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64 Dodge D100 Pickup Pro Street

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Been a while since I've peeked in on this build to see what was happening with it and when I finally do I see that I am NOT disappointed with the progress. Keep up the good work Francis. 

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9 hours ago, mustang1989 said:

Been a while since I've peeked in on this build to see what was happening with it and when I finally do I see that I am NOT disappointed with the progress. Keep up the good work Francis. 

Thanks Joe!  Not much progress lately but I still have some occasional bench time but expect to return to my normal pace in the cooler months to come.  Always happy to have your visit buddy!

Take care, Francis

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Steady and wonderful progress Francis.  Thanks again for sharing your methods.....we can all learn from others and I've learned from you as well.   Cheers, Tim

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20 hours ago, Codi said:

Steady and wonderful progress Francis.  Thanks again for sharing your methods.....we can all learn from others and I've learned from you as well.   Cheers, Tim

Thanks Tim!  You are very well placed to understand the long process of this kind of build and only patience and dedication can overcome it.  Like you, I move forward one piece at a time and your prowess has helped me improve the making of my own parts.  Take care, Francis

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Hello everyone,

I was able to find some time lately to progress on the pickup so I decided to make the 4-link for the rear axle.  I wanted something that fits precisely, so I made the eyelets out of brass and solder them to brass rods that slide inside a tubing so I could adjust the length.  I made the locknuts from an aluminum rod but they are not functional (not threaded) but just to simulate the adjusting nuts like the real ones.  It's not a big step forward, but it's another part of the puzzle... I hope to present more to you in the coming weeks!

Take care, Francis

Locknuts machined from a 0.125" aluminum rod233_4-LinkArms_Progress_1.JPG.8f88f085a5e51557645204d74c37ef22.JPG

4-link made from various brass rod and tubbing.  Eyelets are welded on brass rods.234_4-LinkArms_Final_1.JPG.e5aad29b50b7261b89be384641e59a51.JPG

They fit well between the 4-link brackets, I will use some aluminum bolts and nuts at the final stage.234b_4-LinkArms_Final_2.JPG.38a195510d1cd8ebb13b9d48a079989a.JPG

Different view234c_4-LinkArms_Final_3.JPG.c2fc1749203e5a706816c797d760e811.JPG

Different angle of view234d_4-LinkArms_Final_4.JPG.fd4d2d2d1a0a7e4d7ee0c808b37ff888.JPG

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Excellent work, Francis! Do I understand, correctly that the eyes/rod ends are brass rod that you drilled? I often use my lathe as a giant hand drill for making fittings from Plastruct hex rod. Glad you found some time to "hit the bench"! Always enjoy seeing your fine work, sir!

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22 hours ago, Straightliner59 said:

Excellent work, Francis! Do I understand, correctly that the eyes/rod ends are brass rod that you drilled? I often use my lathe as a giant hand drill for making fittings from Plastruct hex rod. Glad you found some time to "hit the bench"! Always enjoy seeing your fine work, sir!

Yep!  It would have been easier to slip a small brass tube into a larger one but I wanted to drill a perpendicular hole on the side of the rod ends to insert the brass rod into it before soldering it.  With that technique, I had more meat to nest the brass rod prior to weld and I was also able to drill the eye rod with the exact size I wanted.  Hope it make sense... !?  Maybe too much work for mundane parts... 🤔

Thank you for your kind comments by the way, I appreciate your constant support my friend!   Take care, Francis

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4 hours ago, AmericanMuscleFan said:

Maybe too much work for mundane parts... 🤔

Never! Thanks for sharing that bit of knowledge!

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Just wonderful! 

Francis, I agree with your method.  Your rendition is better than mine.  Much cleaner, as I have to use several slide tubes to correct size differences.

Your way is better, and also your skills and equipment.  What a thrill to view!  Thanks for showing other ways, I do love this.

Mike..

 

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16 hours ago, Straightliner59 said:

Never! Thanks for sharing that bit of knowledge!

Thanks for the feeling Daniel, you make me feel better about my obsession with this kind of detail...! 😁

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16 hours ago, Mike Williams said:

Just wonderful! 

Francis, I agree with your method.  Your rendition is better than mine.  Much cleaner, as I have to use several slide tubes to correct size differences.

Your way is better, and also your skills and equipment.  What a thrill to view!  Thanks for showing other ways, I do love this.

