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misterNNL

1920's wooden car inner framework

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I knew from past model project research that most car bodies in the 1920's era were sheet metal fastened over wooden inner structures. I came across some particularly interesting images of those and decided that would make an neat model project. Using an AMT 1925 Ford model T coupe for the basic size and shape of the various parts I began cutting pieces from Bass wood sheet. Here is a photo I decided to replicate.

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My boss many years ago, had a real original 1926 Model T Ford. I walked by it many times a day for about 5 years. I went to school with his son. When he got married, they wanted to use it in the wedding. So, I got to do the refresh on it. Got new tires from Coker and had them installed on the wood wheels. Found new plugs. They are Champions and they have a screw on top. The fabric covered plug wire has a lug on the end with a hole in it and it slips over a stud on the top of the plug and a large knurled nut screws on top of the plug to hold the wire in place. Uses an updraft carb with no fuel pump. Tank held 5 gallons and was a sheet metal tank just laying in the trunk. Trunk had a wood floor with a lift up piece of wood in the floor that covered the 6 volt battery. 26 was the first year for electric start and head lights. WE rebuilt the starter, but it would never turn the engine over fast enough to start it. But, it never took me more than 3 cranks to get it to start. IT had what I called mole hair interior. String frayed looking stuff. Neat car. Wide open, 30 mph. lol That little 4 cyl probably did not make 50 hp, but it sat there and hummed like a Singer sewing machine. It was black of course.

 

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Great story D.W.

"Mole hair interior"? I never heard of that one.  Are you sure it was not mohair? Like the fabric used for  the old fashion teddy bears?

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2 hours ago, peteski said:

Great story D.W.

"Mole hair interior"? I never heard of that one.  Are you sure it was not mohair? Like the fabric used for  the old fashion teddy bears?

Mohair was very much in fashion in car interiors for a while. "mole hair" describes it well.

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I am going to pull "my hair" out if I can't figure out how to post any photos. Any suggestions?

Edited by misterNNL
My Kindle incorrectly corrected my spelling.

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hi Tom

once you sign in - that's the hard part - remembering your password ......

once you sign in and click on the comment box - it should open with a small blue underlined prompt that says "choose files"

click on that prompt and then download a photo from your computer

and away you go

I don't use the drag files feature - probably easier - but I'm still relatively clueless  .....

and I like the project idea ....

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I will be following with interest as I have 1931 Model A Woodie that I want to build with a wooden body, I found a detailed article on how to make one as a slot car that looks very useful.

 

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On 9/4/2019 at 1:32 PM, misterNNL said:

I knew from past model project research that most car bodies in the 1920's era were sheet metal fastened over wooden inner structures. I came across some particularly interesting images of those and decided that would make an neat model project. Using an AMT 1925 Ford model T coupe for the basic size and shape of the various parts I began cutting pieces from Bass wood sheet. Here is a photo I decided to replicate.

 

On 9/4/2019 at 1:32 PM, misterNNL said:

I knew from past model project research that most car bodies in the 1920's era were sheet metal fastened over wooden inner structures. I came across some particularly interesting images of those and decided that would make an neat model project. Using an AMT 1925 Ford model T coupe for the basic size and shape of the various parts I began cutting pieces from Bass wood sheet. Here is a photo I decided to replicate.

 

5 hours ago, absmiami said:

hi Tom

once you sign in - that's the hard part - remembering your password ......

once you sign in and click on the comment box - it should open with a small blue underlined prompt that says "choose files"

click on that prompt and then download a photo from your computer

and away you go

I don't use the drag files feature - probably easier - but I'm still relatively clueless  .....

and I like the project idea ....

I am unable to find a "comment box" anywhere:(

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my  bad

you open the box that says Reply to this topic

at the bottom of the box you will see a prompt that says

Drag files .... or Choose files - that's the one that I use ...

 

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On 9/8/2019 at 4:07 PM, absmiami said:

my  bad

you open the box that says Reply to this topic

at the bottom of the box you will see a prompt that says

Drag files .... or Choose files - that's the one that I use ...

 

That doesn't work at all. Still getting the exclamation point and the -200 thing. I'm evidently cursed.

Edited by misterNNL
misspelled word.

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If it helps, I have to email any phone photos to myself, so it reduces the size of the images or I can’t post either.

