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misterNNL

1920's wooden car inner framework

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14 minutes ago, Kiwi_Bloke said:

Here are the OP's original photos and the description he sent with them.

The first shows the inspiration image along with the frame under construction along with the AMT '25 model T Ford coupe I used for general size and shape of the pieces. I used a digital caliper to try to keep pieces the same size and in the right position. I made a foam buck to support the roof and side pieces straight and as square as possible. Total of 50 parts scratch made including some small brackets made from aluminum printer's plate

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Thanks for your expert help Stewart !

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That’s a really impressive project!  Thanks for sharing the pics!

I wish I could find aluminum printer’s plate...all the print shops I’ve ever asked look at me like I’m crazy when I ask if they have any 😂

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19 minutes ago, CabDriver said:

That’s a really impressive project!  Thanks for sharing the pics!

I wish I could find aluminum printer’s plate...all the print shops I’ve ever asked look at me like I’m crazy when I ask if they have any 😂

It's now considered obsolete technology with the advent of digital stuff so unless you find who's been in the business for a long time you have a difficult time locating any.

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Mr W

thanks for being stubborn

will enjoy this

and remember: technology is your friend .... until it’s not

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8 minutes ago, oldr-n-drt said:

tom..how thick is the wood?? maybe 1/16 inch??  will it fit inside the body?? great work...oldr-n-drt

Most of the bass wood I used was 1/16th" thick as it is what I had on hand at the time and also anything any thinner would have been very fragile. I have read articles about these frame work systems and the people that rebuild the real cars have to very cautious when they replace wooden parts as there is no telling which one of at least fours body builders Ford bought from made the body you are working on. As a result there is usually a lot of cutting and fitting done on the real wooden structures. Mine is a generalization of what could have been used and not intended to be 100% accurate to any brand or manufacturer.I simply had never seen anyone else do one and thought I would build one.

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8 hours ago, misterNNL said:

It's now considered obsolete technology with the advent of digital stuff so unless you find who's been in the business for a long time you have a difficult time locating any.

Although they aren't as big, K&S has some sheet aluminum that's pretty close in thickness, although perhaps not absolute flexibility, as an offset lithography plate.

Very nice work, Tom.

Charlie Larkin

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5 hours ago, charlie8575 said:

Although they aren't as big, K&S has some sheet aluminum that's pretty close in thickness, although perhaps not absolute flexibility, as an offset lithography plate.

Very nice work, Tom.

Charlie Larkin

Thanks Charlie. I appreciate the comment. 

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On 9/4/2019 at 1:32 PM, misterNNL said:

I knew from past model project research that most car bodies in the 1920's era were sheet metal fastened over wooden inner structures. I came across some particularly interesting images of those and decided that would make an neat model project. Using an AMT 1925 Ford model T coupe for the basic size and shape of the various parts I began cutting pieces from Bass wood sheet. Here is a photo I decided to replicate.

I should have added that any and all comments are welcome including those of a critical nature. I'M a big boy and will not be crushed by what someone else thinks.

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Hi!

Glad you ultimately got your pics uploaded. Great work!

I saw very thin aluminium plates, virtually "paper" at Michael's, in the Cricut cutter aisle... They call it "embossing material". As the name implies, they might be pliable and stiff at once to fit your purpose. Some folks also use the foil that seals the cork on wine bottles, or even some tooth paste tube foil (the inside is natural alumnimium finish. Might do?

CT

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6 hours ago, Claude Thibodeau said:

Hi!

Glad you ultimately got your pics uploaded. Great work!

I saw very thin aluminium plates, virtually "paper" at Michael's, in the Cricut cutter aisle... They call it "embossing material". As the name implies, they might be pliable and stiff at once to fit your purpose. Some folks also use the foil that seals the cork on wine bottles, or even some tooth paste tube foil (the inside is natural alumnimium finish. Might do?

CT

Those, from the sounds of it, are a bit thinner than a litho plate. Quite a bit thinner, actually, but the material could still be used for something. Next time I'm near a Michael's, I'll take a look.

Charlie Larkin

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5 hours ago, charlie8575 said:

Those, from the sounds of it, are a bit thinner than a litho plate. Quite a bit thinner, actually, but the material could still be used for something. Next time I'm near a Michael's, I'll take a look.

