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Ford C-600 Series Truck Reference Pics & Info

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Here's a '57 I found in a salvage yard a few years back.

IMG_66671-vi_zps539357b9.jpg

The '57 is the only single-headlight version not to have the removable wiper actuator access panels- those were added when the C-Series switched back to single headlights for 1961. The door scripts were also unique to '57 models.

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Question-

I've noticed a few of these trucks (like the one Aaron posted to show the AC unit) have a small rectangular badge below the side reflector/model designation badge on the door? What is that for? It sort of looks like it says "Allison" in some of the pics I've seen, which I'd guess would identify an Allison automatic trans, but I'm not sure, as I've never seen one of these in person with that smaller rectangular emblem.

Yes, I'm quoting my own post, but the emblem I was asking about reads "Diesel". Stumbled across a good, clear image a little while ago.

On another note, here are almost 2,000 pictures of various C-Series fire trucks- http://www.flickr.com/groups/897982@N21/pool/

Edited by Chuck Most

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So never a factory option, but I ran across this and thought I'd put it in here for anyone looking for something different to do with a C cab. In the 1950s Ford offered a twin turbo marine engine based on the 534 Super Duty, thought it might be helpful for a restomod or what if turbo C cab.

http://hooniverse.com/2015/05/05/534ci-twin-turbo-super-seamaster-is-here-to-shame-your-gm-twin-six/

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One thing off about the article. The Seamaster engine was based on the 534, but it was not a Ford product. In all the literature I've been able to find, there's no mention of the Seamaster being sold directly through Ford. Seamaster also did a seafaring version of the Ford 300 six, as well as a non-turbocharged 534. I'm thinking of doing a crated twin turbo as a load for the flatbed version of the kit. 

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One thing off about the article. The Seamaster engine was based on the 534, but it was not a Ford product. In all the literature I've been able to find, there's no mention of the Seamaster being sold directly through Ford. Seamaster also did a seafaring version of the Ford 300 six, as well as a non-turbocharged 534. I'm thinking of doing a crated twin turbo as a load for the flatbed version of the kit. 

Weird, so what Seamaster just bought crate motors and worked them over into marine engines?

 

I was actually just looking for some photos of the 534 to detail one I'm working on when I found this. There are some good diagrams / photos and I thought seeing how the turbo plumbing was run might be handy if someone was looking to hotrod a C.

A flatbed hauling a couple of marine engines is a neat idea.

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A flatbed hauling a couple of marine engines is a neat idea.

Hmmm...

 

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Weird, so what Seamaster just bought crate motors and worked them over into marine engines?

 

I was actually just looking for some photos of the 534 to detail one I'm working on when I found this. There are some good diagrams / photos and I thought seeing how the turbo plumbing was run might be handy if someone was looking to hotrod a C.

A flatbed hauling a couple of marine engines is a neat idea.

That much I don't know. I'd imagine it would be a similar process to a GM-based Mercury Marine engine.

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So it appears that is the case for most marine engines then, they just buy industrial engines and modify them for marine use.

I found another bit that suggests the twin turbo wasn't offered until the early 1970s, not the 1950s as the linked article claims which makes sense, turbos would be pretty high tech for 1960. These were pretty high end engines, I found a blog on a boat rebuild and they had the paper work from when a prior owner installed a pair of these in the boat. In 1973 these ran $7500 each or around $35,000 adjusted for inflation.

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The Shell tanker appears to be a '58 thru '60, very similar to this 1/87 Heljan kit. What's nice about the AMT kit is it can be back dated to this period without any body work, just a  few mods to the headlights, door emblems and mirror design.

IMG_4944.JPG

Edited by leafsprings

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I don't think I have posted these here before. This is one that I want to build a model of.
http://stjordalsbilder.no/-/image/show/778255_shell-tankbil
 

http://stjordalsbilder.no/-/image/show/778244_hell-st-shell-tankbil
778244_h76cc0fb189b3c6d0938d_1024x1024.j

Any idea what the box behind the cab is? Fuel tank maybe?

 

This also reminds me of a story my dad has about growing up in Oregon. When you entered town you came down a narrow canyon, and at the bottom of the canyon there was a Shell station. He said it wasn't uncommon for the S to go out (maybe kids breaking it), so as you came down the hill at night you were welcomed a large red neon "hell". 

 

 

A straight 6 Cummins C 160 or C 180 was available in the mid 60's.

