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Hi guys,

   So I pretty much use testors contour putty (gray tube). It tends to work alright when I use it besides fact that it seems to want to start setting up quickly. I have a couple bodies I may want to mess with in the future like slightly change the look of the body which will require adding some styrene and putty. My question is any suggestions other then testors contour putty that would be good for body work that preferably something I don't have to mix and will smooth easily and doesn't crack and will work on styrene obviously.

    Thanks 

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I've had good luck with Squadron white putty, have used the green long time ago.  Decades ago someone suggested auto body glazing putty, it was blue, giant tube could have lasted several lifetimes, but it went bad and I wasted 98% of it.  Last thing I would use is Testors.

Don't use tube cement to glue the styrene on, it will shrink/melt over time.

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I like Bondo for putty and just used some yesterday.

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Tamiya putty works really great. I like their much better than Testors or Bondo but for more dense and sturdier fixes I also use two part milliput 

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I know you don't want a 2 part putty, but there are a few good reasons to use them.

Many putties that set through evaporation of a solvent can shrink over time. When used on plastic, some of these products that use "hot" solvents (such as xylene, toluene, methyl ethyl ketone etc.) can soften the areas around/underneath where body work has been done. Solvent based putties can shrink over time as the solvent keeps evaporating, which isn't a huge problem if you keep applications thin and allow those solvents to gas out before doing your finish sanding and sealing the worked surface. I've had the problem with Sqaudron putties when used beyond just a slight skim coat, as well as with automotive putties having similar composition. Thicker layers of this stuff can take weeks to fully dry.

If you'll be applying putty to larger areas to feather it into surrounding panels, or will need to use thick layers of putty to build up and blend areas, 2 part polyester putties are well worth the added hassle it takes to mix them in appropriate ratios before applying to your model- once catalyzed, they don't shrink, and can be worked, sanded and painted remarkably quickly.  I've had great luck with automotive Evercoat polyester glazing putty- while not inexpensive, you get a decent amount with a tube of hardener, and it works extremely well when the area to be puttied and surrounding areas are roughed up with heavy grit sandpaper before applying it. Evercoat smells like typical Bondo, and does throw some heat when curing, but not enough to damage anything on your model. Once cured, it can be knocked down quickly with a rough grit, and has a fine texture when you finish sand with finer grits.

^^ I haven't had a trip to a well-stocked hobby shop since seeing this post in another thread, but I will be looking to add some of this to my tool box once I find it in-stock.

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I sometimes use superglue & talcum powder for body filler, only problem I've found with it is, the longer it sits the harder it gets. I used to use superglue & baking soda, but it gives of vapours that strips kit chrome. 

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Super glue, and a product that RC aircraft modelers use, called epoxy *microballoons works great. I apply the super glue to the area needing work, then sprinkle the *EMBs over it. It sets and cures quickly, allowing you to move ahead with your work. Don Fahrni used this method. I would say that, if it's good enough for Don, it's good enough for anyone!

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I have never used them but understand micro-balloons require some caution in use!

 

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Two-part epoxy putty, such as Magic-Sculpt or Apoxie, are the best for body work (mods like widening wheel wells and fenders), filling seams, etc. They're water soluble, can be smoothed and feathered easily, don't affect styrene and don't shrink when dry. They are excellent when working with resin parts.

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17 hours ago, KBryan67 said:

Hi guys,

   So I pretty much use testors contour putty (gray tube). It tends to work alright when I use it besides fact that it seems to want to start setting up quickly. I have a couple bodies I may want to mess with in the future like slightly change the look of the body which will require adding some styrene and putty. My question is any suggestions other then testors contour putty that would be good for body work that preferably something I don't have to mix and will smooth easily and doesn't crack and will work on styrene obviously.

    Thanks 

When you start getting into modifying bodies, especially contours and such, you'll want to move into 2 part fillers. Gman gives a good explanation above. I use U-POL Dolphin Glaze (yes, weird name). I get it on eBay, and typically can find it for $20-22 including shipping. Sands well, dries quickly, and doesn't shrink.

As far as one-part fillers, switch to Tamiya grey in the tube. Feathers well, but takes several hours to harden to a sandable state. I use it for smoothing of textured ares and final surface prep before primer. It does shrink if applied to heavily, so that's why you should avoid it for heavier work. 

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Thanks for the feedback guys, much appreciated.

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Silly question I suppose, but does anyone make an equivalent to the two-part Bondo in smaller hobby sized quantities?

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18 minutes ago, oldcarfan said:

Silly question I suppose, but does anyone make an equivalent to the two-part Bondo in smaller hobby sized quantities?

I've never seen it, but, that sure would be nice!

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, oldcarfan said:

Silly question I suppose, but does anyone make an equivalent to the two-part Bondo in smaller hobby sized quantities?

Yes. It's sold in auto-parts stores in a 3-ounce tube. Comes with the right hardener. It's now my go-to filler for most work, though Joe's recommended epoxy products are very good too. It's easy to mix consistently if you think about what you're doing, and do a little measuring.

Image result for Bondo Professional glazing putty

 

DEC282014Lakester016_zpsb153fd02.jpg

Edited by Ace-Garageguy

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Posted (edited)

I second Mr. Engwer:  Bondo Pro is very easy to use; varying the mix ratio just affects hardening time - I haven't had a problem, so anyone can use it.  Be aware, it is softer than styrene, even softer than resin.

Edited by GerN

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