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Bernard Kron

’29 Model A Highboy Roadster - Updated 12/20

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This is based on the Replicas & Miniatures Company of Maryland (RMCM) resin kit I reviewed earlier this year. The plan is to make it very period correct for around 1950. The kit chassis is based on the Revellogram ’32 Ford Chassis so the first thing I did was install an AMT ’29 Model A cross member. The banjo rear axle and spring is a Revell ’29 Ford set. In the mockup it’s all chrome and I think I may leave it that way, since this kind of heavy chroming was actually very much in fashion at the time. Front suspension comes from the Revell ’32 setup but has been modified to lower it slightly. I plan to install split wishbones at the front. I will run tube shocks front and rear. Brakes will be Ford drum brakes all around.

The motor is the flathead from the Revell ’32 Sedan, but I removed the kit transmission and installed a resin RMCM La Salle box in its place. The intake manifold is from the sedan kit. I’m going to install the Model Car Garage Stromberg 97 detail set and an RMCM resin Harmon Collins magneto. The MCG 97’s are so pretty I may not put any air filter or scoops on them.

The body and interior will be kit stock. The dash will be either an Auburn gauge panel or a set of period round gauges. Both are sourced from RMCM and I will decide which one once I receive them. The steering wheel will be a ’40 ford unit,

The wheels and tires will be steelies running skinny bias ply Big ‘n’ Littles. In the pics you’ll see a set I made from the chrome steelies that come in the Revell ’49 Mercury where I painted the centers red and installed '’39 Ford hubcaps. They are very pretty but I haven’t decided if I will run them on this build or not.

The exterior and dash will be a deep maroon with a chrome p/e grill. The interior will be tan.

This may seem like a very straightforward build, and in fact it is. But I was stymied for quite a while because I’ve developed a nasty allergy to super glue. Since the build is mostly resin I had to figure out what to do. My LHS recommended a contact cement called Goo. It’s a bit stringy and tricky to apply and you have to be careful on resin because it can soften the surface if you get it on something that will show. But with practice it seems to work quite well so I’ve finally gotten going on this thing.

This is part of a series of traditional rods I’ve got in process. Among them I’ve got a ’32 roadster based on the “traditional†’32 frame that Rik Hoving mastered for RMCM and which was also in my review last summer. This uses the Revell ’29 Ford suspension setup front and rear and imposes a flathead on you due to the way the frame is made. This will also be an early 50’s period build. It also uses parts on order from the aftermarket so I’m building it alongside the ’29. I’ll post it separately once I have something to show.

Along with the aftermarket parts the weather is the other long pole in the tent because it’s cold and rainy up here in the Pacific Northwest so paint is a hit or miss proposition.

Thanx for lookin’...

(Click on picture for larger image)

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Edited by gbk1

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Oh yeah, Bernard!! That little Model A body looks right at home sitting on top of those pinched '32 frame rails!! ;)

Those wheels definately hit the mark you're aiming for and time warp this little late night street cruiser right back to the early 50's!! :)

I can't wait to see pics of the other roadster that you're working on!!

Keep up the GREAT work, my friend!!

Later,

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I shot some color on the Highboy yesterday. It’s a deep metallic maroon from Duplicolor called Dark Toreador Red. These dark colors are really hard to photograph! The whole thing looks like a dark pool with no detail. It definitely needs contrasting upholstery, chrome suspension bits and windshield frame and a proper dash.

Thanx for lookin’.

(Click on picture for larger image)

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Edited by gbk1

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Looking good, Bernard!!

What color interior are you going to use?

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Good looking build so far! I had read your review on this kit a while back and now seeing it mocked together with some paint it really looks good. I've offered up an AMT '29 body to the Revell '32 frame and to make it fit would take a lot of re-work. Hell, the AMT body doesn't fit any of the AMT '32 frames either. For someone wanting to build a '29 on Deuce rails this is definately the way to go.