Mike..

Thanks for the kind comments Mike!

The "sliding tube" technique is a great way to make these parts (I made a lot of parts this way) but I have to admit that my equipment is an asset in this situation!

You are an expert when it comes to soldering brass so your positive feedback on my technique is highly appreciated.

I must admit that I take more and more pleasure in working with brass even if I am only a novice in this field!

Take care, Francis

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BACK IN BLACK he is!!! Man you're givin' this one the ol' one-two Francis!  spacer.png

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7 hours ago, mustang1989 said:

BACK IN BLACK he is!!! Man you're givin' this one the ol' one-two Francis!  spacer.png

Thanks Joe!  Hope to bring you something sexier with my next updates my friend!  :rolleyes:

Take care, Francis

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Hi Francis!

Great parts. Since it is not a triangulated 4-bar system, do you plan on using an Panhard rod, or a Watts linkage so stabilize the rear end? Just curious...

Let me guess: a Watts would be more complicated. take more time... Do I see a pattern here? (Just kidding!)

CT

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12 hours ago, Claude Thibodeau said:

Hi Francis!

Great parts. Since it is not a triangulated 4-bar system, do you plan on using an Panhard rod, or a Watts linkage so stabilize the rear end? Just curious...

Let me guess: a Watts would be more complicated. take more time... Do I see a pattern here? (Just kidding!)

CT

Hi Claude!

I have no plans to do any of these devices...

I plan to make supports for the wheelie bars (between the 4-link brackets and the housing) so space will be non-existent once the coil-over shocks will also be in place.

The only other mechanical part that I will try to add is a Wishbone kit so with all the plumbing and the last details in place, the back of this truck will look like a mini Eiffel tower!

Note that I want to finish this thing before I receive my first pension check and no longer recognize you in person my friend... 🤨

Take care, Francis

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40 minutes ago, AmericanMuscleFan said:

Hi Claude!

I have no plans to do any of these devices...

I plan to make supports for the wheelie bars (between the 4-link brackets and the housing) so space will be non-existent once the coil-over shocks will also be in place.

The only other mechanical part that I will try to add is a Wishbone kit so with all the plumbing and the last details in place, the back of this truck will look like a mini Eiffel tower!

Note that I want to finish this thing before I receive my first pension check and no longer recognize you in person my friend... 🤨

Take care, Francis

Hi Francis!

As I'm certain you know, both systems are usually located directly over the housing, in a transverse manner. so I don't think it would actually interfere with your existing parts.

I'm mentionning that only because with the formidable amount of realism that you impart into this built, it would be a downer if an observer, more like a smartass such as me, would argue that your 4 bar system lacks a critical component...

That being said, I can't blame you to keep it as simple as possible. That was the rightful gospel preached by master machinists such as the late John Buttera, just to name one.

And I would'nt dare argue with him...

Hope to see you before you turn 65, kid!

CT

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On 9/9/2020 at 12:19 PM, Claude Thibodeau said:

Hi Francis!

As I'm certain you know, both systems are usually located directly over the housing, in a transverse manner. so I don't think it would actually interfere with your existing parts.

I'm mentionning that only because with the formidable amount of realism that you impart into this built, it would be a downer if an observer, more like a smartass such as me, would argue that your 4 bar system lacks a critical component...

That being said, I can't blame you to keep it as simple as possible. That was the rightful gospel preached by master machinists such as the late John Buttera, just to name one.

And I would'nt dare argue with him...

Hope to see you before you turn 65, kid!

CT

Thanks again for your kind comments and expertise my friend!

As you can see, I have not finished with this truck yet and I am still machining all the parts and other mechanical components.  I will see how I can integrate this stabilization feature when I start the final assembly and that I will have a better idea of the space available between the differential and the chassis.

With this type of construction some parts are well hidden behind other components and sometimes I am placed in the situation where I have to wonder if it is worth investing all that extra time to make all the details 100% accurate.

I sometimes wonder if I haven't taken this project a little too far... we'll see... for the moment, I consider it a bit like a laboratory if I can put it that way...

I consider myself very lucky to have the support and the good advice of passionate and experienced people (like you among others) to push me to keep improving!

Seeing you before I turn 65 should be possible by the way... 😊

Take care, Francis

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3 hours ago, AmericanMuscleFan said:

Thanks again for your kind comments and expertise my friend!