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I do not have or use a cell phone. All my images are taken with a Cannon Powershot camera.

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Hi Sir!

Your computer with which you interact with this very forum is likely powered by Microsoft MSDOS. In which case, you probably have WORD text processing in your tool bar.

If so, import your pics as you normally do, and then access them tru the icons that appears at the top of the page when you open them individually. It will likely offer you the option to "modify" them with the photo program included in you Microsoft software. You can then crop them, calibrate, colorize, contrast or "resize" each of those to your liking.

After the procedure, you will have the option to "save a copy" of your modified pic. Do it. It will therefore show you the original, and the modified, usually side by side. The modified will generally have the same pic ID number, followed by a (2). That one will be smaller and "lighter", and therefore, easy to load on the forum. 

Believe me, Mr. Woodruff, I am NO TECHIE... If I was able to learn it, you will most likely do faster than yours truly. 

Can't wait to see the pics. Good luck!

respectfully, CT. 

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On 9/10/2019 at 4:15 PM, misterNNL said:

I do not have or use a cell phone. All my images are taken with a Cannon Powershot camera.

See message above...

CT

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6 hours ago, Claude Thibodeau said:

Hi Sir!

Your computer with which you interact with this very forum is likely powered by Microsoft MSDOS. In which case, you probably have WORD text processing in your tool bar.

If so, import your pics as you normally do, and then access them tru the icons that appears at the top of the page when you open them individually. It will likely offer you the option to "modify" them with the photo program included in you Microsoft software. You can then crop them, calibrate, colorize, contrast or "resize" each of those to your liking.

After the procedure, you will have the option to "save a copy" of your modified pic. Do it. It will therefore show you the original, and the modified, usually side by side. The modified will generally have the same pic ID number, followed by a (2). That one will be smaller and "lighter", and therefore, easy to load on the forum. 

Believe me, Mr. Woodruff, I am NO TECHIE... If I was able to learn it, you will most likely do faster than yours truly. 

Can't wait to see the pics. Good luck!

respectfully, CT. 

Thanks Charles,I'll try to work my way through that and see what happens.

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On ‎9‎/‎4‎/‎2019 at 2:41 PM, dwc43 said:

My boss many years ago, had a real original 1926 Model T Ford. I walked by it many times a day for about 5 years. I went to school with his son. When he got married, they wanted to use it in the wedding. So, I got to do the refresh on it. Got new tires from Coker and had them installed on the wood wheels. Found new plugs. They are Champions and they have a screw on top. The fabric covered plug wire has a lug on the end with a hole in it and it slips over a stud on the top of the plug and a large knurled nut screws on top of the plug to hold the wire in place. Uses an updraft carb with no fuel pump. Tank held 5 gallons and was a sheet metal tank just laying in the trunk. Trunk had a wood floor with a lift up piece of wood in the floor that covered the 6 volt battery. 26 was the first year for electric start and head lights. WE rebuilt the starter, but it would never turn the engine over fast enough to start it. But, it never took me more than 3 cranks to get it to start. IT had what I called mole hair interior. String frayed looking stuff. Neat car. Wide open, 30 mph. lol That little 4 cyl probably did not make 50 hp, but it sat there and hummed like a Singer sewing machine. It was black of course.

 

Just to be clear here there are a number of inaccuracies here which lead me to believe this was a pretty cobbled up car.

A '26 Model T Fordor (not a typo) sedan had a gas tank under the front seat while the rest of the Improved Fords (as Ford called them) had the gas tank in the cowl area (basically in the driver's lap) The cowl gas tank holds about 9 1/2 gallons and the under seat version holds 12. Gas tanks were only in the rear part of the car when it was a home made speedster or in the case of the 1910-12 Open Runabouts or Torpedos.

The starter became available in 1919 as optional equipment and they were fairly universal by 1926, though one could still purchase a car "unequipped" with crank start, kerosene lamps (on the cowl and as a tail lamp) as well as non-demountable rims. I built a model of such a car a bit ago.

The horsepower of the 176 CID 4 was 20 hp in 1926. My Fordor has been clocked at 52 MPH with my father behind the wheel, though I have never been that brave in that car, though my Touring will go 55 pretty easily, so long as the top is down.

