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Just a quick question about my airbrush compressor.How much psi do you think it would build

when used with a small tank? I want to make a tank to stop the pulsing when using my airbrush.

Thoughts.....

 

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Yes, what John said. I have a few compressors and usually airbrush around 25 psi. On a few paints I run it lower. Example is the Alclad Chrome. I spray several coats, very lightly at 10 psi and I have better results with the chrome look than If I spray is like regular colors in a single shot. For the paints I have used so far, I have never run over 25 psi.

You will want a regulator to control pressure at the output and pressurize the air tank to higher pressure, like 40 psi or so.  If you ever inflate things like bicycle or car tires you need higher pressures. I have an old bigger compressor that I use for tires and such.

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Agree completely with the others. The only time I turn my airbrush up to 40 is blasting thinner through it for cleaning. 

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Posted (edited)

I think he might be asking about the tank pressure not spraying pressure. I have an old Sears Craftsman pancake compressor that has a regulator that shuts off the pump at 125 psi. If that helps. Can paint at 15 to 20 psi for a couple of hours which is usually the limit of my paint sessions. 
 

l’d be careful about making your own pressure vessel though. Unless you know what you’re doing, it could be a bit dicey!

If you really need to store air, Harbor Freight sells a separate air tank that can be filled for off site use. For the price it may be a safer option.😉

Edited by JohnU
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I use a Bluehawk 2.g air compressor , with my Paasche VL.  It has 6 feet of line. I can usually set it @ 30, and control it at the brush. I do have to adjust lower sometimes if I am doing shading.  

blue-hawk-air-compressor-0214-1_1822016205252854031.jpg

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 I know building a pressure tank is not to be taken lightly but was thinking if I use material rated for

2000 lbs would be ok.It would only be 8 inches long and maybe 4 inches in diameter.You dont think

at 40/45 lbs it would hold ? If you guys think its a bad idea I guess I wont but I need something small.

living in an apartment has it's limitations and I just dont have room for a compressor or large air tank.

More thoughts?

 

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I would shop around for a small ready made air tank. I definitely wouldn't try to make one myself. The consequences can be very bad if something like a weld or threaded fitting should fail.

Having worked as a pipefitter for over 40 years, I've seen results of what a tank under pressure can do when it blows up.

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I created my own air reserve tank from a truck air brake reservoir.  It is a 5 gallon tank and rated at 150 psi continuous.  I got it from a neighbor who was a diesel mechanic when they were scraping some unused parts.  Apparently they replace these with some frequency and are quite cheap, but you know if they are used on a road going semi they will more than stand up to whatever my compressor can throw at it.  Mine has been working with a Craftsman black pancake compressor for well over 30 years.  It adds enough reserve to run an airbrush all night long. 

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I wonder if those truck air reservoirs are replaced regularly to prevent them from bursting. I suspect that there might be water condensing in them, possibly rusting the inside of the tank.  They rather be safe than have the tank blow up.  That is why air compressors with tanks have drain valve to drain the condensation.  I hope the one you got was an new one rather than the ones they were scrapping.  But I guess if you have been using it for 30 years, that tank doesn't owe you anything either way.

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Posted (edited)

Well it looks like I'm looking for a small tank but wow,I would not have thought 40 pounds could

be so bad.Guys even use pvc to plumb their shops for air and had a guy who wanted to do my place

with it and I was going to use steel for the tank. Well live and learn,thanks guys.

 

Edited by dartman
1

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PVC pipes (used for household plumbing) and compressed air are not a good combination.

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You could pick up a 5 gallon air tank at any of the big box stores like Meijer for dirt cheap! Those tanks are used to fill tires up with air... I used a simple "T" fitting with my compressor... It'll hold 100 psi easy... I'll post a picture of my setup when I get a chance....

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55 minutes ago, peteski said:

PVC pipes (used for household plumbing) and compressed air are not a good combination.

I absolutely agree with this. Copper or stainless steel pipe with compression fittings would be this old pipefitter's choice for air lines.

