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Ok, how would you change a tire on this?  Yeah, I know, you'd probably never drive a custom like this but the tires might eventually need a repair or replacement.  

 

 

 

1937 Lincoln Illusion - Rick Dore @Bellesautosdhier / Facebook.com

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The bottoms of the fenders are removable, if you look closely you can see the shut lines

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1 hour ago, stitchdup said:

The bottoms of the fenders are removable, if you look closely you can see the shut lines

I was hoping those weren't pinstripes I was looking at.

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36 minutes ago, Bucky said:

I was hoping those weren't pinstripes I was looking at.

Those *ARE* pinstripes.  Actually this car has hydraulic lifts built in (like RVs have, but longer), plus the suspension is also on hydraulics, so while the car is raised up, it and the wheels wheels can drop down.  Slick, huh? They spared no expense!  :D

Edited by peteski

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Cool! So, I'm not crazy, after all! HAHAHHA

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Not sure about changing tires, but that front tire looks pretty close to the fender. What kind of turning radius does that thing have.?

Jeff 

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BTW guys - I have no idea - I was just having some fun with my imagination. :)

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8 hours ago, Goose1957 said:

Not sure about changing tires, but that front tire looks pretty close to the fender. What kind of turning radius does that thing have.?

Jeff 

Could be like the Ida '39 Merc, where the skirts move in and out while turning.

 

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If I had the money to drive that I would call AAA to change the tire, wouldn't want to mess up Armani jeans..

Edited by TarheelRick

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Shows cars are definitely not built with the same concessions to practicality that we expect on our real cars.

A friend of mine has build up a mid-60s GTO. Complete custom, frame up, nothing left stock.

If one of the rear tires gets a flat, it has to go on a flat deck back to the shop, and be disassembled. Suspension and exhaust needs to come out. The rear wheels are so wide, and the car sits so low, that the only way to make everything was to run the exaust under the suspension. It looks awesome, but is kind of ridiculous.

 

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Covered wheels are nothing new - remember the Nash "bathtub" cars from the late '40s?  Of course there were custom cars from earlier era which had fully covered wheels too. Nash was a standard production car.

32ed7253e40a809707b9cc6c25de6a24.jpg

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Nash was still rocking those covered wheels in the early '50's.  This 1953 Nash Ambassador Custom four-door is playing a police car in the 1955 movie "The Fast & the Furious."  That was a Roger Corman movie. When the 2007 "Fast & Furious" franchise started up, they had to pay Corman for their use of the name.

That original "Fast & Furious" is about road racing, so it's full of vintage sports cars. Definitely worth a look, and you can catch it sometimes on Turner Classic Movies.

nash_53.jpg

Edited by Mike999
omit

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4 hours ago, Mike999 said:

Nash was still rocking those covered wheels in the early '50's.  This 1953 Nash Ambassador Custom four-door is playing a police car in the 1955 movie "The Fast & the Furious."  That was a Roger Corman movie. When the 2007 "Fast & Furious" franchise started up, they had to pay Corman for their use of the name.

That original "Fast & Furious" is about road racing, so it's full of vintage sports cars. Definitely worth a look, and you can catch it sometimes on Turner Classic Movies.

nash_53.jpg

This picture triggered some old memories for myself. When I was in high school, in the last century, a buddy of mine had a two door hardtop Nash of this body style. He would often drive it as if he stole it. The car would lean over so far in the corners you could hear the curb feelers scratching the street on the right side. He also had a hard time with some of his girlfriends fathers when he would pick them up for a date. I wonder why?  

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7 minutes ago, espo said:

He also had a hard time with some of his girlfriends fathers when he would pick them up for a date. I wonder why?  

?

nash_airliner_seats.jpg

Edited by Mike999
goof

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Just now, Mike999 said:

?

 

 

nash_airliner_seats.jpg

Smile. I guess old dad know about that feature also. This used to make parents nervous before the advent of the Surfer Van craze. 

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14 hours ago, Joe Handley said:

Could be like the Ida '39 Merc, where the skirts move in and out while turning.

 

That's pretty cool.  Like the cowl induction, or is it the original air grabber scoop. Pretty neat to watch. Thanks for sharing. 

Jeff 

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