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Very cool! How's GBK? Long time, no hear from you.

Hi Don. I sent you a PM here on the board a coupla weeks back because your e-mail no longer works. PM me with your current e-mail if you can.

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Beautiful build, Bernard! Sure looks period perfect so far. Great color choice, too. Looking forward to seeing this one done.

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Tim Boyd had an excellent how-to article in SAE back around 1999-2000 about kit bashing the Revell 32 frame with the AMT 29 roadster body. I'll look up the issue & post it later.

:lol:

Now that's info I would love to see. I've probably got about a half dozen variants on the '29 roadster/'32 frame combo I have planned. I've figured out possible approaches to this adaption buit Tim's methods are usually so simple and direct I would love to see what he has to offer.

Edited by gbk1

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I've got that issue as well..I refer to it regularly.....and his methods work quite well, since i've done the same mods to a 32 frame i'm throwing under an A if you guys need me to scan I can try to get that done over the weekend..

Oh and Bernard..great job so far, I love the color esp. on this one. Give me inspiration to wanna work on my 29 on 32 rails..(turbo inline 4, artillery wheels, ala kart seats, and a track style nose and belly pan..painted pearl white)

Gray

Edited by stryfe101

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... my 29 on 32 rails..(turbo inline 4, artillery wheels, ala kart seats, and a track style nose and belly pan..painted pearl white)

Gray

Thanx Gray. You build sounds very cool! Get to workin' on it! :lol:

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Tim Boyd had an excellent how-to article in SAE back around 1999-2000 about kit bashing the Revell 32 frame with the AMT 29 roadster body. I'll look up the issue & post it later.

;)

There have been 'issues' with the fitting of that body with the Revell frame, all right. Just like the 1:1 scale! (I'm talking about real steel bodies on Gennie '32 rails, or 'Just-A-Hobby' rails or the nice examples from American Stamping.

There are different issues with fiberglass bodies, some simple and some in the "Why-did-I-spend-money-on-this-$@#! fiberglass body???" department.

The frame can be flattened on top, (tedius, even with my frame jig) or a pair of wood slats can be fashioned to fit the curve of the frame, and the flat subframe of the body. Then, the frame gets 'pinched' at the firewall, to fit the cowl's narrowness. The rear 'kick' of the frame is next, with a slight curve-in to clear part of the subframe, and get inside the wheel wells.

On the model, the same things are apparent. But the fit is critical, if you want a highboy that looks like it was planned that way...otherwise, you will have to live with a bad fit between body & frame, usually compromised by poor engine fit, wheelbase too long, (or too short, if using the AMT Vicky frame) and a hood that looks too long. Trial fitting is paramount, as you will see when setting everything up.

The thing I liked most was the fidelity to scale. Revell '32 frame is close, AMT '29 Roadster body is also right in there. Windshield has to be worked, but is close enough to be leaned back and 'adjusted'.

The Ala Kart interior is O.K. if you like that 'moderne' look, but the Monogram '32 Roadster seat with headrest was so authentic I had to go that way. (a lot of cutting and gluing, but worth the effort)

A flathead car, it had to have the rightstuff. Now back to our program...

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There have been 'issues' with the fitting of that body with the Revell frame, all right. Just like the 1:1 scale! ...

On the model, the same things are apparent. But the fit is critical, if you want a highboy that looks like it was planned that way...otherwise, you will have to live with a bad fit between body & frame, usually compromised by poor engine fit, wheelbase too long, (or too short, if using the AMT Vicky frame) and a hood that looks too long. Trial fitting is paramount, as you will see when setting everything up.

The thing I liked most was the fidelity to scale. Revell '32 frame is close, AMT '29 Roadster body is also right in there. Windshield has to be worked, but is close enough to be leaned back and 'adjusted'. ...

Hey Mike, this is a perfect summary of the issues for this adaptation. I recommend anyone re-read this post carefully. Besides being a virtual recipe for tackling the job, it will give you a great appreciation for the superb work that has been done by Replicas & Minatures of Maryland on their kit.

