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A question Daniel.  Does the hydraulic cylinder arrangement pivot on its axis?  It needs to in order for the pistons to move along with the body when it is raised.  The Mack AP that I did a few years back has the same equipment.  Nice job!

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19 hours ago, David G. said:

This just continues to get better with each update. You have so much great work going here that it's difficult to find something specific to comment on. The overall effect is amazing.

David G.

Thank you, David. I really appreciate that! It's been a learning experience, for sure!...Dan

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17 hours ago, Chariots of Fire said:

A question Daniel.  Does the hydraulic cylinder arrangement pivot on its axis?  It needs to in order for the pistons to move along with the body when it is raised.  The Mack AP that I did a few years back has the same equipment.  Nice job!

It does, indeed! The carriers/pivots will mount rigidly to the chassis, while the cylinders will swing between them. It's funny, to me, the way the kit's designed. The pivots for the cylinders, and the hinges for the bed are molded to the wooden cushion strip. I couldn't leave it, that way, even though I had planned to keep this project simpler. Thank you for the  kind words and encouragement,  Charles!

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On 3/23/2021 at 8:03 AM, Chariots of Fire said:

A question Daniel.  Does the hydraulic cylinder arrangement pivot on its axis?  It needs to in order for the pistons to move along with the body when it is raised.  The Mack AP that I did a few years back has the same equipment.  Nice job!

Charles, I finally installed the mechanisms for the dump bed, today. I removed the solid area that was molded in the center of the chain that drives the pump. It was solid, like a chainsaw blade. I think it looks better, this way, although I couldn't find reference to illustrate how it should be. I still want to do some detail paint, and add appropriate grease and oil stains. I've been using a 6B drawing pencil to highlight some of the edges, and to replicate worn-through paint. I'm pretty happy with it, so far! I am planning to do final detail painting and weathering on the chassis, next, before moving on to the cab. As always, questions, comments and critiques are welcome! Thanks for having a look!

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There is a lot of ingenuity in this mechanism, the engineers of the time were very ''ingenious'' not to make a pun...   The more I look at it, the more I like your ''well-worn'' finish, it really looks like oxidized steel.  Do you have any idea of the weight limit that such a system could lift, I'm curious?

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6 hours ago, AmericanMuscleFan said:

There is a lot of ingenuity in this mechanism, the engineers of the time were very ''ingenious'' not to make a pun...   The more I look at it, the more I like your ''well-worn'' finish, it really looks like oxidized steel.  Do you have any idea of the weight limit that such a system could lift, I'm curious?

I agree, Francis--those guys were the computer developers of their day. Thanks for your remarks regarding the finish. I feel like I captured the look, pretty well. As far as lifting capacity, I'm not sure, but, at least a few thousand pounds, I'd think? I got a couple of pics with the bed raised. It ought to work! I'm almost ready to paint the bed. Then, I can mount it, permanently.

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6 hours ago, AmericanMuscleFan said:

There is a lot of ingenuity in this mechanism, the engineers of the time were very ''ingenious'' not to make a pun...   The more I look at it, the more I like your ''well-worn'' finish, it really looks like oxidized steel.  Do you have any idea of the weight limit that such a system could lift, I'm curious?

I agree, Francis--those guys were the computer developers of their day. Thanks for your remarks regarding the finish. I feel like I captured the look, pretty well. As far as lifting capacity, I'm not sure, but, at least a few thousand pounds, I'd think? I got a couple of pics with the bed raised. It ought to work! I'm almost ready to paint the bed. Then, I can mount it, permanently.

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Now I see how you did your raising mechanism.  Here's a look at how Mack did the similar thing for their AP's that were used in the construction of Boulder Dam.  I don't know exactly what the lifting capacity of the system was but these were 12 cubic yard dump bodies.   Rock fill weighs about 140 lb/cubic foot and there are 27 cubic feet to a cubic yard so when we tally it all up the weight of the payload alone is about 45,360 lb. or about 22.7 tons.  And that does not include the body weight.  Later versions had bodies made of aluminum which cut down the overall weight that has to be raised.

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Edited by Chariots of Fire
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Man...this is some great stuff. The more I see you guys doing such knockout work on old trucks, the more I'm getting interested in building some.

Most inspirational.

And isn't it amazing how real wood looks just like real wood?

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3 hours ago, Ace-Garageguy said:

And isn't it amazing how real wood looks just like real wood?

It would, wouldn't it?  

 

Sorry. 

 

But, yes, I certainly agree with you, Bill. Both these guys are knocking their Macks out of the park!

🌵😎

 

 

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17 hours ago, Chariots of Fire said:

Now I see how you did your raising mechanism.  Here's a look at how Mack did the similar thing for their AP's that were used in the construction of Boulder Dam.  I don't know exactly what the lifting capacity of the system was but these were 12 cubic yard dump bodies.   Rock fill weighs about 140 lb/cubic foot and there are 27 cubic feet to a cubic yard so when we tally it all up the weight of the payload alone is about 45,360 lb. or about 22.7 tons.  And that does not include the body weight.  Later versions had bodies made of aluminum which cut down the overall weight that has to be raised.

