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AMT 23T roadster Offy powered


alan barton
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This one is a case of tail wagging the dog - i had wanted to build an Offy powered rod as soon as the Revell midget kits came out and finally decided a full fendered early T would be just the wheelbarrow to carry it around.

The Kit is the AMT 23 Ford T.  This kit came out as a street rod only unlike the multi-optioned 25 T .  My example is a first issue and was moulded in the infamous milk bottle plastic.  This plastic accepted paint and glue just fine so there is no need to be fearful of it - it is simply a part of modelling history.

While the parts look in many ways identical to the AMT 25 T. there are slight detail and dimensional differences through out although put two built-ups side by side and you would be struggling to tell the difference.

Up front, I would say the 25 is the better kit - you get way more optional parts and you don't have to deal with a multi -piece frame and a multi-piece fender unit.  My example was compounded by having very warped frame rails which for some inexplicable reason I decided to deal with rather than swap out. for something straighter.

On top of that, I fist started building this in the early eighties and it was one of my first ever Testors spray can paint jobs.  What a mess - I had no idea and it ran and bubbled and pooled all over the place.  It was also my second effort at paint stripping ( funny that) and it didn't work that well either so I put it away for nearly forty years .before dragging it out during the COVID lockdown.

Here's what I started with. I tried the sun, hot water and even gentle violence to straighten the frame rails but in the ned used my home made magnetic frame jig to clamp it in the correct alignment, glue it altogether and then leave it all in the sun for about a week to "normalise" it. It's still holding together so I wil call that a fix!

Cheers

Alan

 

 

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The frame uses the chromed drop front axle from the kit with a chromed banjo rear axle from the Ala Kart with the airbag mounts removed and the radius rods shortened to attach to scratchbuilt brackets.  I wasn't sure what I would do with the rear spring at this stage so I left it out - with their flat crowned fenders, Model Ts can be tricky to nail the stance so I put this challenge off til later.

I sawed the in-out box off the Offy and replaced it with an aluminium cased four speed from an unknown MPC kit -I'm guessing MPC because of the shade of red plastic..  I made up mounting plates, race-car style, for the front and rear of the engine.  As usual, filed as much away as possible from the front crossmember in an attempt to get it out of the clouds.

I am trying two wheel styles - AMT 40 Ford rims with stock caps as well as Monogram wires, the rears form the Pie Wagon, the fronts from the yellow version  32 roadster. All painted in Testor's light ivory.

The front hairpin style radius rods are from the MPC Switchers 32 kit.  They really are awful but are not objectionable  on this full fendered build.  I have a small stash of good hairpins and would rather use them on open wheeled cars where they can be appreciated.

 

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Here's a mockup shot of the Offy sitting in the T. Unfortunately, the gap between the fenders and the frame rails is how the kit was made.  There is absolutely no positive location for the front fenders on the frame and the gluing surface is minimal at best.  In the interests of a clean build, I opted to leave them just as you see here. With an engine in place, you simply can't see the gap from any angle.

As a race engine doesn't have conventional engine mounts, I made two engine plates.  I used a short bit of Evergreen tube for a mount to centre the rear of the engine - it worked well! The front mount took two goes and I found drilling a pair of countersunk holes reduced the bulk and added some detail.

Cheers

Alan

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The 25 T comes with the square pleated interior which is more hot roddy but I chose to install the seat from the the 23  T kit as provided.  I sprayed it Testors' Light Ivory with Dullcote to take off the shine.

I used a copper toned embossing powder for the carpet  plus the dashboard form the 1925 T kit.  the steering wheel is the small diameter banjo wheel from the Revell Model A hiboy kit. It is a nice size for the tight confines of a Model T.

I used a tip form Chris at HPI Guy's YouTube channel. The detail on the gauges was highlighted with a white pencil.  I am stunned at how simple this is and how come I never stumbled on it before!  Thanks, Chris, much appreciated!

Cheers

Alan

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Edited by alan barton
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Thanks Gary.  It is such a neat motor - I can see an Offy powered A of some sort in my future also!

I would love to have used the Offy headers from the kit but they were never going to clear the body so I opted to construct a new set from thick styrene and aluminium wire.  As you can see, it took a few shots but I got there eventually.  Why are the header flanges so thick, I hear you ask?  Because the mounting area on the Offy block is very three dimensional and I needed plenty of material to file down to make it a nice fit on final assembly.

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Edited by alan barton
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Here are two Model T radiators.  The one with the large hole and the fin detail on the rear surface is the '25 T and the one with the small crank hole and no inner detail to speak of is the '23 T.  I tried both but settled on using the '23 unit. You can see that the '25 unit also has some prominent ejector in marks that I only noticed after paint - where are my glasses again?

Before installing it, I first filed down an AMT '29 roadster radiator until it fitted comfortably inside the T shell, but forgot to take a photo. 

Again, there is no mounting pins or mounts to speak of - you are simply going to glue the bottom of the grill shell directly to the front of the crossmember.  I removed paint from both surfaces before gluing the radiator onto the car, then spent quite a bit of time tweaking it until it sat square and perpendicular - this is why I love Testor's glue in the orange tube so much - it has much better workability and stickum than other glues that I use.

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Edited by alan barton
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