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Yellow (UGH!) plastic cover-up.

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I am in the process of building the Revell '69 Shelby GT-500 and would like to paint it in the factory color of Silver Jade.  The problem is that the kit is molded in a gad-awful yellow plastic and I am afraid that the yellow will bleed through.  I have had this problem in the past with red plastic.  My thought process is to prime the body with Tamiya Gray Primer first and then follow that with Tamiya White Primer and then the color coats.  Also, I would like to keep the number of primer/paint coats to a minimum due to the soft molding of the emblems. 

I would appreciate any advise that anyone could provide on how to proceed with this project.

Thank you.   

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I can only tell you what doesn't work lol

Duplicolor grey sealer primer will NOT stop bleed thru

Duplicolor Silver will NOT work

Alclad white primer sealer will NOT work

I've tried just about every combination of base coats to hide red or yellow paints,..all will seem fine, and then I shoot a clear coat and OHHH ya there it is again....

I found it easier to pick a different colour to paint my model hehehe

There are other topics on the forum regarding this,..but the answer is hidden amongst unproven wive's tales and a serious lack of proof pictures.

Good luck in your search

Cheers

 

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I've brought this up on other threads, but this is my go to solution when it comes to sealing plastic against hot paints, as well as stopping "bleed through".

PC284504-vi.jpg

First, you'll need an airbrush and then you'd need to stir up the contents thoroughly. I'll spray a very light coat of primer first on the plastic, then it's followed up by several coats of the BIN. Lights coats are important as you don't want to bury any script detail and whatnot. I'll then follow this up with another coat or two of primer followed by my color coats.

Never had an issue with crazing which is akin to bleed through as that's the color of the plastic showing through on primer which has not tight enough pigment in the paint to prevent that.

Hope this helps!

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At one time, my solution was to use Plasti Kote primer. Never had a problem with bleed through. But, now that it's no more (DO NOT buy the Plasti Kote by Valspar! It's not the same and is a waste of money!), I don't have a tried and true method.

I recently had a bleed through issue which was my first and it was over Lindberg's yellow plastic. I think it had some kind of clear on it as it was really shiney. Anyway. I primed with Tamiya gray. Painted with Tamiya Blue. Shot a coat of clear and everything was fine. I allowed it to dry for a day. When I shot the second coat of clear on the bed and grille, bleed through! So, I allowed that to dry, shot one coat of paint, one coat of clear and had no bleed through. All I could do with it from that point was lightly polish it. 

I think you would be OK with the Tamiya Silver paint as long as you keep it to a bare minimum. I don't see a need for the white primer. Tamiya white primer barely will cover white styrene. Since you're painting it silver, I would go with the straight gray primer. I would definitely do a test on a piece you aren't using or a small piece before committing to the body.

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I wouldn't worry about it. I don't think the yellow will "bleed through" (that's not what's actually happening) your Silver Jade. Prime it with whatever gray you like, or black, and shoot away. 

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A coat of Testors lacquer primer, followed by a few light coats of Duplicolor primer/sealer has always worked for me.

People frequently bring up the issue of "bleed through" but I personally have never seen it using my current paint regimen.

 

image.jpeg.230a7e78af68bf983ef92aa708597f47.jpeg

image.jpeg.93a41d560f463b35415c5eb0813ac3bd.jpeg

 

 

 

 

 

Steve

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3 hours ago, MrObsessive said:

Hope this helps!

Thanks Bill, I actually have some of that in the shop...phhtt use it all the time on knot holes before paint..never thought to use it on plastic..

I will try it and take pics... Cheers

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2 hours ago, StevenGuthmiller said:

image.jpeg.230a7e78af68bf983ef92aa708597f47.jpeg

 

 

 

That is a very pale yellow, old plastic Steve..I was speaking more on the newer, deep yellow, orange, and red kits, but I will try your clear over primer under topcoat idea

yellow.jpg.9900313a23228fcafe897ee90eaea701.jpg

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On colored plastic bodies I use Tamiya Silver Leaf, followed by primer, then my color coats, and finally my clear coats and have never had a problem of "bleed through."

