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Brian Austin

Driver's view of delivering new cars (Popular Science article from 1957)

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Something unusual there? I see two Skyliners with the second color of the two-tone only on the roofs; usually you see the second color just on the upper body, with the lower body and roof matching:

392321691_57skylinertwo-tone-05.jpg.8569ef26a4a8f77e01ff55830fa72f39.jpg

1507160748_57skylinertwo-tone-06.jpg.f74113a9d3a7d16e1d8c0f9127306d13.jpg

1475335009_57skylinertwo-tone-07.jpg.81992389ed6fa6ab8b0f42715bb20a23.jpg

 

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Very interesting. Thanks for sharing it, Brian.

 

🌵😎

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One thing that caught my eye was the caption stating the driver has to unload the upper rack to clear low bridges.

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Posted (edited)

My father worked at a Ford dealership.  As a kid I would watch the drivers unload the cars from the haulers.  I wouldn't want to have to load or unload those upper decks!

 

Edited by afx

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For you younger folks, cars weren't always delivered like this. My Dad graduated high school in 1936 and started working for a Pontiac dealer in Granite City, IL. Him and another young man would take a train to Detroit and drive a new car back while towing a second car.

Thanks, Bob

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Really a neat piece of history here.  And thanks for the added note, Bob.  Hard to believe cars were transported two at a time like that.

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Prior to auto-rack rail cars, automobiles were shipped in special box cars, often four at a time.  There were special racks inside.  I'd love to build one in 1:24-1:25.  :-)

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Thanks for this insight of a period of auto transport history as seen from the driver's perspective.

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Vert-A-Pack were a big failure in practice - didn't last long. 

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Wonder if they wait to let the oil fill the pan back up before starting them up?

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The firm my dad worked for at that time (Pettibone) built that lifter on the right raising the doors - it was a bit more reliable than the Vega. Ironically it was better known as a junkyard mule:

61dodge.thumb.jpg.ee8734ba957481505398bc1ad1dbc38e.jpg

I bet it later hauled a Vega or two to the crusher...

 

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Interesting prospective of a slice of life in 1957. Something else that I noticed when information about the load of cars on the transporter being worth up to $20,000.00. That's not even the average price of a car today. The driver is proud, and should be for the time, that he earns $8,000.00 per year. That was some pretty good money in 1957. Anyone care to figure out what that would be in todays dollars ?  

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Posted (edited)

A couple handy-dandy online calculators say either $74,879.43 or $76,443.

However, the income tax rate on $8000+ in 1957 was 34% for a single person; head of household was 30%.

Edited by ChrisBcritter

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