Charlie Larkin

Hi!

Having worked in a print shop in my early years, I confirm that litho plates are a smidge thicker than those alternatives I mentionned.

I remember seeing people making hood hinges made of beer can aluminium, of all things. This Bud's for you!

CT

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I have to tell you, I keep coming back to this post over and over. This is a really excellent project. To be candid, I am a little jealous that I didn't think of it and find myself wishing this excellent piece of work was sitting on my own shelf! Now...a full detail Model T engine and a proper chassis as display pieces and you would have something unforgettable. Again, this is a really beautiful piece.

E-

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On 9/12/2019 at 10:27 PM, alexis said:

I still have a set of brand new Model T plugs in the box, in my garage. Bought them new in 1988. The have pipe thread, threads on them. The whole car is just anvil simple to wrench on. I miss mine to this day. It was a 1926 Speedster, with a Rootlieb body. It had red wire wheels and no fenders. It was my daily driver from 1988 to 1990.

Of all the styles that model T's appear in speedsters are my very favorite. Do you have photos you can post or PM me?

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2 hours ago, Eric Macleod said:

I have to tell you, I keep coming back to this post over and over. This is a really excellent project. To be candid, I am a little jealous that I didn't think of it and find myself wishing this excellent piece of work was sitting on my own shelf! Now...a full detail Model T engine and a proper chassis as display pieces and you would have something unforgettable. Again, this is a really beautiful piece.

E-

I have a detailed chassis already built up on my work bench. It is intended for a speedster so is equipped with Chevrolet disc wheels,a RAJO head,dual carbs and a two speed rear end. I may just have to set those togeather next week(on vacation a Lake Erie this week) for a photo op session. Further thought along that line tempts me to cut up that AMT '25 coupe,paint the panels bare metal and lay some of them around just for added intrest.

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5 hours ago, misterNNL said:

I have a detailed chassis already built up on my work bench. It is intended for a speedster so is equipped with Chevrolet disc wheels,a RAJO head,dual carbs and a two speed rear end. I may just have to set those togeather next week(on vacation a Lake Erie this week) for a photo op session. Further thought along that line tempts me to cut up that AMT '25 coupe,paint the panels bare metal and lay some of them around just for added intrest.

Great idea. Same for the fenders. Seriously,  this is one of the most interesting things i've seen posted here in a while.

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21 minutes ago, Eric Macleod said:

Great idea. Same for the fenders. Seriously,  this is one of the most interesting things i've seen posted here in a while.

Thanks Eric, I appreciate your kind comments.

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On 9/14/2019 at 4:16 PM, CabDriver said:

I wish I could find aluminum printer’s plate...all the print shops I’ve ever asked look at me like I’m crazy when I ask if they have any 😂

Look for aluminum flashing at a home improvement store. It can be found in 5"x7" sheets. It measures .010" before the plastic coating is sanded off. It is easily annealed, and it's easily worked. I have been using it for many things, for a lot of years, now.

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On 9/15/2019 at 8:34 PM, Claude Thibodeau said:

I remember seeing people making hood hinges made of beer can aluminium, of all things. This Bud's for you!

CT

Beer can (or soda can, depending on your preference) material would be great for a lot of stuff I do, if I could only figure out a good way to roll it back flat somehow.  Pity they don't make rectangular drinks cans :D

1 hour ago, Straightliner59 said:

Look for aluminum flashing at a home improvement store. It can be found in 5"x7" sheets. It measures .010" before the plastic coating is sanded off. It is easily annealed, and it's easily worked. I have been using it for many things, for a lot of years, now.

That's a good tip!  Thank you!!

Something like this, presumably?

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Amerimax-Aluminum-Step-Flashing-Shingle-Silver-5-in-H-x-7-in-L-x-5-in-W/372231237062?epid=1600934592&hash=item56aab5edc6:g:fpcAAOSwXJ9akLLf

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6 hours ago, CabDriver said:

Beer can (or soda can, depending on your preference) material would be great for a lot of stuff I do, if I could only figure out a good way to roll it back flat somehow.  Pity they don't make rectangular drinks cans :D

That's a good tip!  Thank you!!

