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towman1271

Paint issue

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 Bought the resin conversion posted below. The cab and hood are different shades. It needs to be painted white. But I have used grey, white and even the red colored primer and the white comes out different shades. Any suggestions.

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I had this happen once. I think it has to do with number of coats and how paint is applied. What I didn't do, and you should, is tape the hood and cab together and paint as one unit. It helps keep the paint application equal on both parts.

If they are painted separately, you run the risk of not applying the paint the same way. Not as much of a problem with dark colors.

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I would suggest using the Gray primer in very light coats in order to find any imperfections on the body surface. When you're satisfied with the body then start with a light coats of the White primer. White and just about any other light shade will turn out best over a White primer as this tends to brighten the finished color coats. Most medium to dark shades usually work best with Gray or Red primers. The White paint tends to have less pigment and it is best to use several very light coat to get good coverage. 

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I've seen light primers carry the shade casts of color variation on styrene and imagine the same is true with resin. The effect can come through as almost a glow from the back side of the parts, the parts aren't truly 100% opaque. So my work around is to prime inside and out with dark primer like charcoal grey or black. Then reprime the front where I want white paint or other light color for that matter, in white or platinum primer before putting down the base coat. Especially important to get back to white with white pearl base coats that are not opaque either. You have to get a barrier coat down to block what I call the lamp shade effect. Just my take on it without knowing more information. But you might try what I'm suggesting. And what ever you do, do it to everything.

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I agree that this may be coming from the resin itself, and recommend your first coat be a layer of etching primer to serve as a barrier. I use this to prevent bleed-through on kits molded in red plastic. Etching or "self-etching" primers are widely available these days in spray cans. I know my Harbor Freight, Wal-Mart, and Autozone have a version, and I'm sure you'll be able to find some. You may decant it and airbrush it, or some spray good enough right out of the can; you just need a thin even coat. Use your favorite light colored primer on top of this, and paint away.

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