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Biggest pet peeves on builds.

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5 hours ago, Snake45 said:

The Perfect is the enemy of Good Enough, and if you're having FUN, you're doing it right. Model on, everyone! B)

Thank you for posting that.  My unsuccessful  pursuit to improve and gain perfection has demoralized me.  I need to back off and enjoy the fun of building again.

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As Factory Stock fan,  overall appearance is important to me. Stance and track widht for example. There is no need to superdetail if basic dimensions are off.

For some reason many muscle car kits suffer totally wrong tire location compared to real one. Hi-riding Monogram Muscle and over fender protruding front tires on AMT 67 Mustang and 66 Fairlane to name few. Correcting track and suspension height and locating tire correctly to wheel well makes wonders to many kits.

 I also prefer curbside models with nice panel gaps over ill fitting opening features. Of course there is also expertly build  super fine models with operable  doors and trunk  with perfect gaps. But if I have to choose between opening doors with bad fit and doors closed but perfect gaps and straight bodywork, then...

Edited by fender6575

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I agree - for me the joy of a model is in how well it captures the spirit of the original. Nothing is finer than a Gerald Wingrove level of perfection in miniature but my amateur 69 'Vette, '69 Charger in French blue, my Spit 24 and the pair of old Frog Starfighters hit the spot.

Stance and function are key. 

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On 1/17/2020 at 11:50 AM, Snake45 said:

Been there, done that, got the T-shirts--in EVERY available color! :lol: I don't even know how many half-built model car (and airplane) projects I have back in their boxes because something wasn't going perfectly in the build. Sometimes this was my own fault, sometimes it was an accuracy issue that I didn't notice until I was way into the thing. The number is in the dozens--maybe the hundreds. 

I'm still that way on many of my own original new builds. But I've also learned to lower my standards in my old age, especially on glue bomb "rescues," where, as I've often said, the goal is to get somebody else's crock to look like something I might have built around 1968. If I can get it to look as good as stuff I built in 1969, I'm ecstatic! In the last couple years, I've dug a couple of my old projects off the Shelf of Doom and applied this standard to them for Bring Out Your Dead Completion projects, and I have to tell you, this is a lot of FUN!

Ah, the good old days, when modeling was FUN, not an obsession. The Perfect is the enemy of Good Enough, and if you're having FUN, you're doing it right. Model on, everyone! B)

The older we get, the smarter we get!  I've backed way off the pursuit of perfection myself.  I still do the best I can, but I'm no longer concerned about it if something just isn't right. People have noticed I get a lot more done these days, and that I have completed a bunch of my old projects that were stalled because something wasn't perfect.  Yea, I'm still proud of my models and show them to my friends. But life is short!

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My pet peeve is when I see a builder state that he bought the magic doohickey part from "Joe". Who is "joe"? Please give a full name, a website, or some other way for us outsiders to track down "Joe"

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21 minutes ago, heyjohnxx said:

My pet peeve is when I see a builder state that he bought the magic doohickey part from "Joe". Who is "joe"? Please give a full name, a website, or some other way for us outsiders to track down "Joe"

Many builders use a lot of aftermarket parts, often many of them on one particular build.

They're not going to give a list of names, websites, etc for every part they used.

 

The solution is a simple one.

Just ask. ;)

 

 

 

Steve

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21 minutes ago, StevenGuthmiller said:

They're not going to give a list of names, websites, etc for every part they used.

I'd rather see that than incessant habit of quoting an entire post (usually multiple times within a thread), complete with every last photo included, just to comment with, "Nice job!" or to ask what brand of flat black paint was used for the battery.

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4 minutes ago, SfanGoch said:

I'd rather see that than incessant habit of quoting an entire post (usually multiple times within a thread), complete with every last photo included, just to comment with, "Nice job!" or to ask what brand of flat black paint was used for the battery.

I'll agree with that!

It's not difficult to remove 10 photos from a reply rather than re-posting them all over again!

 

 

 

Steve

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7 minutes ago, SfanGoch said:

I'd rather see that than incessant habit of quoting an entire post (usually multiple times within a thread), complete with every last photo included, just to comment with, "Nice job!" or to ask what brand of flat black paint was used for the battery.

