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Remember the good old days ??????????


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I'm assuming I'm understanding this tread correctly, the good old days for me were the early 60's to early 70's cruising the streets of New Orleans between the 3 "Hot Rod" venues in my '57  Chevy and later in my SS Chevelle.. A literal car show and street racing every weekend.

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Yes "back in the day" we had a hangout called Skip's Fiesta Drive In and it was just like a car show every Friday and Saturday nights, and street racing every day, even on my way to work. Those were some really memorable great times, back in the 60's and early 70's.

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I'm a bit younger than a lot of you guys, so the good ol days for me were the late 90s into the early naughties. I was a keen skateboarder at the time and I worked every hour I could between october and april at any job I could get and usually more than one job. I did this so I could spend my summers travelling to skate all over the country and thanks to this I have friends from all over the world now. It was a lot of fun never knowing where I would be sleeping at night or where I was going to go next. I even had professional skaters travelling with me at times and some who have gone on to win at the x games and similar are still in contact with me. During this time I slept in some strange places, including multi story car parks, abandonned buildings, posh hotels, my car and under the ramps at parks. I really enjoyed this time of my life and looking back now theres not much I'd change about it

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Yeah we had the Varsity Drive In and it was the place to be on Friday and Saturday nights lots of girls and hot rods, plenty of cruising and racing man I had some fun times back then and even though the Varsity is long gone due to city progress we still have a local car show every Thursday weather permitting and usually there are 200-300 cars on a given afternoon and evening most of these guys are part of the old crowd from the 60s and early 70s, the memories flood back every time I attend!! 😀

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I remember the late 60’s some all the 70’s and was a young man in the 80’s. Life was good grandmother, my dad and mom was alive and we all was together and my brothers. Cool cars, great Television shows, fewer commercials and the commercials wasn’t as annoying remember was it mr Wipple don’t squeeze the Charmin and the little kid singing the Oscar Mayer song. There are so many things that are gone forever. Never would have thought about school shootings and what we have now.

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For me it was the mid 90s. Fresh out of high school, worked at a body shop by day, funeral home at night(driving the hearse through Taco Bell drive-thru was always fun) and still had time to play with cars. I drove a '55 Ford Tudor Sedan, '62 Ford Convertible 390/4spd car & sometimes the Model A. I owned no modern car back then. The weekend cruise-ins didn't look like a used car lot like they do today. No cell phone, had a pager for when I was on call at the funeral home. 

Also the car show swap meets-and there were a bunch still around back then, had actual car parts and not glassware & lawnmowers and clothes like you see at swaps today. Florida had 8 million less people back then, you could actually get around town or across the state. 

I have to say, I much prefer my Nikon D7500 over shooting film any day! Sometimes Modern Times ain't so bad. Sometimes.

Edited by RSchnell
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I was raised out in the country about 5 miles to the nearest small town called Haviland Ohio. Home of the Haviland tile works at that time. They had a larger general store called Fisher's market . It was ran by the Fisher Family until they retired in the early 1980's. They had almost anything even model kits! Penny candy, nickel candy , and regular candy. I remember going there quite often as a child. A 16 oz glass bottle of soda Such as Coca Cola was 15-20 cents and would have enough change to buy a Wayne Candies Maple Bun bar! all for about $.40 cents! The store is long gone along with the Landmark grainer and two gas stations. The Tile mill is now a plastic drainage company, and the biggest manf is custom assymbly. 

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3 hours ago, Snake45 said:

That's hard to imagine. And if it's true, I'm already sorry for them. :unsure:

 

Why not?  Each generation has its ups and downs.  We have it pretty good these days despite outbreaks and other issues.  I can see future generations, like the ones before, complaining about their world going to heck, and look back at an earlier era as being better.  The pattern repeats itself.

"The Good Old Days" is not a fixed point in time. It's not the '50s, '60s, or '70s.  In fact the phrase itself goes back into at least the early 1700s. 

https://www.wsj.com/articles/why-we-cant-stop-longing-for-the-good-old-days-11608958860

 

Also, note that the meme image at the start of this thread to me isn't particularly rosy itself.  I find it just slightly darkly humorous.

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On 5/21/2021 at 9:54 AM, Venom said:

The good ‘old days for some were miserable times for others and it’s still that way now.

Fact, not all of us had a rosy pink picture of America, I still have ptsd episodes of cops pointing guns at me for riding a bicycle on a sidewalk. 