 

I was looking at this a while back. It's amazing, beautiful work, Charles! When I started this project, one of my goals was to keep it as simple as adding plug wires, and making the steering poseable. I have already exceeded my intended modifications! 🙂 That's not really a surprise! While I didn't want to go nuts, with it, I couldn't live with the hinges and hydraulic cylinders attached to the wooden cushion strips. I really appreciate your commentary and interest in this!

16 hours ago, Ace-Garageguy said:

Man...this is some great stuff. The more I see you guys doing such knockout work on old trucks, the more I'm getting interested in building some.

Most inspirational.

And isn't it amazing how real wood looks just like real wood?

Thanks, Bill. Mine is nothing like the work Charles did with his Mack! That thing is gorgeous!

It's funny how that works, with real wood, no? Thanks for your comments, sir!

12 hours ago, Danno said:

It would, wouldn't it?  

 

Sorry. 

 

But, yes, I certainly agree with you, Bill. Both these guys are knocking their Macks out of the park!

🌵😎

 

 

Thanks, Danno! I'm just about to start painting the bed...

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18 hours ago, Danno said:

It would, wouldn't it?  

 

Sorry. 

 

But, yes, I certainly agree with you, Bill. Both these guys are knocking their Macks out of the park!

🌵😎

 

 

I went to a show a few years back with my '37 Seagrave tractor drawn aerial.  Before the show actually got underway I was putting things out on the table and two guys came up to me and said "boy those ladders look just like real wood".  I said "Yes, I guess they do!  That's because they are real wood"1  😆🌲

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On 3/29/2021 at 8:27 AM, Chariots of Fire said:

"Yes, I guess they do!  That's because they are real wood"

That's great! Not only do they look better, that way, but, it's a lot more fun to build from scratch, than to just clean up and paint kit parts, anyway!

The bed has been painted and mounted, and the cab is assembled. I just mounted the radiator, earlier this morning. No photos, yet. It should be finished in the next couple of weeks!

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On 4/5/2021 at 5:16 PM, Dutzie said:

Great detail. 

 

On 4/6/2021 at 7:54 PM, DRIPTROIT 71 said:

Some Amazing work going on here! I can’t wait to see more!

Thank you, Brians! Thanks, Carl. I appreciate it! Here's the latest. The bed is painted and installed. The cab is coming together, as I clean up the parts and paint them (including preliminary weathering). I am satisfied with the fit. It's in great shape for a kit that's nearly 50 years old. The instructions would have you install the hydraulic oil tank to the top of the cylinders. Although I tried my damndest to keep the components exactly where they aligned on the original parts, the tank rode too tall, in that location, so I moved it to the crossmember in front of the hoist. Once everything is painted and assembled, I will go back through it, and apply final weathering, overall. I'm thinking that will really tie the finish together. I need some fairly heavy weathering beneath the door opening, since I figure that area gets a workout from boot toes, as the driver enters the cab. I will likely build a support, to prop the bed up,like the real ones have, for maintenance. It's probably anachronistic, but, it's superior to, and much less obtrusive using a stick!😃 As always, questions, comments and critiques are welcome. Thanks for looking!

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10 hours ago, Straightliner59 said:

I am satisfied with the fit. It's in great shape for a kit that's nearly 50 years old.

I don't think the age of the kit is a deal breaker for this wonderful truck!  You've seen it all and your great modeling talent makes all the difference!  I'm still in awe of your frame paint job, I have a lot to learn about it... 👌

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20 hours ago, Chariots of Fire said:

This has been a great project to follow.  Lots of interesting detailing all the way along.  Is the cab roof going to remain dark faded paint?  Any plans for a canvas overlay?  Just wondering.  

Thank you, Charles, very much! I'm happy that you're enjoying it. I haven't made up my mind as far as the roof goes. I just discovered  that I completely missed two big ol' ejector pin marks on the inside of the roof! Oops! Going to have to fix that. I appreciate you following along!

14 hours ago, AmericanMuscleFan said:

I don't think the age of the kit is a deal breaker for this wonderful truck!  You've seen it all and your great modeling talent makes all the difference!  I'm still in awe of your frame paint job, I have a lot to learn about it... 👌

I'm not sure what I was thinking, when I said that! Copyright on the box is 1995. While that's 23 years into the mold's life, it's not like it was in constant use, so it's  not surprising that the molds were still good. Maybe I expected it to sprout a bunch of flash, and misaligned molds, right in the box, as it aged! 😄 You wouldn't believe  how many coats of Dullcote and other various clear coats are on this thing--I mean, I have no idea. Basically, though, I shaved/ground pastel chalks of various colors (mostly black, but also a couple of different browns, tans, etc) until it looked like the reddish-brown hue that was showing through on almost every truck I've driven. I shot the chassis with Krylon Semi-Flat Black, then, in about five minutes, I dabbed the pastel mixture into the paint with a somewhat stiff-bristled brush. Then, I blew off the excess, and shot it with a very light coat of Dullcote--just enough to seal the pastels. A few minutes after that, using the same brush, I brushed any excess away, and added more pastels in areas where necessary. I really appreciate your comments and ongoing encouragement, my friend!

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