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AmericanMuscleFan

64 Dodge D100 Pickup Pro Street

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Awesome scratch building and milling in such small and thin pieces! Great work will be following this one and learn a Ton!

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Jealous of your machining skills, really nice work! My late father was a pro machinist for decades, gave me a mini lathe he built, but I still barely make circular shapes via eyeball engineering. My loss for not learning enough from him.

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Hello All,

Rooster, Keith, TJ, Craig, Anton, Ray: Thank you for the kind comments on my build!

Russel: Don't be intimidated by your lathe, I bought mine probably 12 years ago with zero experience as machining. I started by turning simple parts (mainly pulleys and straight plastic parts) and moved to more complex parts few years later when I was confident enough about my skills. I'ts still today my preffered part of model car building. By the way, thanks for you comments!

With good progress on the body, it was time to move to the basic component of this build including the frame! This is one of the most important part of the build since everything will be connected to that critical part so it must be perfectly straight. The frame is mainly made with styrene strips with 4-link brackets made with 0.010'' aluminum sheets. I saw Tim Hoagland building his notorious (and sadly defunct 😪) Henry J Twin Turbo on a jig (and I'm jalous of his genious) but I don't have the patience (sound crazy...) to build one so I took a lot of precautions to make my frame symetrical by mounting all parts on milling table before glueing the plastics components with Bondene. With the frame completed I will be able to makes the directions and suspensions components (to be seen in future posts).

Cheers, Francis

Back frame rails made with 0.100’’ x 0.156’’ Evergreen styrene strips on the milling table. Both sides are machined and drilled together for a perfect final alinment.41_Frame_Rail_Milling.JPG.e98b90e47ea48d593abe1ffa570d9e3f.JPG

Frame in progress. Back fender tubs in place and bed floor in progress.42_Frame_Rail_Floor.JPG.f5ef483921187bc3900b5d85304c5146.JPG

View of the back section of the frame showing the 4-links brackets made with 0.010’’ aluminum. They are sandwiched between layers of styrene to ensure good support.42b_Frame_4link.JPG.8a61e502e4e8491c704aed28234c938b.JPG

Different view, you can also see the drive shaft safety loop integrated in the frame.42c_Frame_4link_2.JPG.9b774d2445b72b90e40aeb39eb5ebf10.JPG

Bed floor in progress. The hump between the wheels tubs is made by layering a 0.022'' styrene sheet over the back frame section for perfect fit).43_Box_Floor.JPG.07af9251402cc9cb5bd2c2d4df8de637.JPG

Front section of the frame in the milling vise. This part will hold the front suspension tables (wishbone) and the Mustang II style direction (kind of K member).44_Front_Frame_Milling.JPG.b81a5d0539bfcdf9c61b374bb202bf39.JPG

Wrong picture order according to the thread but these are the 4-links brackets seen in previous pictures on the milling table (4 pieces stacked and drilled together for accuracy)45_4link_Milling.JPG.4c4513a578ed2cb75dcf82f95a225df5.JPG

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Great stuff! Very meticulous! 

How many parts do you think you'll end up having?

Edited by Bucky

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Hello Keith and thanks for for you question!

This is a hard question to answer but parts count will add-up quickly (as opposite of the building process) but it will be several hundreds. Some parts include multiple components, structural and for detailling purpose so this will affect the final count. The parts count for the 70 GTX was probably over 400 so I don't imagine that the D100 will be made with a fewer amout of pieces. Drop in regularly and you will see more progress and new pics on the next weeks.

Cheer, Francis

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Really impressive and inspirational building - enjoying this thread!  Keep it coming!

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On 1/18/2020 at 12:44 PM, AmericanMuscleFan said:

....Russell: Don't be intimidated by your lathe, I bought mine probably 12 years ago with zero experience as machining. I started by turning simple parts (mainly pulleys and straight plastic parts) and moved to more complex parts few years later when I was confident enough about my skills. I'ts still today my preffered part of model car building. ....

