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    • Dave Ambrose

      Board Maintenance   03/14/2019

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Posted (edited)

Have vintage Jo-Han kit but it has a slightly warped hood. Looking for any suggestions on how to fit it.

Edited by 69NovaYenko

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Twisted, or ?

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Posted (edited)

Twisted....

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Edited by 69NovaYenko

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Posted (edited)

The first thing is, that you probably should have addressed it before paint. -_-

It's hard to tell, but it looks like it has a fairly mild twist, but a pretty pronounced bow.

You could try putting it in a tub of hot water, putting enough weight on top to press it flat, and then let it cool like that.

I haven't had a lot of luck fixing warped parts myself.

I usually just try to "massage" them out with a little careful bending if they're mild, but something this pronounced will probably require some sort of heat solution.

 

 

Steve

Edited by StevenGuthmiller

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First thing is to find the fender location,..before fitting the hood,... then come back and, under hot water, over twist, slowly, the hood and cold water stay the twist,...

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Posted (edited)
On 5/12/2019 at 3:39 PM, StevenGuthmiller said:

The first thing is, that you probably should have addressed it before paint. -_-

Steve

Steve:

This is a builder I`m attempting to rebuild; it was painted when I acquired it. :D

I assure you I would not have wasted paint nor my time to apply several color coats to it then attempt to straighten the hood on the back end!<_<

Edited by 69NovaYenko

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, 69NovaYenko said:

Steve:

This is a builder I`m attempting to rebuild; it was painted when I acquired it. :D

I assure you I would not have wasted paint nor my time to apply several color coats to it then attempt to straighten the hood on the back end!<_<

Got ya Greg.

I assumed, when I saw that the body was attached to a paint rack in the photo, that it had just been painted.

 

 

Steve

Edited by StevenGuthmiller

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On 12.5.2019 at 10:39 PM, StevenGuthmiller said:

something this pronounced will probably require some sort of heat solution.

I agree, maybe a food dehydrator could be of some use for warming up the plastic in this case. With it's possibility to create a continous and controllable temperature window, I gather this will be more effective than hot water, hairdryer etc. 

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Be careful with the food dehydrator it's just as likely to make the warp worse .

 

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Been following this topic and by no means do I have first hand experience but, considering any attempt to soften the plastic may soften the paint as well, I would think that the paint may get damaged while manipulating the plastic to straighten it out. If this was my project I think I would just strip it first then try any or all the great ideas for softening and straightening it then repaint! Just my two cents!😁

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13 hours ago, randx0 said:

Be careful with the food dehydrator it's just as likely to make the warp worse .

 

Yes, the same as you'll ALWAYS have to be, using one for this purpose. It goes without saying that a FH with temperature control and timer should be used. Low temperature setting and frequent control of the plastic's state is mandatory. 

9 hours ago, JohnU said:

Been following this topic and by no means do I have first hand experience but, considering any attempt to soften the plastic may soften the paint as well, I would think that the paint may get damaged while manipulating the plastic to straighten it out. If this was my project I think I would just strip it first then try any or all the great ideas for softening and straightening it then repaint! Just my two cents!😁

I guess the paint is not the issue here, as far as I understand, the paint was already on when he bought it, so he'll likely strip off the paint anyway...

Edited by Tommy124

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