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1 hour ago, Belugawrx said:

That is a very pale yellow, old plastic Steve..I was speaking more on the newer, deep yellow, orange, and red kits, but I will try your clear over primer under topcoat idea

Must be someone else's technique.

I just use straight primer,  No clear. ;)

 

 

 

Steve

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I don't paint because I have not learned enough to do it with confidence. I pay attention to most of the comments made in the many threads about the subject and see many opinions.  This thread has me a little confused in that I don't understand what the term "bleed through" is describing here.  Is it actually a bleeding of color pigment (via migration) through the paint or is it just a coverage problem where the paints don't have enough opacity due to layer thickness or paint pigment density?

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6 hours ago, Flat32 said:

I don't paint because I have not learned enough to do it with confidence. I pay attention to most of the comments made in the many threads about the subject and see many opinions.  This thread has me a little confused in that I don't understand what the term "bleed through" is describing here.  Is it actually a bleeding of color pigment (via migration) through the paint or is it just a coverage problem where the paints don't have enough opacity due to layer thickness or paint pigment density?

Raymond, your latter thought is more likely the culprit. A lot of primers may have an opacity problem where the pigments are not "tight" enough to get better coverage. The reason I mentioned the BIN Zinnser is twofold: Bodywork and plastic compatibility.

I may end up doing at times a bit of bodywork to fix imperfections in the shape of a particular model, and then there's the issue of today's plastics which can be wildly inconsistent as far as how they'll take a particular brand of paint. Putting on that barrier coat helps a ton in giving me that extra bit of insurance against surprises as I've had one too many times in the past, paint craze due to "weak" plastic, and using certain fillers which don't always play nice with certain types of paint.

This is what has worked for me for years now and I have pics on hand where I've used the BIN over plastic (primer first) and have gotten good results.

As they say.........."Your mileage may vary". ;)

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8 hours ago, Flat32 said:

I don't paint because I have not learned enough to do it with confidence. I pay attention to most of the comments made in the many threads about the subject and see many opinions.  This thread has me a little confused in that I don't understand what the term "bleed through" is describing here.  Is it actually a bleeding of color pigment (via migration) through the paint or is it just a coverage problem where the paints don't have enough opacity due to layer thickness or paint pigment density?

This is an example of bleed through.  If you look just below the word "Service" on the cab you can see a slight color shift in the white, then if you look really closely just under the sleeper window you can see a color shift in the gold.  This cab was molded in red, that strip around the cab is white styrene.  I used every tip that has been mentioned, except for the Zinsser primer, and I still got bleed through.  However the Mustang was molded in yellow and I had no problems with bleed-through and it was painted the same way using the same colors.  I really think bleed through is some form of demonic force that enjoys playing tricks on unsuspecting modelers.

'Stang & Hauler 085.jpg

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14 hours ago, StevenGuthmiller said:

A coat of Testors lacquer primer, followed by a few light coats of Duplicolor primer/sealer has always worked for me.

People frequently bring up the issue of "bleed through" but I personally have never seen it using my current paint regimen.

 

image.jpeg.230a7e78af68bf983ef92aa708597f47.jpeg

image.jpeg.93a41d560f463b35415c5eb0813ac3bd.jpeg

 

 

 

 

 

Steve

Love your Parklane convertible. The real cars were rocket inspired works of art IMO.

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In order to find out what suggestion works for you why not try them on sections of the sprue from the kit with the materials you have at hand before investing in new and many times expensive paint products.

Edited by misterNNL
kindle suggested spelling was incorect.

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Who made the kit and how old is it??  Do you have any of the red sprue to experiment with?  Do you recall exactly what paints and thinners you used??  You have a very good example and if you can answer these questions you could be instrumental in pinning down the real cause and ultimate cure. My interest is related to the fact I've got a 3D printing resin that is loaded with a red pigment and I don't like using heavy coats of detail hiding primer paint.

