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help with building frame


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hey everyone can anyone point me in direction for plaststuc or evergreen for the right size or close to it by providing me the the item number,,,i have tried to call both manufactures but no one answering, this would be for 60s thru 70s  1/24 or 1/25  cars ,i have done the conversion thing but i keep screwing up when i look at the manufatures sizes trying to get it right ,,this is probably something simple im over looking ,i also did a search on here but came up empty on item numbers that were used ,i seen plenty of sizes people use but no item number to go with the size they use ,,,,,,, im basically wanting to back halve some cars with out having to buy a model to use part, i already built one but the pieces i have are to big ,but it did turn out great , and i didnt have the package so the size of them is unknown ,,,,but BLAH_BLAH_BLAH_BLAH it looks good just out of scale

 

thanks bill

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This is a link to Evergreen’s website.   https://evergreenscalemodels.com/

This is Plastruct’s   https://www.plastruct.com/

Invest in a dial caliper (or digital) and measure the frame you have. Then you can go to the website and get the number of the closest match. I find Evergreens website much easier to navigate than Plastruct.

 

 

76AC2847-7172-4AD1-BA27-9A4963844450.jpeg

Edited by NOBLNG
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NOBLING has great advice, invest in an inexpensive caliper. Absolutely necessary for good scratchbuilding. My personal preference, both professionally and in my hobby work, is a dial caliper.

It would help to know what sizes you need in 1:1, but when working in 1:25 scale, the following Evergreen round stock will get you close;
- #211  measures .040", equals 1" in scale
- #221 measures 3/64" (.047"), equals just shy of 1.25" in scale
- #222 measures 1/16" (.062"), equals 1.5" in scale
- #212 measures .080", equals 2" in scale
- #213 measures .100", equals 2.5" in scale

There are other sizes both smaller and larger available, but these sizes should get you pretty close for most chassis work. If you look at the numbers above, you may notice a very handy conversion for working in 1/25 scale, and in most cases 1/24 scale as well. In 1/25 scale, 1" = .040". That makes the math easy; .020" = 1/2 inch, .060 + 1.5 inches, .080 = 2 inches, etc. Also, as has been pointed out on the forum in the past, 1 mm + .0397" (roughly). .0397" is only .0003" away from .040, a negligible amount in our hobby, so millimeters, for our intents and purposes, equals 1 inch in 1/25 scale. Very handy.

Edited by Bainford
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3 hours ago, bauercrew said:

hey everyone can anyone point me in direction for plaststuc or evergreen for the right size or close to it by providing me the the item number,,,i have tried to call both manufactures but no one answering, this would be for 60s thru 70s  1/24 or 1/25  cars ,i have done the conversion thing but i keep screwing up when i look at the manufatures sizes trying to get it right ,,this is probably something simple im over looking ,i also did a search on here but came up empty on item numbers that were used ,i seen plenty of sizes people use but no item number to go with the size they use ,,,,,,, im basically wanting to back halve some cars with out having to buy a model to use part, i already built one but the pieces i have are to big ,but it did turn out great , and i didnt have the package so the size of them is unknown ,,,,but BLAH_BLAH_BLAH_BLAH it looks good just out of scale

 

thanks bill

If you are working with rectangular frames, likely .080”x.156” or .100”x.156” would be close.  A measurement with a calliper would give you  the exact size. If it’s not available, you may have to get the next size up and file it down? For conversion.... scale size multiplied by 25 (or 24) equals full size. Full size divided by 25 (or 24) equals scale size needed.

2 hours ago, Bainford said:

NOBLING has great advice, invest in an inexpensive caliper. Absolutely necessary for good scratchbuilding. My personal preference, both professionally and in my hobby work, is a dial caliper.

I agree! Easy to read and no battery expense. A cheap harbour freight or princess auto one will suffice.

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If you are looking for rectangular tubing, say 2" x 3" in 1/25 scale, just do some math...it would work out to .08" x .12".  Then just select the styrene stock closest to the desired size.  If there is no exact match, go slightly undersize as the paint thickness will be out of scale.

As for calipers, I like digital, even the cheap ones can switch between inch and metric.  The calipers are indispensable, you will find all sorts of things to measure like scrap wire, tubing, and sheet plastic you round up from non-hobby sources.  The battery will last much longer if you take it out between uses.  I've had one for five or six years, still on the first battery.

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Not sure exactly which type of back-half frame you are constructing, but keep in mind the limits of bending either rectangular tube or solid styrene rod. You'll need to plan it out well, and have some means to anchor/pivot each bend, and you'll need to hold it in place until the styrene sets again.

Something like this Alston frame might be beyond the limits of what you can do with tubing or rod:

alstonbackhalf.jpg.554643cb3558551f9aca5e304fb9538f.jpg

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10 minutes ago, Casey said:

Not sure exactly which type of back-half frame you are constructing, but keep in mind the limits of bending either rectangular tube or solid styrene rod. You'll need to plan it out well, and have some means to anchor/pivot each bend, and you'll need to hold it in place until the styrene sets again.

Something like this Alston frame might be beyond the limits of what you can do with tubing or rod:

alstonbackhalf.jpg.554643cb3558551f9aca5e304fb9538f.jpg

For complicated shapes like like the example above, your best bet is to cut it from .060" or .080" sheet stock, depending on the size you need. For example, for 2x3 rectangular tubing, use .080" sheet. Glue two pieces of plastic together face to face with white glue, measure out and draw the shape on the plastic, then cut/file the two frame members simultaneously. Ensures both frame rails are identical, and often a lot easier then trying to bend two pieces of rectangular stock to the exact same shape.

Edited by Bainford
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