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Spindlerm464

65 chevelle, challenger, 1940s Willy gasser

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Here’s my first three attempts at a model kit. Overall I’m happy with them but definitely could use some improvement. Right now I’m chasing a gloss mirrored finish, cleaner glueing, and I need some work with bmf 

 

im hoping to get some tips, suggestions, and advice and grow my skill! Thanks in advance. First one I did was the challenger, then the chevelle, and I finished the gasser last night.

painted on a p.o.s. Undersized compressor using a badger 105 and zero paints. You can definitely see improvement in each of them. Please hit me with comments, suggestions and critique

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Overall, they look pretty good.

One thing I notice is the windshields, which all look scratched.  Be very careful handling them.  If they don't come in their own wrapper in the kit, I put them in a baggie immediately so they don't get scratched.  Minor scratches can be eliminated by going over the glass with a super light coat of Future floor polish.  I also use either Testors windshield adhesive or 5-minute epoxy to glue them in.  I haven't used regular styrene glue on a windshield in years!  Hope this helps.

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Yes thanks a lot! I started with ca glue and was very upset. I was then using restore clear parts cement using a toothpick to apply drops in just the corners. The results got noticeably better. I seem to get lots of finger prints while doing the finishing touches. I was hoping someone would comment a clear I can use. I’ve also been searching for threads on making headlights more realistic. Are you guys painting colors over the factory chrome of the kit? 
 

I appreciate the input guys! I look at the other under the glass cars and they are immaculate, I guess we all have to start somewhere

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I can definitely see improvements. Keep at it! There are lots of helpful tips it the Tips section of the forum Also if you see something someone has done, just ask they will help you if they can. Welcome and good luck.

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Posted (edited)

These look great for your first model builds.

You obviously have the talent to do this well, and getting the skill to turn out models you're really happy with just takes work.

Talent is what you're born with. Skill is what you develop by continually exercising your talent. And just as in playing the piano, some folks don't have the talent to get really good, but still find it enjoyable.

The advice about using epoxy or white PVA "canopy" glue for your windows is good.

It's easy to get epoxy fingerprints on windows though, very hard to remove, but you'll learn to keep your fingers clean as you build more models.

I prefer the white PVA glues for windows, as it's water-soluble when wet, and fingerprints can be removed with a damp swab or paper towel. The stuff also dries clear, and disappears completely if used correctly.

The downside is that the PVA glues don't have much strength when they're wet. For best results, I've found windows need to be jigged or taped in place while the PVA sets up.

Here are some headlight threads...   (type this into Google for several more: modelcarsmag realistic headlights)

 

 

Edited by Ace-Garageguy

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These are pretty impressive for someone's first try. Another way to get additional inspiration and building tips would be to check the Tips, Tricks, Tutorials section on the forum. Many builders have posted information on many different aspects of model building. I have checked there at times when I'm having a problem with something I'm working on.  

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The engine on the Willys looks really good.  You did well using the wash to bring out the detail.

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Here are some tips to help with the glass smudges.

 

First, before you are going to install it, check the fit to be certain that it will fit properly.

Once you know it will, clean the glass with Windex, liquid polish, or whatever you prefer.

Set the glass aside and leave it alone.

 

Get some 2 part epoxy, such as JB Weld "Clear Weld", which you can pick up at most auto parts stores or on line.

Mix a small amount of the epoxy and apply a small bead of it around the inside of the windshield frame of the body.

If possible, depending on the size of the glass, keep the epoxy back away from the edge of the trim about 1/8" or so to allow a little positioning room.

Now just walk away for 5 to 10 minutes to allow the epoxy to tack up.

I wait until the glue is nearly set completely so that when I insert a tooth pick into the leftover glue, it basically dents it, but does not make "strings" of glue when pulled back out.

 

Then very carefully position the top of the glass into the opening and then slowly lay the glass into the opening.

You will then be able to make slight adjustments if necessary, but do not lift the glass.