I'll figure it out one of these days. I mostly cheat by using my motor tool to 'lathe-turn' little things instead, such as replicating a bullet taillight lens from clear red sprue to match the trio I had in my parts box that went onto my GSL 2013 "Group 13" category '49 Ford 3-wheeler. Pure eyeball engineering on getting the size right. What particularly defeats me is my innate lack of math sense. Measurements in thousandths, adding/subtracting on the mini-lathe or calipers have no meaning to me, so when it comes to one of my other projects of creating a dome wheel center with 15 indexed holes drilled into it to ultimately resemble a '52 MG TD steel wheel, it'll be a struggle for me to figure out how to do that 5 times identically (not into doing 1 and resin-casting the other 4 yet, either). I could do 1 dome shape about yay big with 4 or 8 or maybe 16 holes, but 15? No clue. And if the next wheel is a tad too big, that means I need to figure out how to use measurements to set the cutter accurately. At least there's Youtube videos on how to do indexed holes ....

50FordBullets.jpg.82fcd5c3e31fd94831ce062372739e7a.jpg

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Well it would appear that Francis is a big ol' fibber..........he said earlier that he is SLOW when it comes to building.  That is simply NOT true.  For the level of detail work and the perfect results, I can only say I would take me a whole lot longer.  Amazing work that reminds me of John Teresi (come on back soon John if you read this) in that not only is your work outstanding but you do it so quickly as well.   Cheers, tim

Edited by Codi

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Hello,

Jim: Thanks for your kind comments and following my thread!

Russell: You have done your job well and keep moving at your own pace! On the math side, I'm not a teacher but use the basis, a circle is 360 degrees so 360 divided by 15 is 24 (an hole at every 24 degrees with your rotary table if you have one). Thanks for visiting and come back any time!

Tim: PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE don't call me a cheater but I started this build on October 2018 (when I put the saw in the FORD body) .All the pictures on this thread have been taken during the following months. I do have probably over 100 pics of the progress so far but I didn't want to post all those pictures at the same time. I do have just the body, frame, wheels and some mechanicals components made so I think it's pretty slow build (in my opinion). I am very flattered to be compared to a name like John Teresi and I wish I will not dissapoint you... I'm currently working on the aluminum HEMI block and heads and spent over 100 hours on these 3 parts only (my most realistic creation to date) so I will post the pictures in the comming weeks. Thank for following my thread, I am honored!!!

Cheers, Francis

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2 hours ago, AmericanMuscleFan said:

... Russell: .. a circle is 360 degrees so 360 divided by 15 is 24 .. hole at every 24 degrees ...

Yep, math is like second nature to guys like you. Me, I looked at the puzzle like it was a pizza that could be divided up in 4 / 8 / 16 pieces, and then wondered how I could shove the lines over a bit to get rid of one slice. Another example of my style of problem-solving:  Is one wire thinner than another? Yep, when I lock my calipers on the thicker one, the thinner one doesn't catch in the jaws. What's the thickness of either? Beats me unless I'm using my digital readout one. The dial one spins around and its needle and its inscribed increments indicates some type of size. My former boss walks along sections of similar metal and says "Well, that one is 7 foot eleven, the other one is 4 foot 4, this one is 18 inches and that one is 36, so what's that total?" and I say, "Oh, 'bout the length of a Cadillac." Worst ever was the time when I needed to add 4 + 4 + 4 + 4, and reckoned the answer was 14 because of the way all the fours lined up. But days later I had to laugh at myself when driving down the street and seeing a 4x4 SUV with just that sticker designation, because right then I remembered what the right answer was.