As you can see, I have not finished with this truck yet and I am still machining all the parts and other mechanical components.  I will see how I can integrate this stabilization feature when I start the final assembly and that I will have a better idea of the space available between the differential and the chassis.

With this type of construction some parts are well hidden behind other components and sometimes I am placed in the situation where I have to wonder if it is worth investing all that extra time to make all the details 100% accurate.

I sometimes wonder if I haven't taken this project a little too far... we'll see... for the moment, I consider it a bit like a laboratory if I can put it that way...

I consider myself very lucky to have the support and the good advice of passionate and experienced people (like you among others) to push me to keep improving!

Seeing you before I turn 65 should be possible by the way... 😊

Take care, Francis

Hi Francis!

How dare you doubt the wisdom of going as far as you've done, detail wise? As you a proved countless times, perfection takes time. I think you've got a huge followers base that claims for more, all the time. And you sure deliver, day after day. 

I was looking at your 4 bar set-up, and I think your easiest approach would be to copy what some funny-cars do. They often install a fifth bar, diagonal, between the two lower bars. It is mounted on the same pivot bolt as the lower bars, let's say for this example, INSIDE the pivot bolt on the passenger side lower bar (at the front), and INSIDE the pivot bolt on the driver's side lower bar (at the back). So, it triangulates your bar, and prevents any lateral movement under hard acceleration (which this truck will see a lot, isn't it?), or cornering. 

That would be the less disruptive and/or cumbersome way to nail it, because it would run diagonally between your two lower bars, or upper bars if the driving shaft is in the way when the rear end goes up and down over bumps. 

Just my two cents, for what it is worth... 

CT

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20 hours ago, Claude Thibodeau said:

Hi Francis!

How dare you doubt the wisdom of going as far as you've done, detail wise? As you a proved countless times, perfection takes time. I think you've got a huge followers base that claims for more, all the time. And you sure deliver, day after day. 

I was looking at your 4 bar set-up, and I think your easiest approach would be to copy what some funny-cars do. They often install a fifth bar, diagonal, between the two lower bars. It is mounted on the same pivot bolt as the lower bars, let's say for this example, INSIDE the pivot bolt on the passenger side lower bar (at the front), and INSIDE the pivot bolt on the driver's side lower bar (at the back). So, it triangulates your bar, and prevents any lateral movement under hard acceleration (which this truck will see a lot, isn't it?), or cornering. 

That would be the less disruptive and/or cumbersome way to nail it, because it would run diagonally between your two lower bars, or upper bars if the driving shaft is in the way when the rear end goes up and down over bumps. 

Just my two cents, for what it is worth... 

CT

Hi again Claude!

Thanks buddy, I do appreciate your sentiment about my build!

Your suggested solution to triangulate the rear end is a clever idea and I will take a look at the possibility to make it that way if nothing work as planned.

At the beginning of the build, my very first idea (put on ice meanwhile) was to use a more traditional approach (like the photo attached) and as mentioned I'll see how I could incorporate this functionality later in the build when the final adjustments on the suspension are started.

arb6-L.jpg.8cbe7891c9d1bede9cd0128c99d66fdf.jpg

This part of the build will be very very busy... a lot of attachment points bolts and pins in perspective... I may need some intuitive instruments for the final assembly... 🤫

Thanks again my friend, Francis

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2 hours ago, AmericanMuscleFan said:

Hi again Claude!

Thanks buddy, I do appreciate your sentiment about my build!

Your suggested solution to triangulate the rear end is a clever idea and I will take a look at the possibility to make it that way if nothing work as planned.

At the beginning of the build, my very first idea (put on ice meanwhile) was to use a more traditional approach (like the photo attached) and as mentioned I'll see how I could incorporate this functionality later in the build when the final adjustments on the suspension are started.

arb6-L.jpg.8cbe7891c9d1bede9cd0128c99d66fdf.jpg

This part of the build will be very very busy... a lot of attachment points bolts and pins in perspective... I may need some intuitive instruments for the final assembly... 🤫

Thanks again my friend, Francis

Hi Francis!

Wow, lots of action in this picture: anti-sway bar, 4 bars and a big TRIANGULATED Panhard rod. Quite cumbersome. My idea would achieve the same stability, but with much less mass and weight. And since your Dodge will be a drag truck... might as well save some weight!

