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89AKurt

CORIAN® scratch-building material

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CORIAN ® is the most common brand name for the plastic kitchen/bathroom countertop material introduced in 1971, installed in upscale homes.  To buy a countertop would be about $200 per lineal foot (2 square feet).  But if you hit up the right fabrication shop, they will give you scraps, such as sink cut-outs; just don't be picky about the color.  The best color is solid white, but the "granite" choices work too, but can have tiny bubbles entrained.  Then having some woodworking tools helps: table saw, cross-cut saw, drill press, and sanders would be ideal.  If you don't, at least a big vice, hacksaw, rasps and files, and the most useful tool is the Dremel with spiral bits.  It is very much like working with hardwood.  Sands really nice too.  Turns for round objects in the Dremel because it doesn't melt like styrene.  Drawback is that it's delicate when thin, shatters easily, does not bend at all.  Glues well with superglue and epoxy.

I've been using it for just about every project that has scratch-building, from conversions of sedans to convertibles, and curbside chassis, for coke coolers and luggage, to tiny parts such as horns.

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Edited by 89AKurt

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I guess that I have to save some scrap corian at work then....

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KURT, IT WILL BEND PRETTY EASY @ ABOUT 300DEGS, THAT'S WHAT WE DID AT MY OLD JOB WHEN WE WERE THERMOFORMING SHOWER BASES, THE 1/4" THICK MATERIAL WILL ALSO BEND EASY WITH A HEAT GUN

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I like Corian so much, I have n@ked time around it every day for over 13 years!  I love the huge beautiful tile shower in the guest bathroom, but the Corian in the master is much easier to clean.

IMG_20200206_200819.jpg

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I came across a few chunks of Corian years ago, and have used them for sanding blocks for dust nibs and runs (gasp!) ever since, in 1:1 projects.

Never thought about using them in scale...

Thanks! :)

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14 hours ago, Rodent said:

I like Corian so much, I have n@ked time around it every day for over 13 years!  I love the huge beautiful tile shower in the guest bathroom, but the Corian in the master is much easier to clean.

IMG_20200206_200819.jpg

way tooo much information....

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I love the granite seats, they should wear well although not too comfy.  

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23 hours ago, peteski said:

I looked it up: Corian it a type of acrylic. ...

And all this time, I thought Kurt had some extra tough grinder bits to carve up solidified powder faux rock material.

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13 hours ago, El Roberto said:

I love the granite seats, they should wear well although not too comfy.  

Cast iron a$$ for long drives.

On 2/6/2020 at 9:19 PM, Rodent said:

I like Corian so much, I have n@ked time around it every day for over 13 years! [...]

[...]

🙄

get off my lawn.jpg

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Way back in the early '90s, I worked at a friend's kitchen and bath store where a lot of Corian was used. To join two panels at the ends and hide the seam, there was a special adhesive that my friend said was "liquid Corian" - it had a large tube of the stuff and a very small tube of hardener. Has anyone here worked with it?

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40 minutes ago, ChrisBcritter said:

Way back in the early '90s, I worked at a friend's kitchen and bath store where a lot of Corian was used. To join two panels at the ends and hide the seam, there was a special adhesive that my friend said was "liquid Corian" - it had a large tube of the stuff and a very small tube of hardener. Has anyone here worked with it?

While I have not worked with that adhesive, your memory seems correct.  Quoting the Corian article I pointed to earlier:

Seamless appearance: In the fabrication process, joints can be made nearly invisible by joining the relevant pieces with Corian's own color-matched two-part acrylic adhesive. The pieces are clamped tightly together in order to express any excess adhesive. After the adhesive dries, the area is sanded and polished to create a near-seamless joint. This seamless appearance is a signature characteristic of the material.

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On 2/9/2020 at 3:19 PM, ChrisBcritter said:

Way back in the early '90s, I worked at a friend's kitchen and bath store where a lot of Corian was used. To join two panels at the ends and hide the seam, there was a special adhesive that my friend said was "liquid Corian" - it had a large tube of the stuff and a very small tube of hardener. Has anyone here worked with it?

I have not.  Sounds like a proprietary thing only certified installers would have.  I paint everything, so no need for it.

Thought I would post latest projects using this stuff.  Hat pattern:
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Fan shroud pattern:
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