dries, keeps you one step ahead of removing it from your paint job. 

And never rush a paint job. Allow however long it takes to get it right. 

I try to paint when I first enter the room, as not to stir up any dust, as compared to me being in the room for any given time when it could have dust floating all over the place just from my moving around.

Edited by Brutalform

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I wonder if a furnace filter in back of a box fan might work.... Just spray the in going side of the filter with???? some sort of light tacky glue to grab the dust particles.... Run the fan for about 10 minutes before you spray your model parts... Sounds corny don't it????.. 🙄🤔👎👍👎???

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5 hours ago, Deuces said:

I wonder if a furnace filter in back of a box fan might work.... Just spray the in going side of the filter with???? some sort of light tacky glue to grab the dust particles.... Run the fan for about 10 minutes before you spray your model parts... Sounds corny don't it????.. 🙄🤔👎👍👎???

They make filters for this that not only a tighter knit but also have a wax on them.

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Besides all the steps to remove dust of the model I mist down mt spray booth with water before I start spraying. But with all these steps sometimes some dust still manages to find its way onto the paint.

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I use a sugar soap dilution on all the surfaces near where I paint. If you mix it stronger than they recommend it provides a sticky surface that the dust will stick too and prevents dust blowing about. It also has the benefit of simply cleaning off with warm water

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I have two cheap food storage container from the dollar store, about 8"x12". I don't use the lids, but use the second container as a lid (for more height) secured with a couple small clamps. The second I'm done painting it goes in and gets covered. After a while it can go in the dehydrator. I also build in the house and paint in the garage, so this keeps snow, rain etc. off the model as I run back and forth.

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Use some kind of box or booth to spray in. Spray the entire area with water in a spray bottle. Also spray your floor and your pants if you dont mind. Basically any area you could imagine kicking up dust. For the body, wash it with water then use your airbrush or a an of duster to remove the water droplets. Then use a tack cloth to wipe anything dust that may remain. Spray the body with another pass with compressed air before painting.

Edited by DiscoRover007

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