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3 hours ago, Lownslow said:

Fact, not all of us had a rosy pink picture of America, I still have ptsd episodes of cops pointing guns at me for riding a bicycle on a sidewalk. 

That’s exactly the types of things I was thinking of... It should never have to be that way for anyone!

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10 hours ago, Lownslow said:

Fact, not all of us had a rosy pink picture of America, I still have ptsd episodes of cops pointing guns at me for riding a bicycle on a sidewalk. 

That’s just wrong and not the kind of men for the Job. I am from Chicago..

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I do have fond memories of many things of the 80s-90s... enjoyed the '00s quite a bit also.  Life has been interesting w/ ups and downs..looking forward to the remainder of the 20s.. 

Edited by Rob Hall
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The good old days are what you made of them...

I was reading a bit that a person who was born in 1906 lived through the Spanish Flu, World War I, the Great Depression, World War II, several recessions, Korean War,  Viet Nam War... and I know I forgot some!  I found this interesting since my grandparents were from this era.. they never spoke of their hardships. 

Except when my grandmother would say, “You kids would be whining if you were first on the breadline!”   The depression era reference was lost on us 1960s kids!

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3 minutes ago, Tom Geiger said:

The good old days are what you made of them...

I was reading a bit that a person who was born in 1906 lived through the Spanish Flu, World War I, the Great Depression, World War II, several recessions, Korean War,  Viet Nam War... and I know I forgot some!  I found this interesting since my grandparents were from this era.. they never spoke of their hardships. 

Except when my grandmother would say, “You kids would be whining if you were first on the breadline!”   The depression era reference was lost on us 1960s kids!

Tom, you brought to mind about my father who born in 1917 in rural Kentucky. They raised their food and the kids worked. He told me about the depression he never had to go to World War ll but my dad had a hard working life and he moved to Chicago and all of his kids had a better life. I was born in 65 and our talks ment so much. He was 48 when I was born and his move gave me a better life.

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My Dad was born in rural eastern Kentucky in 1921, my Mom there in 1931.. my Dad served in WW II in Miami and the Caribbean in the Army Air Corps.     After they met and married in '48, they moved to Ohio... I was born in '70, when my Dad was 49...he never talked much about the past, was always in the present, but I did get a few good stories of his youth.  Wish I had had more time with him as an adult (he passed in 1999). 

Edited by Rob Hall
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My grandfather’s father died young and left a family with six kids. My grandfather and his brother George left school to support the family, securing jobs on the railroad at 14 and 15. 

That association worked for them, both retired from Railway Express. He didn’t go to WWII because his work on the railroad was considered essential. 

My grandmother grew up at Ideal Beach at the NJ shore. She was one of six sisters. Her father was a builder and owned the local boarding house. During prohibition, he had the local speak easy.  The mob from the city came down to muscle him out of business. They overloaded all his supply into a truck, which didn’t make it out of town. The local police saw that he got his “grape juice” back and protected his operation.  He died in 1940.

My grandparents met at the shore. My grandfather and his best friend John stayed at the boarding house, met and married two of the sisters.  That foursome was inseparable for life. The sisters died exactly one week apart.

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I remember the old neighborhood that was built after WW2 and all the neighbors that bought homes and had kids at the same time. Everyone looked after each other and watched the kids. The mom’s and dad’s were everyone’s mom’s and dad’s.  I remember when my parents didn’t lock the house up when we went out for the day. I remember gas was 29.9 cents a gallon and $3.00 would fill a VW beetle only if it was almost bone dry. I remember the pledge of allegiance in school. I remember when everyone had respect for the president of our country no matter what party affiliation. I remember the end of my good old days when Jack Kennedy was killed and conspiracy theories flew. Resulting in the lack of respect for government and authority. 

This is strictly the version of my world growing up and I know other people had theirs that may counter mine. But all I can say is those were the good old days to me and they were happy ones.

 

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As a UK kid in the fifties, like Rick L, people living in he same street looked after one another and were everyone's mum and dad. My dad survived WW2, but try as I may he did not want to talk about it, as did many of that generation. My teens were in the Sixties. UK Pop and Fashion Culture literally exploded in the UK. Groups like the Beatles, Rolling Stones (still rolling) and Dave Clark Five became big world wide. Places like the Two I's Coffee Bar and the Marquee Club in London and of course the Cavern Club in Liverpool were the places to go. Mary Quant, Jean Shrimpton and Twiggy personified the fashion industry along with the boutiques in Carnaby Street at the time. England even won the World Cup in 1966! Heady days long gone but fondly remembered!

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