Keep on!

CT

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On 9/11/2020 at 7:11 PM, Claude Thibodeau said:

Hi Francis!

Wow, lots of action in this picture: anti-sway bar, 4 bars and a big TRIANGULATED Panhard rod. Quite cumbersome. My idea would achieve the same stability, but with much less mass and weight. And since your Dodge will be a drag truck... might as well save some weight!

Keep on!

CT

Hi Claude,  Sorry for my lack of knowledge about all the exact names and terms for all these suspensions/stabilisation system components... you are really ahead of me in this area with your vast experience in building real things...

Speaking of weight, the mill of a thousand horsepower under the hood should be able to support the few extra pounds... even if that's not the best option when it comes to performance!

I might be tempted to go with the most spectacular but the reality could catch me at the end...

I keep your idea in my boxes as we say in our part of the country and I will see it when it comes time to take action!

Always a pleasure, Francis

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I would like to write at this stage, it was a pleasure to read the comments among two French-speaking members, being translated to our forum language.

We had possibly an opportunity to view some flying sparks, or maybe not.  I do feel it's a blessing to learn another language, and all the intricate features available.  I would not do well as an Ambassador. Luckily, I never had to during travels.

Francis, the shown photo of the triangulation is useless.  The connection to the left and right chassis rails will negate the calculation.  There is too much play with this connection.  

This is not my personal opinion, just from a pro who knows.  I believe this is correct.

Mike..

 

 

Edited by Mike Williams

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On 9/15/2020 at 5:58 PM, Mike Williams said:

I would like to write at this stage, it was a pleasure to read the comments among two French-speaking members, being translated to our forum language.

We had possibly an opportunity to view some flying sparks, or maybe not.  I do feel it's a blessing to learn another language, and all the intricate features available.  I would not do well as an Ambassador. Luckily, I never had to during travels.

Francis, the shown photo of the triangulation is useless.  The connection to the left and right chassis rails will negate the calculation.  There is too much play with this connection.  

This is not my personal opinion, just from a pro who knows.  I believe this is correct.

Mike..

Hello Mike!

Thanks for sharing your appreciation about the exchange between me and Claude, he is a good friend and we have great respect for each other.  We both have chosen to post our comments in the Shakespeare tongue for the sake and respect of our fellow members of the forum.

One of the best aspects of this forum is to be in contact with specialists and very knowledgeable members who can advise us on more technical or mechanical aspects.

This build is the most complex thing I have undertaken so far and I do not plan to do all the parts in an unavoidable logic but for the pleasure of doing things that I have never done before.

I might be tempted to go more with what pleases me the most or the challenges of fabrication and machining than with functionality.

It may also be that the reality catches me and that I must content myself with integrating what space and my limits or my skills will impose on me when the time comes.

I hope the indulgence of my partners if the road I take is not unanimous... it is only a scale model after all...!

Thanks again for your contribution, I really appreciate it!

More updates to come soon.

Take care, Francis

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Hello everyone,

Autumn is slowly settling in and the great cleaning of flower beds and land has already started in our part of the world...

I just had a few hours of bench time over the past few days and decided to make a few small parts with the limited time available so I turned the harmonic balancer and the crank pulley.  The crank damper and the flywheel will be connected together using a brass rod so both will rotate together (if everything works as planned...).  This is just an experiment so it's not a big deal if the parts stay static...🤔

Sorry if I make my parts out of logical order, I'm just trying to use the time I have to keep moving slowly through the project, I have to do all the parts anyway!

I hope to bring you more substantial updates to eat in the coming weeks or months...

Take care, Francis

Aluminum harmonic balancer in the rotary table235_Crank_Damper_Progress.JPG.b310206a8649e7471d010aa9792b872e.JPG

Crank pulley in the lathe chuck, I am machining the belt groove.236_Crank_Pulley_Progress.JPG.1cb0e516fced685ce105b7d0d18747d3.JPG

Both parts together, I will use brass bolts to mount the pulley on the damper.  237_Crank_Pulley_Damper_Final.JPG.be657f2b76cd99ea2b3f63d3da2d40c0.JPG

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Hi Francis,

I just stumbled on this thread for the first time and I'm in total awe. Amazing! Keep up the good work!

-Art

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