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You be a weathering genius, my friend!

🌵😎

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A couple of suggestions for the wear that would take place on the running boards and floor boards.  Tamiya makes some great weathering powders including a metallic one that if wiped sparingly along the corners of the running board would indicate the paint has worn off where the driver would step.  Maybe a little at the  corner of the seat base where his shoe would scrape against it.  Similar wear on the brake and clutch pedals and on the floor directly under them.

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8 hours ago, Danno said:

You be a weathering genius, my friend!

🌵😎

Thank you, kind sir! I'm working at it! 😄

20 minutes ago, Chariots of Fire said:

A couple of suggestions for the wear that would take place on the running boards and floor boards.  Tamiya makes some great weathering powders including a metallic one that if wiped sparingly along the corners of the running board would indicate the paint has worn off where the driver would step.  Maybe a little at the  corner of the seat base where his shoe would scrape against it.  Similar wear on the brake and clutch pedals and on the floor directly under them.

Thanks, Charles. That's all good advice, and I will heed it. I would rather you suggest adding weathering, than letting me know I did too much. I appreciate it!

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WOW, great detailing, the base of the seat looks real, did you ask elves to do the wear work on this one?  It really looks like the passage of time! 👌

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Daniel, Thank you very much for your detailed explanation, I really appreciate it. And honestly, from step to step the Mack looks better and better. Your weathering skills are amazing. And the proposals from Charles will certainly add to the look. Please tell me what are the small levers under front of the seat for? They don't seem to come from the kit, do they? I'm really excited to see this thing finished. Juergen

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4 hours ago, HJK said:

Daniel, Thank you very much for your detailed explanation, I really appreciate it. And honestly, from step to step the Mack looks better and better. Your weathering skills are amazing. And the proposals from Charles will certainly add to the look. Please tell me what are the small levers under front of the seat for? They don't seem to come from the kit, do they? I'm really excited to see this thing finished. Juergen

Those are the levers that engage the PTO, and pump, for the dump mechanism. They are from this kit, which is the dump truck. Thank you so much for your kind words!

 

5 hours ago, AmericanMuscleFan said:

WOW, great detailing, the base of the seat looks real, did you ask elves to do the wear work on this one?  It really looks like the passage of time! 👌

Thank you, Francis! You figured my system out! It's elves!

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Hi Daniel, OK, I see. I also have one of the Monogram kits. It's the Texaco Tank Truck. This one doesn't come with these levers. That's the reason I asked the question. Another thing is also puzzling me. On one of the pictures at the beginning of your thread one can see six rivet heads nearly in the middle of the frame rails. There is nothing in between the rails, no cross member or similar parts, so I'm asking myself what are they for? Do you have any idea what they are for? Is there a special reason for them? Are they needed for the Log Hauler Kit and they just use the same frame for all the kits? BTW, I thought about your solution of routing the ignition cables. That's a very clever method, thanks again for sharing your idea. Juergen

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19 hours ago, HJK said:

Hi Daniel, OK, I see. I also have one of the Monogram kits. It's the Texaco Tank Truck. This one doesn't come with these levers. That's the reason I asked the question. Another thing is also puzzling me. On one of the pictures at the beginning of your thread one can see six rivet heads nearly in the middle of the frame rails. There is nothing in between the rails, no cross member or similar parts, so I'm asking myself what are they for? Do you have any idea what they are for? Is there a special reason for them? Are they needed for the Log Hauler Kit and they just use the same frame for all the kits? BTW, I thought about your solution of routing the ignition cables. That's a very clever method, thanks again for sharing your idea. Juergen

Juergen, I will have to look at it, when I get home. The rivets may be for the hydraulic cylinders. 

I have decided to leave off the box sides and tailgate, and install stake pockets on the sides of the bed. I drove lumber trucks, for many years.  I have long wanted to build one. Since they all had dump mechanisms, I am finally going to build one, using this truck. There may not have been many set up this way, in the late '20s-early '30s, but, the technology was there, and trucks have been infinitely customized,  so, I am going with it! Thank you again!

6 hours ago, DRIPTROIT 71 said:

Looking good!

