Jump to content
Model Cars Magazine Forum
jjsipes

1989 Darrell Waltrip Tide Monte Carlo

Recommended Posts

Original Tide Monte Carlo kit with Powerslide decals. Tamiya Floursecent Orange, Testors Classic White.

20200507_163736.jpg

20200507_163741.jpg

20200507_163744.jpg

20200507_163752.jpg

20200507_163753.jpg

20200507_163759.jpg

20200507_163813.jpg

Edited by jjsipes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Excellent build in every way. Paint, decalling, and Very clean .  What's the story behind the Hoosier mommy, Hoosier daddy tires?  Was everybody using them at that time or just Waltrips team?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, MarkJ said:

Excellent build in every way. Paint, decalling, and Very clean .  What's the story behind the Hoosier mommy, Hoosier daddy tires?  Was everybody using them at that time or just Waltrips team?

If I remember correctly, (I was only around 12 then) Hoosier was trying to get into the sport and alot of the times had a better tire but Goodyear with it's long standing with Nascar prevailed. Nascar finally required tire manufacturers to have enough tires at the track for all teams and Hoosier Hoosier couldn't compete at that level. I some teams ran and some didn't. I like when you see a car with Goodyear on the front fender but the car ran Hoosier during the race. Please correct me if I'm wrong.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe you are totally correct on the tire deal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Superb paint and decal job Jason!  This is a very significative car and one of the most recognizable NASCAR with this big Tide logo on the hood.  Well done sir!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Beautiful car, love the build, and here is an excerpt of the 1998-99 tire wars between goodyear and hoosier. There is also a documentary on youtube about it

 

"

In 1986, NASCAR was worried when Goodyear faced a hostile takeover that potentially threatened the manufacturer's racing program.[7][8] Because of this, NASCAR invited Hoosier as a backup plan.[3][4]

In 1988, Hoosier entered the Winston Cup Series.[1] Hoosier gained an early advantage at the second race of the season at Richmond, where Morgan Shepherd took the pole and Neil Bonnett won the race and at Rockingham two weeks later using Hoosiers. During the season, NASCAR allowed teams to switch between Goodyear and Hoosier tires. Teams learned that Hoosiers were softer and faster while Goodyears were more durable and safer. Because of this, Goodyear spent money on developing a faster tire.[3][4]

The tire war took its toll on several drivers, who were injured from accidents caused by tire failures. The most notable of these incidents was during the 1988 Coca-Cola 600. Goodyear withdrew their tires after practice when it was discovered that their compound was too soft for the track; as a result, all drivers except Dave Marcis switched to Hoosiers over safety concerns. The move proved disastrous in the race, as Hoosier tire failures resulted in crashes that injured Bonnett, Rick Wilson, and Harry Gant. Darrell Waltrip, who also ran on Hoosiers, won the race.[9] Despite this setback, Hoosier rebounded when Bill Elliott drove the tires to victory lane at the 1988 Firecracker 400 at Daytona.[3][4]

Goodyear was dealt a major blow at the July Pocono race when their tires were disqualified for being too wide on their treads, resulting in the manufacturer missing a NASCAR race for the first time since the 1956 Southern 500. Three weeks later, Hoosier was disqualified from the Watkins Glen race for the same infraction. The tire war intensified at Dover when several cars suffered from tire failures. Alan Kulwicki, who was one of the tire failure victims, commented: "Not only did it cost us our chance for a win or a good finish in this race, but we wrecked a race car in the process. It's not like this is the second week in a row it's been happening; it's been happening all year long. Really, a little bit disappointed that the tire companies can't get this solved by now. That people are still crashing cars like this, you know. Fortunately, the cars are pretty safe and no one got hurt." At the end of the 1988 season, Hoosier won nine out of the 29 races.[10][3][4]

In 1989, Goodyear planned to roll out its new radial tires at the Daytona 500 to prove their superiority to Hoosier's bias-plytires. However, when Dale Earnhardt and Elliott experienced tire failures during practice, with Elliott sustaining a broken wrist, Goodyear withdrew all of their radial tires from Daytona.[11] This setback gave Hoosier a major head start, with Waltrip driving on Hoosiers to win the Daytona 500. Hoosier dominated the first four races of the season, with Rusty Wallace's win at the 1989 Pontiac Excitement 400 at Richmond eventually becoming the tire manufacturer's final win of the season. Goodyear's radial tires made their debut at the 1989 First Union 400 at North Wilkesboro Speedway. While Wallace won the pole on Hoosiers, he was lapped by the lead cars by lap 70. Using the Goodyear radials' high durability to his advantage, Earnhardt won the race. This was the death blow for Hoosier, who left NASCAR after the 1989 Winston 500 at Talladega when they could not sell enough tires to be economically viable.[12][1][13][14][3][4]"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...