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I've been using BIN for over 25 years with good results.

A couple things to remember though,,

It will not stick to bare glossy plastic. You could lightly sand but you need to hit every exposed inch of what your painting. Or simply a light coat of any primer or flat paint makes a good base for it to stick to. 

 

Thin it down well and airbrush it.

I use just cheap rubbing alcohol to thin it and for cleanup. Apply in multiple, thin coats. It flashes over quickly and you can apply another coat in 10 or 15 minutes.  Keep applying coats until it's solid white and you can't see through it at all.

Allow it to dry overnight.

After drying overnight you can wet sand it with 1000 grit or finer. 

Buy it in the spraycan,.

The quart can Bill shows is cheaper than the spray but you'll never use that much before it starts to rust inside the lid of the can.  I made this mistake. Used about an inch of product out of the can before it was unusable with rust. Took a couple years to get that way but still a waste of 90% of the can.  Not a good idea to spray strait from the can though,  too thick and chunky for model use and comes out like it's coming out of a fire hose.

Besides blocking bleed through and hot paints I've also used it as a "high fill" primer to smooth out damage caused by hot paints. A few coats, wet sanded between coats and lacquer damaged plastic is ready for paint again.

steve's pics 073

Edited by Can-Con

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Steve, I've used mine right out of the can (NOT the aerosol), but I've used my old Badger Crescendo with the heaviest tip to put it on. I didn't have any trouble with it going on too thick. Here's a pic of that '74 Corvette that I restored where I didn't want any surprises with some of the bodywork/corrections I had to do.

P1016444-vi.jpg
P1016443-vi.jpg

Yes, it's a very good idea to put on a light coat of primer before the BIN as it will adhere much better. I did let this sit for a day and then a couple coats of grey primer were put on before the color coats. Just some very light sanding I needed to do. Perhaps this is due to the Crescendo atomizing the BIN a bit better than if I were to spray it directly out of the can, which for me is a no-go.

As far as longevity of the BIN..............that is one downside of getting the larger can----it can go bad after a couple years. I didn't have any trouble with rust, rather it just got waaaay too thick to use to the point that not even 91% alcohol would have any effect. I never liked the spray cans though, but in the future if I have to go that route, I'm definitely decanting it into an airbrush jar and then spray away. ;)

Edited by MrObsessive

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Try Badger Stynelrez black primer.  Nothin gonna show thru that stuff.. and it goes down super smooth so it won't hide the details.  

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49 minutes ago, El Roberto said:

Try Badger Stynelrez black primer.  Nothin gonna show thru that stuff.. and it goes down super smooth so it won't hide the details.  

I'll second that, then if they really want a light base coat just go over it with whatever you like before top coating.

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There are plenty of great suggestions posted here (I use the Tamiya Silver as barrier coat myself), but if you want to be certain that there won't be a colour shift, you may want to look into picking up a reissue of the GT500 that is not molded in yellow plastic. There have been a couple of reissues molded in white plastic, and the emblems on the kit are fine enough to warrant the fewest coats of paint/primer you can get away with using.

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4 hours ago, Dave G. said:

I'll second that, then if they really want a light base coat just go over it with whatever you like before top coating.

I bought several colors of these at a show recently, specifically to use as barriers,  but have yet to tryt hem. What are you guys using the clean the brush when done?

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13 hours ago, Modelbuilder Mark said:

I bought several colors of these at a show recently, specifically to use as barriers,  but have yet to tryt hem. What are you guys using the clean the brush when done?

I flush with warm water at my kitchen sink and follow up with alcohol. It dries quickly, don't leave your airbrush sitting around with Stynylrez residue in it thinking you will clean it later. If you clean it right away it's a non issue. Course I spray in my kitchen to begin with so I just move over to the sink with the brush still hooked to the compressor. I'm considering moving my booth to the basement and if so will have to reconsider how I clean then.

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