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Deuces ll

Clear yellow high beams...

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Posted (edited)

I'm was thinking about painting the high beam lenses a clear yellow for my Revell Chevelle SS model kits... 😎 What paint do you guys recommend???..… I've read in the past that you could mix yellow food coloring with Future.. Have any of you tried that yet???....

mecum_12 (1).jpg

Edited by Deuces ll

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Tamiya X24 Clear Yellow would do the trick. 

If you already have yellow food coloring and Future on hand, that would be easy enough to test on some scrap clear sprue (and would likely come off with some rubbing alcohol if the experiment doesn't work out as planned).

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I've had very realistic results coloring the back of the lenses with a yellow Sharpie highlighter...sometimes a few coats to get it as dark as I want.

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Cool!... Thanks Ace!!... 🙂

It's a lot easier picking one of those up than it is getting a bottle of Tamiya paint... 😞🙄

Especially around my neck of the woods....

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Posted (edited)

Targets here I come....

e8bbb07a-2ea5-45fd-a788-d61361906252_1.637c5bc0dcb3478dcb44dbe2fdf4437b.jpeg

Edited by Deuces ll

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What you show is *NOT* a highlighter - it is a permanent marker.  The solvent in can craze the clear plastic lenses are made of.  I believe that Ace was mentioning a water-based hi-lighter marker.  I still prefer Tamiya transparent yellow paint/

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Thanks Pete.... Guess I'll have to experiment on a clear plastic spoon or sprue tree.... Thanks again!....

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What if I coated 2 of the lenses in Future first and then use the Sharpie after the lenses dried????.... That might work.... I hope!

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1 hour ago, Deuces ll said:

What if I coated 2 of the lenses in Future first and then use the Sharpie after the lenses dried????.... That might work.... I hope!

Worth a try . . .  Try on a piece of sprue (runner) made from the same plastic as the lenses (clear spoon might use different formulation of polystyrene).

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I wish I could send you some of the Tamiya clear yellow I have leftover from painting just these two foglights!

50062475668_9225ac878f_b.jpg

1:24 Tamiya Renault 5 Turbo kit by Spottedlaurel, on Flickr

The kit didn't have clear lenses there so I painted the clear onto BMF.

Now need to build more kits with yellow lights to justify the paint......

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Posted (edited)

I use Sharpies often.  I have a multi-color pack I keep at my work bench.  These tail lights are orange Sharpie with the chrome surround on the lights was done with silver.

DSCN1698

Brown was used to create the wood affect on this steering wheel.  The gauge trim rings were done in silver.

DSCN3249

Edited by afx

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11 hours ago, peteski said:

What you show is *NOT* a highlighter - it is a permanent marker.  The solvent in can craze the clear plastic lenses are made of.  I believe that Ace was mentioning a water-based hi-lighter marker.  I still prefer Tamiya transparent yellow paint/

I've used Sharpie permanent markers in several colors (including black and silver) on both raw styrene (clear and colored) and several kinds of paint and never had a crazing problem of any kind. 

 

9 hours ago, Deuces ll said:

What if I coated 2 of the lenses in Future first and then use the Sharpie after the lenses dried????.... That might work.... I hope!

The solvent in perm Sharpies might--MIGHT--affect Future, as it seems to be alcohol based. At least I know that alcohol will remove both Future and perm Sharpie. 

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Well.. I'll try the spoon test first and see what happens....

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This was just done with a yellow Sharpie and a really cheap clear plastic spoon without the Future barrier clear coat..... Looks pretty good!... 🙂👍

IMG_20200802_095901.jpg

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2 hours ago, afx said:

I use Sharpies often.  I have a multi-color pack I keep at my work bench.  These tail lights are orange Sharpie with the chrome surround on the lights was done with silver.

DSCN1698

Brown was used to create the wood affect on this steering wheel.  The gauge trim rings were done in silver.

DSCN3249

Very cool.....😎

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Posted (edited)

I'm glad that the Sharpie permanent marker worked for you.  I had problems with it slightly crazing clear styrene, but that was probably 20 years ago.  I have not tried it ever since.  Back then Sharpies had a very distinctive, strong solvent odor (more in line with lacquer thinner than with alcohol). It possible that in those 20 years, they've changed the ink formula to be more environmentally friendly (and just alcohol-based).  I figured that I would mention my experience - better safe than sorry.

Edited by peteski

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Thanks Pete.. I haven't touched the lenses yet, but I will when get started on this Chevelle build...

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Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, peteski said:

I'm glad that the Sharpie permanent marker worked for you.  I had problems with it slightly crazing clear styrene, but that was probably 20 years ago.  I have not tried it ever since.  Back then Sharpies had a very distinctive, strong solvent odor (more in line with lacquer thinner than with alcohol). It possible that in those 20 years, they've changed the ink formula to be more environmentally friendly (and just alcohol-based).  I figured that I would mention my experience - better safe than sorry.

REAL Sharpie permanent markers contained toluene and/or xylene. That's what the solvent smell was. Toluene/xylene do affect styrene by causing it to craze. Styrene was etched by the old Sharpies. It was the same effect with original formula Floquil enamel paints which, if you remember, required the use of a barrier coat to protect styrene surfaces from damage.  The formula for Sharpies was changed to a more environmentally-friendly, and less permanent, alcohol-based type. What passes as Sharpie permanent markers today is not in the same league, as far as actual permanence is concerned, when compared to the old formula variety.

Edited by SfanGoch

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