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1964 Comet


ewetwo
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6 hours ago, Zippi said:

David, this was my 1st time using bmf.  While practicing I learnt quick that it only took the weight of my X-Acto knife (new blade) to cut through the bmf.  I also learnt very quickly that I need to wait til the afternoon when all the caffeine is out of my system.  I was shaking from the caffeine and I thought is was my nerves ☺ 

Mine isn't from caffeine. LOL. I usually do this in the late evening when it's dark and quiet. But I have bright lights on. A direct suspended over head light directly over my work area so it is bright enough. 

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Good lighting is important when doing BMF, but I like to use non direct lighting so there is no glare. I also paint the top edge of my knife blade a color that stands out from the body paint, like for this black car I would use red at the tip of the blade. 

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  • 1 month later...
On 6/7/2021 at 4:50 PM, ewetwo said:

Still in the purple pond. The paint doesn't seem to want to come off. Ugh!

Finally out of the purple pond. The 66 nova. Still in there. And I bought new Purple Power but boy. That Duplicolor black does not give up easily. 

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On 6/8/2021 at 3:11 PM, James2 said:

Good lighting is important when doing BMF, but I like to use non direct lighting so there is no glare. I also paint the top edge of my knife blade a color that stands out from the body paint, like for this black car I would use red at the tip of the blade. 

Bingo! I would recommend taking a red sharpie to the whole blade. As others have said, light pressure on the blade too. It is definitely one of my least favourite parts of building, but rewarding when done. 

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2 hours ago, Steve H said:

Bingo! I would recommend taking a red sharpie to the whole blade. As others have said, light pressure on the blade too. It is definitely one of my least favourite parts of building, but rewarding when done. 

Thank you all for the great advice. I appreciate it.

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  • 3 weeks later...

image1.thumb.jpeg.534a5888d5d2ba199b22218e2a53b2cf.jpegOK. After weeks of the Comet and the Nova soaking in the Purple Pond. I primed them and then sprayed the Duplicolor Black paint. Looked good. Then I sprayed the Duplicolor Clear Coat and they look like BLAH_BLAH_BLAH_BLAH. But I will build them and coat them in Pledge Revive which I always used. Done with clear coating. image2.thumb.jpeg.08874804ebe6c9aa6996d150220b6b79.jpeg

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OK. After weeks of the Comet and the Nova soaking in the Purple Pond. I primed them and then sprayed the Duplicolor Black paint. Looked good. Then I sprayed the Duplicolor Clear Coat and they look like BLAH_BLAH_BLAH_BLAH. But I will build them and coat them in Pledge Revive which I always used. Done with clear coating. image2.thumb.jpeg.08874804ebe6c9aa6996d150220b6b79.jpeg

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5 hours ago, ewetwo said:

OK. After weeks of the Comet and the Nova soaking in the Purple Pond. I primed them and then sprayed the Duplicolor Black paint. Looked good. Then I sprayed the Duplicolor Clear Coat and they look like BLAH_BLAH_BLAH_BLAH. But I will build them and coat them in Pledge Revive which I always used. Done with clear coating. image2.thumb.jpeg.08874804ebe6c9aa6996d150220b6b79.jpeg

It's a shame you're having problems with the Duplicolor on the Comet David.  That would make a nice model in black. How 'bout wet sanding out the body then another clear like my go to Rustoleum Auto Clear Acrylic Lacquer.  I very recently did that on a Chevelle build i'm in the process of and it came out just fine. In fact, I didn't even reclear it, just compounded and polished it out.Wasn't Duplicolor but it's worth a try.

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  • 3 weeks later...

After more than a month the black paint is off the Comet and the Nova. I'm wondering about my paint issues. I used Duplicolor primer and Duplicolor black paint. The black paint came off in sheets sort of. . Sign that the black must be lacquer. But is the Duplicator primer I am using meant for lacquer paint? When the paint peeled off then the primer started to just wash away?

Now with the foiling. In On the side chrome towards the back. The chrome trim separates and a thin chrome line splits from the top and runs back. Should I try putting a little strip of foil along that and then paint? There is not way I could ever foil that little strip.

 

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On 8/14/2021 at 9:53 AM, ewetwo said:

OK. After weeks of the Comet and the Nova soaking in the Purple Pond. I primed them and then sprayed the Duplicolor Black paint. Looked good. Then I sprayed the Duplicolor Clear Coat and they look like BLAH_BLAH_BLAH_BLAH. But I will build them and coat them in Pledge Revive which I always used. Done with clear coating. image2.thumb.jpeg.08874804ebe6c9aa6996d150220b6b79.jpeg

It's seeming that clear coating is becomming an issue with several on here.  I have only used two clear coatings in my last 5-6 years of modelling cars and those in only the last maybe 2 years.

The Rusto Acrylic Crystal clear and actual Future (an old bottle) I have. I still have occasional issues with the Rusto but if I don't get too heavy with the coats it comes out just fine. But, I only use acrylics (craft and Createx) so have no experience over any other paints.

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The problem is often that too many people have the impression that one coat of primer, one coat of paint and one coat of clear is all that's needed to get a beautiful paint job.

That might work with some paints, but in my experience, Duplicolor paint requires a little more attention.

First of all, the primer is a little hotter than many others, so light coats that get progressively heavier will work the best.

You will also want to remember that more coats of primer are better than fewer because with the hot automotive lacquer to follow, you will want as much protection from crazing as possible.

