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Notching tubing/round rod

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No, don't delete!!!!.... I'd like to know how it's done.... So, how's about it guys?????..... ūüėÄ

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I've done it by drilling a hole in the rod (smaller diameter bit than the rod) then gradually increasing the size of the hole with bigger drills, until you get one the same diameter as the rod.  It takes a little planning to figure out where to drill the hole to start with, but then again it's probably no tougher than cutting the rod and then trying to file a notch with small round files.

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Use a round file the same size of the tubing you are using. 

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3 hours ago, Mark said:

I've done it by drilling a hole in the rod (smaller diameter bit than the rod) then gradually increasing the size of the hole with bigger drills, until you get one the same diameter as the rod.  It takes a little planning to figure out where to drill the hole to start with, but then again it's probably no tougher than cutting the rod and then trying to file a notch with small round files.

I like this idea, new to me

 

1 hour ago, Rider said:

Use a round file the same size of the tubing you are using. 

Yep, this works.  I've been using a needle point round file -

I usually cut the rod/tubing at the angle of the joint.  Then make a small grove with a triangular file to guide the round file - then file to shape with a round file

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5 hours ago, Muncie said:

I usually cut the rod/tubing at the angle of the joint.  Then make a small grove with a triangular file to guide the round file - then file to shape with a round file

That's exactly how I do brass tube. It works pretty effectively. One of these days, I am going to figure out a way to create  a simple tubing notcher. Commercial  units appear to use hole saws. I've been pondering this for quite a few years, now, I just haven't figured it all out, yet.

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I have not done this, but the last method posted seems like a good one. If you don't have a round file the proper size, you could pinch a piece of sandpaper around a drill bit of the appropriate size for the final finish.  I have a cheap set of drill bits that have all the fractional, letter and number sizes that would be handy for this sort of task.

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11 hours ago, Muncie said:

...I've been using a needle point round file -

I usually cut the rod/tubing at the angle of the joint.  Then make a small grove with a triangular file to guide the round file - then file to shape with a round file

Exactly.

It seems a little tricky at first, but I've found that, like a lot of things, after you build a few cages or axles, it gets to be second-nature.

One thing is critical though (if you want symmetrical parts, anyway) and that's careful measuring and thinking-through how much length you'll lose when you file your notch or fishmouth. You may occasionally get it wrong and cut a piece too short.

Stuff happens, no matter how careful or experienced you are.

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1 minute ago, Ace-Garageguy said:

Exactly.

It seems a little tricky at first, but I've found that, like a lot of things, after you build a few cages or axles, it gets to be second-nature.

One thing is critical though (if you want symmetrical parts, anyway) and that's careful measuring and thinking-through how much length you'll lose when you file your notch or fishmouth. You may occasionally get it wrong and cut a piece too short.

Stuff happens, no matter how careful or experienced you are.

ūüĎć

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Been following this same technique with angle cut and round file. Never thought to use a triangular file to set the position for the round one, perfect hint!  That will save a lot of aggravation and plastic rod. I usually use a set of dividers to measure the length on the rods and to match them up. The most adventurous construction I've undertaken was the cage for my K5 Aussieball entry.

Cheers Misha

 

IMG_0436.JPG

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3 hours ago, Misha said:

Been following this same technique with angle cut and round file...

It would appear as though you have a solid handle on the technique, sir.  :D

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