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Hi Don. I sent you a PM here on the board a coupla weeks back because your e-mail no longer works. PM me with your current e-mail if you can.

Try mrknowetall@aol.com. That always works.

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Looking at my post of November 14th I can only laugh. I had such plans for a quick finish to this build! Right after I wrote that I clear coated everything and then popped it all in the dehydrator I has been given for my birthday. Well, those beautifully cast thin resin frame rails that I got from RMCM promptly warped. And I noticed a flaw in the paint on the hood as well.

I must say that Norm Veber at RMCM gives awesome customer service. I told him of my plight and he rushed out a replacement frame with an order I had pending.

In the meantime I started on a ’32 Highboy which I’m putting up on another post.

So here I am a month later with the motor to still do (twin carb pre-’49 flatty), AllClad to shoot on the scratch built wishbones, exhaust system to build, and all the exterior details to complete. Well, maybe in another week or so....

Thanx for lookin’

(Click on picture for larger image)

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Edited by gbk1

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The interior details are looking GREAT!!

I really like the color combination, too!!

I can't wait to see this one in person at the NNL West!!

Later,

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That's one cool lookin ride, Bernard.

Do you know if, 'back in the day', did anyone ever chop that windshield? Didn't them guys have their hair all slicked back, back then? :D They wouldn't have needed such a high windshield. :D

I'd probably chop it, but I'd drive it as is, given the chance B) .

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That's one cool lookin ride, Bernard.

Do you know if, 'back in the day', did anyone ever chop that windshield? ...

I'd probably chop it, but I'd drive it as is, given the chance :unsure: .

That's a build for another day. Back in the day taking 2" out of the windshield was fairly common, especially on channeled rods for that low look. But I'm going for a fairly staid late 40's bling-free look - hence the twin carbs, maroon paint, lack of trim rings on the steelies (vs. the '32 I'm building) and simple interior with the column shift. I'm trying to stay pretty close to the basic RMCM transkit in spirit. BTW, the windshield is probably sitting a bit upright in the pics - it's a mock up held together with rubber cement and the 'shield kept leaning forward whenever I moved the car around.

Edited by gbk1

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That's a build for another day. Back in the day taking 2" out of the windshield was fairly common, especially on channeled rods for that low look. But I'm going for a fairly staid late 40's bling-free look - hence the twin carbs, maroon paint, lack of trim rings on the steelies (vs. the '32 I'm building) and simple interior with the column shift. I'm trying to stay pretty close to the basic RMCM transkit in spirit. BTW, the windshield is probably sitting a bit upright in the pics - it's a mock up held together with rubber cement and the 'shield kept leaning forward whenever I moved the car around.

It seems like all of the builds I've seen of the '29 roadster the windshield has been installed straight up and down. Even the "box art" model on the kit I have is done this way and it's like instant death despite how nice or how cool the rest of the car is. I'm glad to see you're "in the know" and will be installing it correctly. The build is looking good so far and pretty accurately reflects what the majority of these cars were like as most were built without a lot of "frills" and the same basic recipe, to which you've gone right down the checklist. It was called get a car and get it on the road.

Question: You say the resin kit requires the builder to use the rear axle/suspension found in the Revell model A kits. What did you do about the model A torque tube being significantly shorter than a '32 when using an early engine / 3spd-style trans?

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Question: You say the resin kit requires the builder to use the rear axle/suspension found in the Revell model A kits. What did you do about the model A torque tube being significantly shorter than a '32 when using an early engine / 3spd-style trans?

First of all, the RMCM transkit comes set up to take the the stock Revellogram airbag rear suspension (yech!) and control arms. The '29 suspension setup I refer to is for the Rik Hoving mastered "traditional" frame I'm using on my blue '32.