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11 hours ago, Codi said:

Well it would appear that Francis is a big ol' fibber..........he said earlier that he is SLOW when it comes to building.  That is simply NOT true.  For the level of detail work and the perfect results, I can only say I would take me a whole lot longer.  Amazing work that reminds me of John Teresi (come on back soon John if you read this) in that not only is your work outstanding but you do it so quickly as well.   Cheers, tim

Gentlemen... If I may... Since I happen to have seen many of Francis' exquisite creations firsthand, and having discussed with him about his "production pace", may I suggest we settle for the term METICULOUS ?

Time is not of the essence in those circumstances, isn't it?

CT

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Having been living under a rock since mid December, I had missed this entire build. Just got caught up and have to say I'm very impressed with your 'meticulous' creation. I went through your '70 Plymouth thread and started searching for more of your work Francis. Big fan here and will be following along and learning something new with every post.

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Hello All,

Claude: Thanks to be my «bodyguard», I think you know me pretty well, it would be hard for me to deny that I'm a little bit meticulous but this could be easily applied to you too!

Brad: Welcome to my threads and for your interest for my builds, I will try to upload pictures of my other older builds in the next comming weeks and I will try to not dissapoint you!

In the nexts comming updates I will post more pictures of mechanicals components. Some parts may need to be fine tuned during the build progress and some detailling will be added during the final touch.

Front wheel spindle and brake caliper bracket on the milling (the chuck is mounted on the rotary table which is mounted on an angle table at 90 degrees).46_Front_Spindle_Milling.JPG.941845a8a7f9975492ddb0d5a031701a.JPG

Same part in a different angle47_Front_Spindle_Milling_2.JPG.8ae5c4fbe9331ad8a6412948e410f7b7.JPG

Brake calipers on the milling (these are the outside parts)48_Brake_Caliper_Milling.JPG.558be952963e8fd8481fa5c9e039a35e.JPG

Brake calipers (back parts mounted on the brackets). They are drilled edge to edge using 0.018’’ drill bit and will be mounted on the bracket with Scalehardware bolts. The brake disk will rotate freely inside the opening.49_Brake_Caliper_Milling_2.JPG.b1c77a7a73fd88dda419b5f6b203dead.JPG

Brake calipers almost done, I still have to add the brake fluid reservoir on the back.49b_Brake_Caliper_Spindle.JPG.9ac24617848264086be20211d8142244.JPG

Brake caliper temporarily mounted on its support for demonstration49c_Brake_Caliper_Spindle_Mock.JPG.07e517ecbb543d333cec16b528af8abc.JPG

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If you are trying not to disappoint, I'd say you succeeded. Holy schmoley that's beautiful.

Edited by gasser59

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6 hours ago, gasser59 said:

If you are trying not to disappoint, I'd say you succeeded. Holy schmoley that's beautiful.

I have no words so all I can do is to quote the above. 🤩😍😀

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9 hours ago, Atmobil said:

I have no words so all I can do is to quote the above. 🤩😍😀

I third this......................😱 

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Hello All,

Brad, Gaute, Jason: Thanks for the good words and wait to see the all aluminum Hemi I'm working on! More update comming soon (body and mechanical).

Cheers, Francis

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I only frequent this site on occasion but after seeing your GTX and now this WIP thread I'm hooked. 

Outstanding workmanship!

I'll def be following along, thank for sharing your process. I mean I wont heading out to buy a lathe ect, (maybe I should) lol, but I def am enjoying watching your process.

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Hello Pat: Thanks for visiting my threads and your kinds words!

These specialty tooling are not necessary but very helpfull to create those uncommom parts. More update pics of the D100 to come by the end of the week.

Cheers, Francis

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Hello All,

Another small update! To progress further, I need to put some rubber under that truck so I jumped in the mag wheels fabrication. I machined some different models of wheels in the past including the slots and centerlines but I wanted something different so I came with this design. I'ts probably an already existing design but I didn't made extensive searches so they might be not existing but I would be surprised since so many designs are available on the market. Anyway they are pretty simple but I'm very happy how they look🙂

Cheer, Francis

Mag wheels in progress

50_Mag_Wheel_Milling_1.JPG.dd92f141e3ec29b4c4576552b0767e10.JPG

I did created the design using different drill bits (pretty simple design but I’m pretty happy with the result). Bolt pattern is also done and the wheels will be mounted on hubs using threaded bolts from Scale Hardware (used as studs in my concept).