Once positioned, you can lightly press the glass into the nearly cured glue.

Allowing the glue to set up to this point will help eliminate glue "squeeze out" resulting in glue smudges from your fingers.

 

After allowing the glue to continue curing for another ten minutes or so, you should be able to go back and "press" the glass again to be certain that it is secure and tight.

 

After the glue has cured for 24 hours or so, go back and clean it again, inside and out with the cleaner of your choice before continuing with any other assembly.

 

 

 

 

Steve

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^^^ You can take what Steve says to the bank. His builds are among the best of the best.

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I use windshield glue and Future Floor Polish for the windows. I first run a small bead of windshield glue around the perimeter of the opening. After it has set enough to hold, I take a small paint brush, dip it in Future Floor Polish and then just touch it to the edge of the glass on the inside around the perimeter. The future will wick into any voids there may be. I allow it to set overnight and then remove any fingerprints with a soft cotton cloth. Once the future is set, you won't have to worry about knocking it loose while cleaning. I also use a thick coat of windshield glue over chrome headlights.   

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Posted (edited)

Another technique is to use one of the UV light setting glues like "Laser Bond" to initially set the glass in place.

You can place the glass into the opening, put a few thin strips of tape strategically around the glass to hold it securely and then put a few dabs of Laser Bond around the perimeter of the edge of the glass. ( maybe every inch or so).

Zap it with the light and the glass should be positioned correctly at this point.

Remove the tape and fill all the way around the perimeter with clear 2 part epoxy.

After the epoxy dries, it will take 2 men and a boy to knock the glass loose. ^_^

 

Clean the glass inside and out and continue with assembly.

 

 

 

Steve

Edited by StevenGuthmiller

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Thanks a lot for all of the tips! I appreciate it. I’m waiting for my new compressor, I got a master airbrush tc40t on the way. I think glowing the proper pressure with a better water filter will help. I also decided to order a quick connect setup with in in line air trap just for extra help lol

im definitely going to try the epoxy on the next build, I will be making an active thread I hope you all follow and chime in on!
 

i have added bmf around the windows to the willys, didn’t come out as clean as some of the work I have seen but it wasn’t horrible. I had issues with the bmf pulling up and tearing as opposed to being sliced through. I will be searching the forums for more guides and definitely looking into those headlight threads

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22 hours ago, StevenGuthmiller said:

Here are some tips to help with the glass smudges.

 

First, before you are going to install it, check the fit to be certain that it will fit properly.

Once you know it will, clean the glass with Windex, liquid polish, or whatever you prefer.

Set the glass aside and leave it alone.

 

Get some 2 part epoxy, such as JB Weld "Clear Weld", which you can pick up at most auto parts stores or on line.

Mix a small amount of the epoxy and apply a small bead of it around the inside of the windshield frame of the body.

If possible, depending on the size of the glass, keep the epoxy back away from the edge of the trim about 1/8" or so to allow a little positioning room.

Now just walk away for 5 to 10 minutes to allow the epoxy to tack up.

I wait until the glue is nearly set completely so that when I insert a tooth pick into the leftover glue, it basically dents it, but does not make "strings" of glue when pulled back out.

 

Then very carefully position the top of the glass into the opening and then slowly lay the glass into the opening.

You will then be able to make slight adjustments if necessary, but do not lift the glass.

Once positioned, you can lightly press the glass into the nearly cured glue.

Allowing the glue to set up to this point will help eliminate glue "squeeze out" resulting in glue smudges from your fingers.

 

After allowing the glue to continue curing for another ten minutes or so, you should be able to go back and "press" the glass again to be certain that it is secure and tight.

 

After the glue has cured for 24 hours or so, go back and clean it again, inside and out with the cleaner of your choice before continuing with any other assembly.

 

 

 

 

Steve

Steve, this is genius!  I have always wondered how to eliminate "squeeze out" when using the 2-part epoxy!  

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