But in this case I have adapted an AMT Model-A rear cross member and I am indeed using the Revellogram '29 rear suspension. The Revellogram drive shaft is plenty long so their is no problem. In fact, I am using a La Salle tranny which is quite short and finishes up in front of the k-member. I took the semi-circular yoke that faces rearward on the stock Revellogram setup and reversed is so it is on the other side of the k-member to support the end of the tranny. The real problem is with the control arms in the stock setup. In order to get a decent stance they come right up against the frame rails. That's the way it's sitting in the most recent pictures. I have since decided to use split arms running parallel with the frame to eliminate this problem and to achieve a slightly lower rear stance. Kit-bashing is not not without its collateral damage.

Edited by gbk1

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First of all, the RMCM transkit comes set up to take the the stock Revellogram airbag rear suspension (yech!) and control arms. The '29 suspension setup I refer to is for the Rik Hoving mastered "traditional" frame I'm using on my blue '32.

But in this case I have adapted an AMT Model-A rear cross member and I am indeed using the Revellogram '29 rear suspension. The Revellogram drive shaft is plenty long so their is no problem. In fact, I am using a La Salle tranny which is quite short and finishes up in front of the k-member. I took the semi-circular yoke that faces rearward on the stock Revellogram setup and reversed is so it is on the other side of the k-member to support the end of the tranny. The real problem is with the control arms in the stock setup. In order to get a decent stance they come right up against the frame rails. That's the way it's sitting in the most recent pictures. I have since decided to use split arms running parallel with the frame to eliminate this problem and to achieve a slightly lower rear stance. Kit-bashing is not not without its collateral damage.

Okay, see I read the post on your '32 roadster right before this and my brain got the two cars washed together. In mocking up different early Ford rear axles in the Revell '32 frame I've noticed the same problem of the radius rods hitting the frame in some cases. The other option would be to relieve the frame but that's kinda hokey. If you're going for accuracy, when splitting rear wishbones the forward pivot point needs to be on the same plane and centerline as the front driveshaft pivot to avoid binding during suspension travel.

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If you're going for accuracy, when splitting rear wishbones the forward pivot point needs to be on the same plane and centerline as the front driveshaft pivot to avoid binding during suspension travel.

Thanx for the tip, Dennis. Details, details, details...

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I usually build one car at a time but currently I’m building this ’29 A-V8 and a ’32 Ford, both of them highboy roadster in a very traditional vein. The past week has been spent bouncing back and forth between them as the mood hits me. In the case of the ’29 I adjusted the rear suspension, where the radius rods had been interfering with the frame rails, causing the rear end to sit higher than I would like as well as being rather mechanically unsound. Now I’ll be going with a split wishbone setup notably improving the stance. In addition, in the prior pictures I showed the windshield wasn’t at the proper angle. Here a side view with the changes – I think it looks much better now.

(click on picture for larger image)

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I also started building motors for both projects.. The ’29 is being built as an immediate postwar rod, circa 1949 or so. The ’32 is about placed about 3 years later and more and is more of a showboat. So the motor for the ’29 features a pre-’49 flathead out of the AMT ’34 Ford 5-window coupe kit, finished in Ford Engine Green. The mill has a twin carb manifold in contrast to the ’32’s tri-carb rig. The crabs are the incredible Model Car Garage pieces with their amazing detail. The exhaust manifolds are from the Revell ’32 Sedan flathead, chosen for their utilitarian look. I removed the kit transmission which is kind of a featureless blob and installed a La Salle transmission in its place. Other than that the only other modification to the kit motor other than dechroming all the parts is the installation of a Harmon-Collins “crab†magneto on the front. The “crab†part, the black bakelite distributor cover out of which the spark plug wires emerge hasn’t been installed yet. I plan on detailing the motor this week.

(click on picture for larger image)

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Thanx for lookin’.

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I really like the color combination on this one!!

The burgundy with the red and tan is really nice!!

Thanks for sharing!!

Later,

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