Preach It, Brother! Can I get a AY-men from the choir? B)

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On 1/16/2020 at 11:18 PM, Oldcarfan27 said:

Sometimes, I feel the same way!

Building can be such hard work. ?

But at least he looks comfortable. 

The cat is actually a she. I’d chase her off of there, but she has intestinal leukemia. It’s well controlled with meds, but I just don’t have the heart. 

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Haven't gone through this entire thread to see if anyone has mentioned it, but nothing breaks my immersion looking at a model more than seeing the rims stick out of the tires too far. Some detail jobs are so good until I get to the wheels and see that the rims aren't fitted wheel to the tires and it quite literally, deflates, the build so to speak lol. Super small detail but I can't ignore it

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33 minutes ago, carchub said:

Haven't gone through this entire thread to see if anyone has mentioned it, but nothing breaks my immersion looking at a model more than seeing the rims stick out of the tires too far. Some detail jobs are so good until I get to the wheels and see that the rims aren't fitted wheel to the tires and it quite literally, deflates, the build so to speak lol. Super small detail but I can't ignore it

I agree 100% What also bugs me is the inevitable small amounts of chrome flash that exists on most chrome wheel rims (at the mold parting line) and aren't sanded off or dealt with in some manner. I also cringe when I see badly applied chrome BMF; no foil is better than bad foil, at least as I see things. (I tend to avoid models that require a lot, as I really suck at it, whereas someone like Steve G has apparently totally mastered it.) Monster truck tire treads on street car tires also annoy me, and are present in so many kits, it seems. Glossy tire treads are another annoyance.

My own issues with my models are inconsistencies with "tooling upgrades". The AMT '32 Ford Victoria pops to mind; modern fancy new engine coupled with driveshaft, rear end and suspension system originally designed for a 90 year old car. As an aircraft and armor modeler, I guess I'm just spoiled by choice, as new kits flow like a river, whereas with what I see as the more desirable car models, I'm generally stuck with 60 year old kits that most certainly reflect their antiquity.

Edited by Roadrunner

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Just finished reading the entire thread (waiting on Step 437 to cure before taking on Step 438.  Scratch-building a structure in 1:64 using near-scale 2x4's is time consuming...) and laughed out loud several times.  Great to see that a little humor is allowed.  I've been on too many sites that were so straight-laced it made my teeth hurt.

One of my personal mantras is "If you want to get better at something, hang out with people that ARE better at it."  This is that kind of place.

I'm in no danger of ever achieving Perfection, but my standard of Good Enough goes up a little with every build.  

Regarding pictures...I regret posting the picture of the milk hauler in the truck section.  It REALLY pointed up the errors and how bad the silver metallic paint looks.  Should have waited until I could find something to better simulate polished aluminum.  Now I'm going to have to take it apart and start over...

 

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On 2/13/2020 at 6:30 PM, Dave Ambrose said:

The cat is actually a she. I’d chase her off of there, but she has intestinal leukemia. It’s well controlled with meds, but I just don’t have the heart. 

Mine is healthy but she likes to plunder so I get her attention on something else instead of getting on to her. 

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Don't know if this was already mentioned, but my particular sore thumb is hoods that don't sit flush with the fenders. I've seen plenty of builds with really nice paint and clean assembly, but the front edge of the closed hood is sitting proud of the fenders. And once I've seen it, I can't un-see it!

It's definitely something I'll be paying attention to once I finally return to building, which should bee soon.

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Not really a build peeve, but a kit peeve. Why can't manufacturers mold in semi proper engine mounts? Granted this is an older kit, but the 409 engine in the AMT kit I am working on has a rectangular peg on the bottom of the oil pan for a front engine mount.:angry: It makes it difficult to build a stand to work on it and display it!

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On 1/16/2020 at 5:28 PM, Monty said:

I get that there was no internet back in '82, but there were a number of Ford & Mustang magazines with color pictures.  I'm not sure who built this box art turd, but he negatively influenced countless lazy modelers with that "goldfish" headlight treatment.  