Mohair interiors were introduced by Ford for use in closed cars beginning in 1928. Prior to that the closed cars used a woven wool material pinstriped in white, green or red and seemed to be at the whim of the supplier, not the color of the car.

Sorry, I don't mean to tear your post up, nor do I doubt the car may have been as you describe, but I want to be accurate about how Fords really look and were equipped instead of perpetuating inaccuracies.

Attached is a photo of two of my Fords, my '26 Touring in the foreground and my '13 Touring in the background. The '26 was the 2006 winner of the Stynowski award, which is given to the best restored Ford Model T in the country.

All the best.

Eric

26_and_13_Ts.jpg

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Charles,I have looked everywhere and evidently I do not have "Word" o my system. In the past I have had people send me things that I can't open and I get a message that tells me that I can't open them because I don't have "word". Strike two! This is beginning to not be worth the effort.

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1 hour ago, misterNNL said:

Charles,I have looked everywhere and evidently I do not have "Word" o my system. In the past I have had people send me things that I can't open and I get a message that tells me that I can't open them because I don't have "word". Strike two! This is beginning to not be worth the effort.

Hi Sir!

Well, sorry to hear that. I fear we won't see the pictures...

Depending on the maker of your computer, it may very well be that instead of a Microsoft software, your computer is running on an "open" software, i.e. free software, but with different configurations. Those are surprinsingly common among people who don't require so called "state of the art" software for their usual needs. I went with Microsoft because my former line of work required it, mostly. 

And a final note: it's Claude, not Charles. No offense taken, rest assured. 

Respectfully,

CT

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I still have a set of brand new Model T plugs in the box, in my garage. Bought them new in 1988. The have pipe thread, threads on them. The whole car is just anvil simple to wrench on. I miss mine to this day. It was a 1926 Speedster, with a Rootlieb body. It had red wire wheels and no fenders. It was my daily driver from 1988 to 1990.

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7 hours ago, alexis said:

I still have a set of brand new Model T plugs in the box, in my garage. Bought them new in 1988. The have pipe thread, threads on them. The whole car is just anvil simple to wrench on. I miss mine to this day. It was a 1926 Speedster, with a Rootlieb body. It had red wire wheels and no fenders. It was my daily driver from 1988 to 1990.

That makes sense. A Rootlieb body was a fine item.

Back to the OP topic,  a '26 Fordor body, wood exposed in scale would be very interesting on, say, the AMT '27 T chassis. Another on that would be worthy would be an '11-14 Town Car on the ICM chassis. 

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9 hours ago, Claude Thibodeau said:

Hi Sir!

Well, sorry to hear that. I fear we won't see the pictures...

Depending on the maker of your computer, it may very well be that instead of a Microsoft software, your computer is running on an "open" software, i.e. free software, but with different configurations. Those are surprinsingly common among people who don't require so called "state of the art" software for their usual needs. I went with Microsoft because my former line of work required it, mostly. 

And a final note: it's Claude, not Charles. No offense taken, rest assured. 

Respectfully,

CT

Sorry about the name mistake. I do course have my pix that I will email to anyone that will PM me their email address.

Edited by misterNNL
Kindle thinks it knows what I need to say

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Claude.I just sent the photos but am not sure they went. Computers and I do not get along the best most of the time.Let me know whether or not you get them.

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41 minutes ago, misterNNL said:

Claude.I just sent the photos but am not sure they went. Computers and I do not get along the best most of the time.Let me know whether or not you get them.

Hi Sir!

Got them, loaded them, drooled over them, and responded directly about them to the email address from which you sent them to me. You should have it by now...

CT

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On 9/5/2019 at 5:32 AM, misterNNL said:

I knew from past model project research that most car bodies in the 1920's era were sheet metal fastened over wooden inner structures. I came across some particularly interesting images of those and decided that would make an neat model project. Using an AMT 1925 Ford model T coupe for the basic size and shape of the various parts I began cutting pieces from Bass wood sheet. Here is a photo I decided to replicate.

Here are the OP's original photos and the description he sent with them.

The first shows the inspiration image along with the frame under construction along with the AMT '25 model T Ford coupe I used for general size and shape of the pieces. I used a digital caliper to try to keep pieces the same size and in the right position. I made a foam buck to support the roof and side pieces straight and as square as possible. Total of 50 parts scratch made including some small brackets made from aluminum printer's plate

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