IMG_4921.JPG

Neat, I've not seen photos of this, and info on the C160/180 is hard to come by. It doesn't seem to have been one of Cummins more popular engines.

Ford also offered some Ford of England diesels, a 5.4 liter Dagenham (early 60s), and 5.9 liter Dorset (later 60s). Both were I-6 engines offered for the 600/700 series trucks. The Cummins was a 7.6 liter engine available for use in the heavier 800 series trucks.

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Any idea what the box behind the cab is? Fuel tank maybe?

 

This also reminds me of a story my dad has about growing up in Oregon. When you entered town you came down a narrow canyon, and at the bottom of the canyon there was a Shell station. He said it wasn't uncommon for the S to go out (maybe kids breaking it), so as you came down the hill at night you were welcomed a large red neon "hell".

I'm not sure what the box behind the cab is but maybe it could house a pump or tools? I think it looks to big to be a fueltank but I have not found much info on this truck so I don't really know anything.
The place where the photos are taken is a little north-east of Trondheim in the now city of Stjørdal. The place is called Hell and is a very popular tourist atraction. In the Travel channel program "Worlds greatest motocyclerides" the host goes trough Hell and meets the most beautiful woman on earth:
https://youtu.be/6U8DSrIEPPg?list=PLpmla1rUkQg4HDYQsgwgT1gBlzCl4E8lH

 

 

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Here's a '57 I found in a salvage yard a few years back.

 

IMG_66671-vi_zps539357b9.jpg

The '57 is the only single-headlight version not to have the removable wiper actuator access panels- those were added when the C-Series switched back to single headlights for 1961. The door scripts were also unique to '57 models.

That was a great junkyard! I took a bunch of photos there a couple of years before it closed.

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I'm not sure what the box behind the cab is but maybe it could house a pump or tools? I think it looks to big to be a fueltank but I have not found much info on this truck so I don't really know anything.The place where the photos are taken is a little north-east of Trondheim in the now city of Stjørdal. The place is called Hell and is a very popular tourist atraction. In the Travel channel program "Worlds greatest motocyclerides" the host goes trough Hell and meets the most beautiful woman on earth:
https://youtu.be/6U8DSrIEPPg?list=PLpmla1rUkQg4HDYQsgwgT1gBlzCl4E8lH

 

 

LP powered perhaps. LP was dabbled with quite a bit in the 60s.

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That was a great junkyard! I took a bunch of photos there a couple of years before it closed.

Quite a bit of it is still out there, but they're only open sporadically now. I don't get it... they paid Irv a ton of money for the property and contents, crushed everything to the tree line, tore down the old body shop, put up a new building and fence... and now they just let it sit. 

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Quite a bit of it is still out there, but they're only open sporadically now. I don't get it... they paid Irv a ton of money for the property and contents, crushed everything to the tree line, tore down the old body shop, put up a new building and fence... and now they just let it sit. 

I was under the impression it was all cleaned out. I guess I need to take a run up there.

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"2. The screens covered by a segmented bezel which fed air to the carb, located just behind the door handles on either side of the cab, are AWOL on the kit- this area is featureless on the kit cab. I'm guessing AMT did it to ease molding- break out the PE screen and Plastruct here."

 

Even a decal would have been enough to please me...

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And yet another idea for you C-series Ford:

Edited by Casey

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Cool. I already have a similar idea but I'm thinking of making a bucket-lift.

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jeez, you guys are really making me want to pick up the AMT C600 stakebed. How much of a pain is that kit? All I've heard about AMT is the horror stories of parts not even remotely fitting together, and things like 14 piece cab mirrors.

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I just built one. It didn't go together bad at all.  You have to be careful and test fit, but I didn't have to modify anything. The instructions are a little vague though.

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I just built one. It didn't go together bad at all.  You have to be careful and test fit, but I didn't have to modify anything. The instructions are a little vague though.

Seems to be worth picking up then. Now to decide on how I'm gonna build it.

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jeez, you guys are really making me want to pick up the AMT C600 stakebed. How much of a pain is that kit? All I've heard about AMT is the horror stories of parts not even remotely fitting together, and things like 14 piece cab mirrors.

If you can get your hands on a older issue, you will have fewer problems getting it together. I have built two of them (the C600 stake bed from ca 2004 and the C900 tractor from ca 2009) and had some fit issues here and there. As Dave says, test fit a lot. I also have an older isse of the C600 city delivery truck with NAPA livery on the box and that looks crisper and may have better partsfit.

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