Jump to content
Model Cars Magazine Forum

Recommended Posts

How do you figure scale I would like to know how much is 8 inches 1:1 in 1.25 scale.  Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, larry ray said:

How do you figure scale I would like to know how much is 8 inches 1:1 in 1.25 scale.  Thanks

You mean 1/25 scale. 1/25 of 8" is .32". Just punch 1/25 of any number of inches into Google and get an instant answer. 1/25 of 12" is .48" or a tad shy of 1/2".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

8 (your measurement)  divided by 25 (your scale) = 0.32 inch. The exact fraction is 8/25

To get a close and understandable from a ruler viewpoint fraction 0.32 is a bit less than a third of an inch. My thought is 5/16 should be close.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you can get used to using metric too, it’s super easy - 1 inch in scale is (give or take) 1mm.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why go to Google when you can do this using any basic 4-function calculator?  Or just do it longhand (of you still remember how). This is 1st grade math.

Just take the 1:1 dimension (in inches), divide it by 25 (or whatever scale you need to use), and you get the scale dimension (still in 1:1 inches, which you do need to fabricate the part).  I have couple of those tiny cheap calculators (keychains) from Staples (or Dollar Store) hanging around my workbench, just for this purpose.

8" / 25 = 0.32"  I also own a $20 digital calipers from Harbor Freight, so I can dial 0.320" directly on the calipers to measure out the part I'm making.  Those are couple of (very inexpensive) tools I find indispensable in this hobby.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/8/2019 at 2:13 PM, CabDriver said:

If you can get used to using metric too, it’s super easy - 1 inch in scale is (give or take) 1mm.  

This is what I use. I do all my model math in millimeters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I find the digital 

On 12/8/2019 at 10:23 PM, peteski said:

Why go to Google when you can do this using any basic 4-function calculator?  Or just do it longhand (of you still remember how). This is 1st grade math.

Just take the 1:1 dimension (in inches), divide it by 25 (or whatever scale you need to use), and you get the scale dimension (still in 1:1 inches, which you do need to fabricate the part).  I have couple of those tiny cheap calculators (keychains) from Staples (or Dollar Store) hanging around my workbench, just for this purpose.

8" / 25 = 0.32"  I also own a $20 digital calipers from Harbor Freight, so I can dial 0.320" directly on the calipers to measure out the part I'm making.  Those are couple of (very inexpensive) tools I find indispensable in this hobby.

The digital caliper has saved my sanity in both the hobby and my profession more times than I can count!

It is most assuredly a must have tool for ANY fabricator/mechanic etc...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

image.png.c22e14791696f70da64b12e1fe899535.png

image.png.b27a9e39ee1ddfcc059b488507b0fb10.png

Why do any math?  Here's a couple  1/25 scale rulers.  Put it up against your model and measure it off accurately in scale!  

Edited by Tom Geiger

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Tom Geiger said:

1/25 scale ruler

Hi Tom

Did you ever check if you had any of those NNL rulers left....I asked you about them Saturday night in Toledo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Khils said:

Hi Tom

Did you ever check if you had any of those NNL rulers left....I asked you about them Saturday night in Toledo.

I remember Kevin!  I just sent you a private message.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I were to try scratch building the scale I'd choose would be 25.4:1 or a simple 1mm=1".  That way a digital caliper in mm mode would simply be read as 1:1 scale inches.  A metric dial caliper would be the same only lacking the ability to switch the measurement to actual inches.

Using 25.4 as a scale might allow the scratch built model to "fit" reasonably well alongside either 1:25 or 1:24 kit models.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...