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Straightliner59

Resistance Soldering On A Budget!

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I think this qualifies as a tip, at this point. It's well worth sharing. I had inquired about resistance soldering on another thread, as I was looking to put together a system for a little less than an American Beauty setup. That mission is mostly accomplished--I'm still collecting pieces to build the probe handpiece, but, I am up and running with tweezers. I digress. In replies to that thread, someone mentioned simply using a standard soldering gun, and cutting the wire tip, to create two "leads",  thus creating the resistance/heating. Until it was mentioned, I'd never considered that. Once it was, clearly, it's the same process as created by the commercial units. It also costs much less, and takes up less space. I received a 200/250W Weller gun  in the mail today, that I purchased for less than $40. I quickly made the modification, and gave it a shot. It works beautifully! Heats quickly, and provides the ability to maintain contact with the parts, and kill the power, to let the joint set, before moving anything. I like that! I think a 100W unit will work fine for tubing, etc., that anyone who builds1/24-1/25 scale chassis would use. Below are the results.

DSC_0002cr.jpg

DSC_0003cr.jpg

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Posted (edited)

Glad to see your system worked!  If I may make a suggestion.  I see you are trying to burn your house down. :lol:  Try Googling "honeycomb ceramic soldering board".  They are not expensive and are a great alternative to a wood or asbestos boards.  They come in a number of sizes.  I use mine with a piece of foam underneath to stick the pins in.  With the honeycomb pattern, it is easy to get things square and you have enough overlap that you can always find a way to secure the pieces.  You also don't get wood smoke in your eyes.  Hope this helps.

shopping?q=tbn:ANd9GcSQXYSInXo8bAOXFCwdji08VlSntTAJwsi8aFJ6LPN4XkS-CZAU4B1Ef6zEbe16nEHGSgrvL1pDfkuH3miDFsS72r0YKcQnaAIlzeblDuI&usqp=CAE

Edited by Pete J.

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I want to acquire something to solder on, and the ceramic has been recommended before. I will look to pick one up, soon. I have been using balsa to solder on, since the mid-'80s, and, so far, have avoided fire! :D Obviously, that doesn't mean it's the safest practice! I run the exhaust fan to evacuate smoke/fumes. All that said, thanks for the reminder, Pete. I will move one of the ceramic boards to near the top of my "to get" list.

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You could probably use a scrap of Hardie board, or Hardie siding. I found a broken piece of siding at my local Home Depot, and they just gave it to me Won't be as handy as that honeycomb board, but it's certainly good in the flammability department. 

 

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2 minutes ago, Dave Ambrose said:

You could probably use a scrap of Hardie board, or Hardie siding. I found a broken piece of siding at my local Home Depot, and they just gave it to me Won't be as handy as that honeycomb board, but it's certainly good in the flammability department. 

 

That's not a bad idea, at all!

 

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I'm terrible at trying to scale a model. I would have to have a template or drawing to make a frame or parts. I have all the tools to make something out of metal but wouldn't attempt it unless I would have something to go by for scaling it. 

Would buying a kit and using the parts to scale and build from or is there a website to get the scale and details from??

How do all that welds or solder builds go about this??

Thanks in advance for any help on this.

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26 minutes ago, retired & glad said:

I'm terrible at trying to scale a model. I would have to have a template or drawing to make a frame or parts. I have all the tools to make something out of metal but wouldn't attempt it unless I would have something to go by for scaling it. 

Would buying a kit and using the parts to scale and build from or is there a website to get the scale and details from??

How do all that welds or solder builds go about this??

Thanks in advance for any help on this.

A couple of ways I do this is 1. As you mentioned I used the Revell Street Burner '55 Chevy frame as a pattern to build a tube chassis for my Ford Escort pro-stock.  I laid it on my work table marked the wheel base for the Escort beside that frame and began cutting tubes to match the new reduced wheelbase.  2.  I acquired a scale drafting/engineer ruler many years ago.  It is triangular shaped and has, I believe 6 different scales - two on each face.  It takes a bit of getting used to and making sure you are using the correct edge, but it does the job.  The only down side is the nearest scale for our purposes is 1/24.  Hope this helps is some way.

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7 minutes ago, TarheelRick said:

2.  I acquired a scale drafting/engineer ruler many years ago.  It is triangular shaped and has, I believe 6 different scales - two on each face.  It takes a bit of getting used to and making sure you are using the correct edge, but it does the job.  The only down side is the nearest scale for our purposes is 1/24.  Hope this helps is some way.

Not anymore! Just found this on Ebay. Free shipping, even.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/1-20-1-25-1-50-1-75-1-100-1-125-Plastic-Triangular-Scale-Ruler-Measurement-Hv/273851752232?hash=item3fc2d61f28:g:Ai8AAOSwOVpXUBmE

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Just now, Straightliner59 said:

Someone must have been reading my mind when I bought mine and developed that one.  I will have to try to find one of those.  Thanks for posting it.

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2 minutes ago, TarheelRick said:

Someone must have been reading my mind when I bought mine and developed that one.  I will have to try to find one of those.  Thanks for posting it.

You know how it is: You have to expend cash, to make do, before what you really needed comes on the market. What I am saying, is that we all owe you a debt of gratitude for making this happen! :D

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Thanks Ricky and Daniel. Didn't expect a fast response. I have a bunch of scale/rulers that I'll have to dig out of the closet and see what I have on hand. If I don't have anything that will work, I'll order the one ya'll listed.

I guess the best way is take a kit and use the parts to copy with metal.

Thanks. This inspires me to give this a go and see what I can make or mess up.

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1 hour ago, Straightliner59 said:

Thanks Daniel. I just ordered one. The ones I have would probably work but why not just get what is out there now for the purpose.

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Posted (edited)

:lol:  I am that old guy in the corner chuckling!  These scales have literally been around for centuries.  I took drafting courses in college in the late 60's and buying one of each was required for the class.  Here is the history and why they are what they are. .  The one you are talking about here is an "engineers" scale.  The measurements are inches divided in 1/10's.  This gives you scales that are evenly divide in 1000  This is because engineers send plans to machinists scale plans and define the measurements in thousands of and inch. 

The other scale that you have is a "architects" scale.  The main graduations on this are feet divided in 1/12.  This is because architects design buildings and their plans are measured in feet and inches.  This scale give you scales that easily divide in 12. 

It also looks like the one you have is a metric version for 1/10s.  

So, 1:24 and 1:12 scale would be found on an architect's scale because they are factors of 12 and 1:20 and 1:25 scale would be found on an engineers scale because they are factors of 1000.  The odd fractions that you find on the ends of a architects scale are in feet to the inch.  Thus number on the scale 1/4 represents 4 feet per inch or in modeling parlance 1/24(24 inches per inch).  Most architects scales are designed for the main divisions to represent feet but have a small section on each end that are divided to show inches per inch. 

Oh and one last laugh.  When queried about the scale the instructor just laughed and said "Well that is just to confuse the uninitiated!" 

Edited by Pete J.

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2 hours ago, Pete J. said:

1:25 scale would be found on an engineers scale because they are factors of 1000

Well, what do you know? I guess I'd never seen an engineer's scale, before. I've seen plenty of architect's scales. Cool!

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Know what??  That's why I like 1/25 scale to work in.  There are 25.4 millimeters in one inch.  For practical purposes you can forget the 0.4 and just say there are 25 millimeters in an inch.  So If I have a 118 inch wheelbase on a real vehicle it is simply 118 millimeters on my metric ruler!  Things couldn't be simpler!😝

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