Thanks, kindly,  sir!

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On 3/2/2021 at 7:18 AM, HJK said:

On one of the pictures at the beginning of your thread one can see six rivet heads nearly in the middle of the frame rails. There is nothing in between the rails, no cross member or similar parts, so I'm asking myself what are they for? Do you have any idea what they are for? Is there a special reason for them?

Juergen, I have to say that I am as clueless as you, regarding what those might be! ☺️ There is absolutely nothing near them. Hmmm...

The cab parts have been painted, and are sitting on the fender/chassis assembly while they dry enough so that I can weather them. The lights and the  flash are washing out a lot of the weathering--especially in the places I've used an 8B pencil to represent worn through paint, through use. I think it'll look good as a lumber truck.Anyway, here are the latest photos. As always, questions, critiques and comments are always welcome. Thanks for looking!

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Just seeing this now Great stuff enjoying learning thru your posts . 1 question for you I remember building this a few years ago and I’m not sure what I did wrong  but the cab did not sit right at all ? Any ideas what I may have done wrong ? Again this s looking great .rob 

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Weather the sides of the cab where they would have been scrubbed by dirty shoes getting in.  Also along the beginning of the curved part of the cab where it would get touched by hands.  Some of the Tamiya bare metal weathering material put on with their little sponge tip would do the trick.

To Robert;  I think is is a matter of test fitting these pieces as you go and making sure that all is square.  The least bit of raw plastic where the sprues attach can be the cause of a lot of grief if they are not sanding off well.  Just a thought.  I've done a couple of these and the fit can be tough, especially with the hood so it takes a bit of tweaking.

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Thanks, Charles. I haven't even started on the cab, other than the base paint. I got sidetracked,  building the bed.  I shouldn't need more than a couple of hours,  once I get a chance to sit down with it, again. Then, I will begin to assemble and weather the cab!

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It's impressive to see innovation from the very beginning of the industry before it got to today's trucks, but these old workhorses remain pieces of art!

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Lookin' great. Love your weathering. I built the dump truck last year, after keeping it in the stash for 30 years.

Mark

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On 3/3/2021 at 12:37 PM, Jasper018 said:

Just seeing this now Great stuff enjoying learning thru your posts . 1 question for you I remember building this a few years ago and I’m not sure what I did wrong  but the cab did not sit right at all ? Any ideas what I may have done wrong ? Again this s looking great .rob 

Thank you, Robert. I am hoping everything fits. I have tried to fit stuff, as I go, but, who knows, once paint is applied. It only takes a couple of thousandths to throw everything off! Thanks again for your kind words.

On 3/10/2021 at 8:47 PM, DRIPTROIT 71 said:

Looks great!

Thank you, Brian!

On 3/11/2021 at 2:03 PM, AmericanMuscleFan said:

It's impressive to see innovation from the very beginning of the industry before it got to today's trucks, but these old workhorses remain pieces of art!

They are very cool, Francis! Thanks for looking in, my friend!

23 hours ago, the goon said:

Lookin' great. Love your weathering. I built the dump truck last year, after keeping it in the stash for 30 years.

Mark

I appreciate that, Mark! This is the dump truck, as well. I built the stake truck when that kit was new, back  in '75 or '76. That one's long gone!

Here's the bed/headboard assembly, so far. Sorry for the poor quality photos. The stake pockets are made from Evergreen square tube, split lengthwise, then cut to length. I will likely trim the sides of the headboard, back to the uprights. Well...there's still a pretty fair amount of work to do! ☺️ Thanks, everyone for your comments!

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On 3/10/2021 at 10:34 AM, Chariots of Fire said:

Weather the sides of the cab where they would have been scrubbed by dirty shoes getting in.  Also along the beginning of the curved part of the cab where it would get touched by hands.  Some of the Tamiya bare metal weathering material put on with their little sponge tip would do the trick.

To Robert;  I think is is a matter of test fitting these pieces as you go and making sure that all is square.  The least bit of raw plastic where the sprues attach can be the cause of a lot of grief if they are not sanding off well.  Just a thought.  I've done a couple of these and the fit can be tough, especially with the hood so it takes a bit of tweaking.