51_Mag_Wheel_Milling_2.JPG.b511953b29e243be254f32f407f75b6c.JPG

Front wheel different angle

52_Mag_Wheel_Milling_3.JPG.38afb2f24b052f74d3a02bfd773cbb80.JPG

Back wheel in progress on milling

53_Mag_Wheel_Milling_4.JPG.bc1a538efe9e028a4fc6a0279bbdb6cb.JPG

Back wheel on the lathe chuck before cut off. Will be turned front face to the lathe in order to machine the back side.

54_Mag_Wheel_Milling_5.JPG.f4c0b6e0ad815cc7ae65ccb6ea9e2375.JPG

Tires mounted on wheels. I will keep them unpolished finish (looks like magnesium). Just need to add valve stems from RB Motion.

55_Mag_Wheel_Tires.JPG.e122897aea30bdd92c36e27a1420d41d.JPG

Front wheel mounted temporary on hub showing a couple of brass threaded nuts from Scale Hardware (same technique for the back tires).

55b_Mag_Wheel_Nuts.JPG.ca16b2cd4893f808a108671fbd6423ac.JPG

Front wheel seen from the back showing the brake disc. Front wheels are mounted on a brass pins and spin freely.

55c_Mag_Wheel_Spindle.JPG.64e3827f2896ab93b4e22adf67848fdd.JPG

Mag wheels and tires different view showing back side (face to wheels hubs). Huge Sportsman tires for the back of the D100!!!

55d_Mag_Wheel_Spindle.JPG.d3816cf4bae8ba87990e396c4d15b9d8.JPG

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This is pure torture watching you make your own wheels. I'm gonna have to get the inside scoop on this. lol 

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Hello All,

Today's update is for the rear end with 4-link brackets and coilover suspension set-up.

I didn't get much comments on the mag wheels post (maybe you don't like them?) but I think they will look good on the final product and the holes pattern will enable to see the brake calipers.

Joe: Thanks to be so loyal my friend, you can count on my help and humble advice if someday you want to jump in machining your own parts!

Cheers, Francis

Rear caliper bracket in the milling chuck

56_Rear_Caliper_Bracket.JPG.86e7deacf621597a77b6592ae842dc5a.JPG

Rear end housing in the milling chuck57_Rear_End_Housing_Milling.JPG.c9888908a12c86a891f70d7585fb9599.JPG

Dana 60 rear end cover in the milling chuck.57b_Dana_Cover_Milling.JPG.1231c6abed96e5ef7068260aebd61479.JPG

Rear disk brake with threaded studs.57c_Rear_BrakeDisk.jpeg.90de4b94323de969a206eb41ce926076.jpeg

Rear disk brake different view.57d_Rear_BrakeDisk.JPG.e922ad8f1751899423bdb0296675430b.JPG

Rear brake calipers brackets final.57e_Rear_BrakesBrackets.JPG.15c91f675f733c3f8b92d364432f4735.JPG

Custom made differential 4-link brackets (made with 0.010’’ brass and welded using a resistance soldering unit).57f_Rear_4LinkBrackets.JPG.59aa28133521e0082532f11cefb2e4d8.JPG

Rear End components.57g_Rear_End_Components.JPG.fcaa4c84fcda5ec7162db88730ab4cad.JPG

Differential assembled with 4-link brackets, caliper bracket and disk brake/spindle combo. The brass axle spin freely inside the differential.58_Rear_End_Final.JPG.375a25cee637c7d5cf686307ab158d94.JPG

Functional rear coil over shocks (eyelets are from RB Motion)59_Rear_Functional_Shock.JPG.b9f2b60ca469d033428074485091624f.JPG

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