When putting on the color, several lighter coats are always better than 1 heavy one as well.

One heavy coat is much more likely to eat through the primer to the plastic and craze it than several light coats, plus, building the color will add more richness to the color itself, not to mention, avoid some weird striations in the metallic particles with metallic paints.

With Duplicolor clear, you will get much better results if you use several coats, followed by cutting and polishing.

Each successive coat of clear will give you a bit more shine than achieved with just the previous coat.

I use as many as 5 coats of clear, and then it still needs polishing to give a deep, rich shine.

 

Too often, I feel like people are in too much of a hurry to spend the time required to get an exceptional paint job.

Sometimes you have to put in the work if you want it to look like you "put in the work".

 

Another thing to remember with Duplicolor lacquers is that like most automotive lacquers, they are designed as "base coat/clear coat" paints.

In other words, they require clear for a gloss finish.

You can polish a solid color without clear, but I wouldn't try it with a metallic.

You are just as likely to end up with an irreparable mess than not.

 

 

 

 

Steve

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5 hours ago, ewetwo said:

After more than a month the black paint is off the Comet and the Nova. I'm wondering about my paint issues. I used Duplicolor primer and Duplicolor black paint. The black paint came off in sheets sort of. . Sign that the black must be lacquer. But is the Duplicator primer I am using meant for lacquer paint? When the paint peeled off then the primer started to just wash away.

 

Nothing wrong with the paint or primer in this instance.

That's exactly how it should react to Super Clean.

 

The lacquer paint itself will be entirely unaffected by the stripper.

Super Clean will only work in this circumstance by seeping it's way under the color and dissolving the primer.

This causes the paint to come off in sheets, and the primer to just wash off.

Perfectly natural and normal, and as a matter of fact, very desirable!

If you have to strip a lacquer paint job and you have used a primer that is unaffected by the solution, you're SOL with most of these products used for removing paint.

 

 

 

Steve

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By the way, just from looking at your above pictures David, it appears to me that if these photos were taken after clear coat, you were exactly on the right track.

It appears that the surface is fairly smooth, and with a few more light coats of clear and a little polishing you would have been exactly where you wanted to be.

 

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Steve

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OK. Thank you Steve. It was the first time using a clear coat. But I think it did craze the bodies a bit. I'll put several light coats of primer to see who they look then.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

5th attempt. 3 light coats or primer. 3 light coats of Duplicolor black paint. 2 light coats of Duplicolor clear cost. Why does it keep coming out looking so horrible? I can't figure out what it isn't smooth. I might have to resort to Rustoleum 2X gloss black.

image0-3.jpeg

image1.jpeg

Edited by ewetwo
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Looks like you're fairly close on this one. As Mr Guthmiller suggested, maybe a few more light coats of clear, let it cure out a few days, and then go at it with a polishing system. I wouldn't toss it in the stripper until I tried to polish it out, first.

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10 minutes ago, Bucky said:

Looks like you're fairly close on this one. As Mr Guthmiller suggested, maybe a few more light coats of clear, let it cure out a few days, and then go at it with a polishing system. I wouldn't toss it in the stripper until I tried to polish it out, first.

I've just never had one continuously come out so bad. 

That's for the info. I'll give it a try. Actually I did this over a week ago and was so discouraged with it I had to set it aside for a while. 

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From the look of it, you could be going too light with the clear. 
You’re getting more orange peel than what should be normally associated with Duplicolor clear.

I am going to tell you that you are not likely to get a super high gloss with Duplicolor clear, but if you’re spraying it light, you’re just piling orange peel upon orange peel.

Your clear coats should be sprayed pretty heavily so that it can level.

lacquer clear dries so quickly that if you spray it lightly, it will have a grainy look, and if subsequent coats are sprayed in the same way, it will not level, it will just add more graininess.

You probably need to go a lot heavier with the clear coats, and don’t worry too much about it getting too thick.

I usually spray around 5 pretty heavy coats of Duplicolor clear on my projects, and the product shrinks down to such a thin layer, that even with that many coats, it still doesn’t hide any detail.

Warm you clear coat can, spray it wet and you will likely be much happier with the smoothness of the finish.

Now, even with that said, you’re not going to get the type of high gloss as you would with something like a 2K clear.

If you want it to have a nice, smooth, shiny and “realistic” looking sheen, you are very likely going to have to polish at the end.

 

 

 

 

Steve

Edited by StevenGuthmiller
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I didn't see your comments until just now.

Steve. It wasn't orange peel looking. It looked like sandpaper. But the problem is the black paint looks like sandpaper after 3 light coats. 

Too late Carl.. It's in the soaker. Future in the future. LOL

 

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2 hours ago, ewetwo said:

I didn't see your comments until just now.

Steve. It wasn't orange peel looking. It looked like sandpaper. But the problem is the black paint looks like sandpaper after 3 light coats. 

Too late Carl.. It's in the soaker. Future in the future. LOL

 

You probably need to go heavier with the black too.

The black is lacquer as well, and just like the clear, it will get grainy if sprayed too lightly.

 

 

 

Steve

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I am by no means an expert at painting, in fact, that is the part of the build I hate the most.  That being said, to me it looks like you may be moving your spray can too quickly across the body or maybe you are too far away.  I have found that either of these problems will cause a sandpaper-like finish.  Any of the better painters have any thoughts on these observations?

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