Something like this, presumably?

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Amerimax-Aluminum-Step-Flashing-Shingle-Silver-5-in-H-x-7-in-L-x-5-in-W/372231237062?epid=1600934592&hash=item56aab5edc6:g:fpcAAOSwXJ9akLLf

Hi!

A friend of mine who's into the packaging industry told me the beer/soft drink cans are of the same thickness as throw-away aluminium plates you get with pies, or buns. If you find a plate that is squarish or rectangular, you will find the "floor" of the plate is made of flat and embossed (or "quilted") alternating surfaces. The flat spots should provide you with more than enough material for most 1/24 scale parts you may want to fabricate. Plus, you can trim it with typical paper scissors. 

Just a suggestion...

CT

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9 minutes ago, Claude Thibodeau said:

Hi!

A friend of mine who's into the packaging industry told me the beer/soft drink cans are of the same thickness as throw-away aluminium plates you get with pies, or buns. If you find a plate that is squarish or rectangular, you will find the "floor" of the plate is made of flat and embossed (or "quilted") alternating surfaces. The flat spots should provide you with more than enough material for most 1/24 scale parts you may want to fabricate. Plus, you can trim it with typical paper scissors. 

Just a suggestion...

CT

Great tip!  Thanks Claude!  I'll try that!

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7 hours ago, CabDriver said:

That's the stuff! I used it for my junior fueler's body and motor plate. I have used it for interior panels, and to make a scoop for my '34. Great stuff! Very versatile.

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On 9/12/2019 at 11:26 AM, Eric Macleod said:

Just to be clear here there are a number of inaccuracies here which lead me to believe this was a pretty cobbled up car.

A '26 Model T Fordor (not a typo) sedan had a gas tank under the front seat while the rest of the Improved Fords (as Ford called them) had the gas tank in the cowl area (basically in the driver's lap) The cowl gas tank holds about 9 1/2 gallons and the under seat version holds 12. Gas tanks were only in the rear part of the car when it was a home made speedster or in the case of the 1910-12 Open Runabouts or Torpedos.

The starter became available in 1919 as optional equipment and they were fairly universal by 1926, though one could still purchase a car "unequipped" with crank start, kerosene lamps (on the cowl and as a tail lamp) as well as non-demountable rims. I built a model of such a car a bit ago.

The horsepower of the 176 CID 4 was 20 hp in 1926. My Fordor has been clocked at 52 MPH with my father behind the wheel, though I have never been that brave in that car, though my Touring will go 55 pretty easily, so long as the top is down.

Mohair interiors were introduced by Ford for use in closed cars beginning in 1928. Prior to that the closed cars used a woven wool material pinstriped in white, green or red and seemed to be at the whim of the supplier, not the color of the car.

Sorry, I don't mean to tear your post up, nor do I doubt the car may have been as you describe, but I want to be accurate about how Fords really look and were equipped instead of perpetuating inaccuracies.

Attached is a photo of two of my Fords, my '26 Touring in the foreground and my '13 Touring in the background. The '26 was the 2006 winner of the Stynowski award, which is given to the best restored Ford Model T in the country.

All the best.

Eric

26_and_13_Ts.jpg

Well the one my boss had was a two door, so that might be part of the issues with the fuel tank being in the trunk. The fenders hood and cowl look like the one on the bosses along with the running board design. His had wood spoke wheels with the metal rims and lugs to remove them from the wood spokes. Wheels like the one in the back, but it had long chrome bearing caps. Your lights are smaller and the rad cap looks the same. The windshield looks a little more laid back than I remember his being, but that may be because it was a two dr. It did have the split glass and it had a crank on the inside for manual window wipers too. Yours looks like it sits a little higher off the ground than his did too. I did not spell mohair wrong, and it might not have been mohair, but that's what I thought it was. IT did not have any stripes or piping or anything on it like that. I don't recall it having any rear lights on it either. I'm only going on what I was told about it and what I saw when I got to work on it. IT was a nice machine for that age and that fact that it would fire right up and run was amazing in itself.  I think I left in 92 and never got a pic of it or the Mustang vert that sat beside it either. That was sad, I should have got pics of them.

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