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I had the opportunity to plumb air into my basement when I built my house, I used PVC pipe. The compressor is in the garage with a Y leaving an outlet in the garage and  regulated before the pipe, I have had no problems, another regulator at the end before coupler for the airbrush. Line ends at my spray booth.

greg

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8 hours ago, peteski said:

I wonder if those truck air reservoirs are replaced regularly to prevent them from bursting. I suspect that there might be water condensing in them, possibly rusting the inside of the tank.  They rather be safe than have the tank blow up.  That is why air compressors with tanks have drain valve to drain the condensation.  I hope the one you got was an new one rather than the ones they were scrapping.  But I guess if you have been using it for 30 years, that tank doesn't owe you anything either way.

Peter, on this side of the pond to meet DOT standards they have to be coated inside and out to prevent corrosion.  When I plumbed it, I stood it vertically so there was a fitting in the bottom.  I put a ball valve in that end and drain it regularly.  I get far more water out of the pancake tank then I ever get out of the reservoir. What I get out of the reservoir after 30 years is still clear water.  The pancake almost always is rusty.   If I know the DOT, the replacement is out of an abundance of caution.  It is more likely that the fittings would fail because of the vibration of constant use on the roads.  At any rate, on the road it would get far more abuse than sitting in my shop.  Yes, it was a new one.  They scrap them because each truck company has it's own proprietary design. As the trucks age, the NOS is tossed. 

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Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, peteski said:

PVC pipes (used for household plumbing) and compressed air are not a good combination.

Oh, yes!  Even schedule 40 is not meant for compressed air.  Unlike metal pipe, PVC turns into shrapnel when it blows.  Never do that, please!  Here is a web site on the subject.  Worth reading. https://www.pvcfittingsonline.com/resource-center/using-pvc-pipe-for-compressed-air/

 

Edited by Pete J.

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9 hours ago, Bucky said:

I absolutely agree with this. Copper or stainless steel pipe with compression fittings would be this old pipefitter's choice for air lines.

Yeah,I used copper to plumb it not pvc lol

 

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8 hours ago, Pete J. said:

Peter, on this side of the pond to meet DOT standards they have to be coated inside and out to prevent corrosion.  When I plumbed it, I stood it vertically so there was a fitting in the bottom.  I put a ball valve in that end and drain it regularly.  I get far more water out of the pancake tank then I ever get out of the reservoir. What I get out of the reservoir after 30 years is still clear water.  The pancake almost always is rusty.   If I know the DOT, the replacement is out of an abundance of caution.  It is more likely that the fittings would fail because of the vibration of constant use on the roads.  At any rate, on the road it would get far more abuse than sitting in my shop.  Yes, it was a new one.  They scrap them because each truck company has it's own proprietary design. As the trucks age, the NOS is tossed. 

Thanks for the explanation Pete.  Sounds like you're safe!

BTW, I'm on *YOUR* side of the "pond".  New England is in the Northeastern USA. :)

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2 hours ago, peteski said:

Thanks for the explanation Pete.  Sounds like you're safe!

BTW, I'm on *YOUR* side of the "pond".  New England is in the Northeastern USA. :)

OOPS, Saw the england, missed the new.  😵

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Why build an air compressor when there are many readily available for you application at reasonable prices out there?

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15 hours ago, Southern Fried said:

Why build an air compressor when there are many readily available for you application at reasonable prices out there?

I am not building an air compressor I was going to build a very small tank for my airbrush compressor to eliminate

the pulsing from the little compressor.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, dartman said:

I am not building an air compressor I was going to build a very small tank for my airbrush compressor to eliminate

the pulsing from the little compressor.

You need a regulator, which regulates the pressure.

And, these small tanks are available: https://www.lowes.com/pd/Kobalt-Multi-Purpose-Air-Tank/50126548

879686004486.jpg?size=pdhi

 

Edited by Casey

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Same thing at Harbor Freight 

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