Ok great thanks for the info  the next go around I will be taking my time 

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The wood bed cushions/hinge pieces were warped, from the box, so I replaced them with pieces made from plastic, for the hinges, and wood strips, for the cushions. The hinges aren't prototypical, but, they look better than the kit parts. I also messed around with the fit of the cab pieces, firewall and radiator. They fit together nicely, with some work. It will take a bit more work to get them to fit together snugly, AND on the chassis. I've seen enough work of guys who know how to do this (Charles Rowley, Joe Cavorley, to name just a couple) to know that it can be done, however. Of course, the new pieces in these photos still  need weathering. I've had the bed mounted as it will be, permanently, so that's figured. Anyway, here are just a couple of shots of the latest work. Comments, questions and critiques are always welcome. Thanks for looking!

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Daniel:  To be in the same category as Joe Cavorley is an honor.  I've learned that working with kit pieces sometimes requires some shaving and sanding to get the fit right.  The assumption that they should go together without any hitches just is not so.  These kits have been around for a while as well and are based on molds that were probably made long before CNC machines and the intricate detailing of today.  Trial and error fitting with small adjustments at a time are the way to cure the bad fit.  JMHO!😎

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Great work Daniel, this is called a bad for a good, and your hinges are undoubtedly much more realistic than those of the kit.

As for the fit, that's part of the fun of this hobby and it brings out the best in us, anyway overcoming a problem like this can only make us better especially when we like unconventional subjects... 

I'm not worried about your skills by the way! 😉

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Top shelf skills on display here. Real World weathering is nice to see for a change. Thanks for sharing your skills with us.

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On 3/15/2021 at 9:55 PM, Chariots of Fire said:

Daniel:  To be in the same category as Joe Cavorley is an honor.  I've learned that working with kit pieces sometimes requires some shaving and sanding to get the fit right.  The assumption that they should go together without any hitches just is not so.  These kits have been around for a while as well and are based on molds that were probably made long before CNC machines and the intricate detailing of today.  Trial and error fitting with small adjustments at a time are the way to cure the bad fit.  JMHO!😎

As far as I am concerned, you've earned the comparison. I have to say--the fit of this thing, given its age, is excellent. Part of getting the cab to fit properly is understanding just how it fits together. The instructions are a bit vague. Fiddling around with it and studying it definitely helped!

On 3/16/2021 at 6:38 PM, AmericanMuscleFan said:

Great work Daniel, this is called a bad for a good, and your hinges are undoubtedly much more realistic than those of the kit.

As for the fit, that's part of the fun of this hobby and it brings out the best in us, anyway overcoming a problem like this can only make us better especially when we like unconventional subjects... 

I'm not worried about your skills by the way! 😉

Thank you, Francis. The hinges are definitely better than the little plastic donuts that were molded to the wooden cushions! You're so right about these challenges--they are a part of what makes this hobby  so much fun--and rewarding! Like you, I'm in constant pursuit of improvement!

On 3/16/2021 at 7:18 PM, misterNNL said:

Top shelf skills on display here. Real World weathering is nice to see for a change. Thanks for sharing your skills with us.

Thank you, Tom! Thank you for looking, and for your comments. This has been something of a learning experience!

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It took some "figgerin'" to build the bed hoist assembly! The hydraulic cylinders needed to be assembled, so that the seams could be removed,  prior to paint. However, the pistons/rods need to be installed prior to cementing the cylinder halves together. I will have to illustrate it, one of these days, since I got caught up in designing and building it, that I neglected to take in-process photos! Sorry! Anyway...here's what I ended up with. The pieces in white are swaged onto the cylinders. They are carriers for the cylinder assembly that allowed me to turn the assembly in to the chassis rails, then slide it into position. Obviously, all of this needs paint,  weathering, detail paint, etc. Now, though, I know it will all work, together with the bed. As always, questions, comments and critiques are welcome. Thanks for looking!...Dan

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This just continues to get better with each update. You have so much great work going here that it's difficult to find something specific to comment on. The overall effect is amazing.

David G.

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