 

Yes, the way the light hits that part of the grille can make it look lighter, but it's not silver, and definitely not chrome, yet even today, with every conceivable means of accurate research at our fingertips, we still get these builds with the goldfish look.  

 

Thanks for pointing this out. If I ever get to my '70 Mustangs, I will try to remember this.

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On 1/17/2020 at 6:41 AM, Daddyfink said:

Double whammy! Over sized plug wires in an Angry Spider stance!! Because gravity doesn't exist on some benches! 

Been there failed that. I promise to try to do better.

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On 1/17/2020 at 8:10 AM, Oldcarfan27 said:

Thought of another peeve of mine, but it probably doesn't bother other people, because I see it on real cars too.

Factory original engine compartments are not all glossy paint!

Look under the hood of original, unrestored factory built cars. Very little, to no glossy paint - most of it is flat, eggshell, satin or semi-gloss finish. In a scale model the gloss finish detracts, and makes the compartment too reflective - resulting in an out of scale look.

In 1:1 size, it just looks custom or like somebody sprayed Armor All on everything!

Oh, and OEM used minimal chrome (if at all) under the hood. And they NEVER installed chrome alternators, carburetors, fuel pumps, brake boosters or headers from the factory either!

But it probably only bothers me, because I see it a LOT!

Been there failed that too. I will try to do better.

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On 1/18/2020 at 7:24 AM, fender6575 said:

As Factory Stock fan,  overall appearance is important to me. Stance and track width for example. There is no need to super detail if basic dimensions are off.

For some reason many muscle car kits suffer totally wrong tire location compared to real one. Hi-riding Monogram Muscle and over fender protruding front tires on AMT 67 Mustang and 66 Fairlane to name few. Correcting track and suspension height and locating tire correctly to wheel well makes wonders to many kits.

 I also prefer curbside models with nice panel gaps over ill fitting opening features. Of course there is also expertly build  super fine models with operable  doors and trunk  with perfect gaps. But if I have to choose between opening doors with bad fit and doors closed but perfect gaps and straight bodywork, then...

I am in total agreement with your STANCE IS EVERYTHING!!!!!!! I build models not play toys. I have no need for them to roll on the factory axles. I like maximum appropriate Day Two wheel and tire packages. No extra negative camber allowed. It usually take me a minimum of 4 days to glue the wheel and tires EXACTLY where I want them. Once in a while the rear metal axle works but not that often.

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On 2/16/2020 at 10:49 AM, carchub said:

Haven't gone through this entire thread to see if anyone has mentioned it, but nothing breaks my immersion looking at a model more than seeing the rims stick out of the tires too far. Some detail jobs are so good until I get to the wheels and see that the rims aren't fitted wheel to the tires and it quite literally, deflates, the build so to speak lol. Super small detail but I can't ignore it

Agreed. Tire tread WIDER than the rim looks better than rim WIDER than the tire tread. (Unless it is a 30's to 50's era car built stock)

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On 2/16/2020 at 12:53 PM, PHPaul said:

One of my personal mantras is "If you want to get better at something, hang out with people that ARE better at it."  This is that kind of place.

I'm in no danger of ever achieving Perfection, but my standard of Good Enough goes up a little with every build.  

 

I like your philosophy. I think I will adopt it too.

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On 12/3/2019 at 8:23 PM, Snake45 said:

And, conversely, roadster pickups and other clearly ROD early trucks that get moved here down to the Truck section (which I never look at). :angry:

I can't say that I like that idea a lot. I have '29 and '53 pickups still to do. They're going to eventually end up in the truck section? That just became my new pet peeve.

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On 12/4/2019 at 1:25 AM, StevenGuthmiller said:

My biggest pet peeve doesn't bother a lot of people, but it's metallic paint that has metallic in it that is way too big, or far too heavy for 1/25th scale.

In my opinion, the little things like mold lines in radiators or tires might not be immediately evident on a model, but there's no hiding "the bass boat syndrome".

It's an instant turn off for me.

Steve 

Guilty as charged. The Testors cans are perhaps the worst; unfortunately I have quite a few of them, mostly new too.

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