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When I started the thread about the truck, boat, and trailer, I had no idea that the truck would become a project in and of itself- originally I thought I would do a little weathering on the winch spools and cables, and try to paint over the Havoline logo and lettering, as well as removing the towing winch from the bed. I had also considered fabricating stone guards for the headlights- and then the headlights and auxiliary lights needed a little help- at least new lenses or maybe outright replacement. And then- and then- I decided to weather it after looking at lots of heavily used but still very able power wagons on the internet. OK, all right, what now? First was a complete disassembly- lots of little screws, and a lot of carefully loosened glue joints, and a few minor broken parts- the front winch broke where it joined the bumper, the spare tire post, and the seat mounting posts- all very fixable. But- there were those klunky door hinges- had to go! Speaking of go, I decided to drop in a hemi, decided on the one from the 53 Studebaker- mated to the power wagon's transmission and fed by 2 4bbl carbs. Another feature I wanted was a push out windshield which meant removing the windshield and back glass without damage, then filing down the windshield glass to fit the opening. I discovered that the die casting alloy was very hard when I went to cut off the door hinges, and when I ground away the screw bosses (the screw holes will be filled before painting). One reason for a complete disassembly was to completely remove the paint, so I started with the frame and fender casting chucked into my usual bath of oven cleaner. Three days later- not much! another 3 days- more, but not enough. So, I tried stripping the door skins in acetone and that did it- fast! I am now working on the cab, then comes the fender and frame assembly as well as the grille, hood, and bed (the bed bottom is plastic, so no acetone!) I also began thinking about door hinge design and came up with one using straight pins with wire wrapping them and the tails to be glued inside the door skin. the other part was cut and filed from brass channel, the inside width of which determined how many coils to wrap around the pin. Here's some pix, more soon.

big truck.jpeg

power wagon disassembly 1.jpg

disassembly 2.jpg

disassembly 3.jpg

power wagon windshield.jpg

stripped door skins.jpg

hemi progress.jpg

brass channel.jpg

hinge 1.jpg

hinge 2.jpg

hinge 3.jpg

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Your 46 Power Wagon is looking pretty good there Paul.  Looks like it came apart with not to much trouble.  I'll be watching this one.    

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Zippi, thanks for following- I think you will enjoy this! The main and auxiliary power trains are an almost vinyl plastic which is quite flexible- need to test the paint I use- might just spray with diluted white glue and use weathering powders- in this case ground pastel sticks and old makeup my wife donated to the cause- we shall see! One thing I have not figured out is how to remove the wheels and tires from the main drive train without breaking off the axle ends- one thing I want to try is rubbing the tires with pastel to dull them down- treads are already sanded.

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Had to rethink the hinges- didn't leave enough extra metal on the channel stock to bend a 90 degrees angle without distortion. For the other half of the hinge, the wire arms were too short and could not be secured to the inner door skin. Looking into the stash I discovered brass square tube that fit inside the channel, and some short copper tubes Betsy gave me from her jewelry stash. I will remove one side of the square and reduce its depth to match the inside depth of the channel. Now that I've thought out the process I just have to do it! Pix will follow when I have!

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The ends of the axles are ribbed so children can not pull wheel off. Carefully slit the stem on the back of the wheel and work the tire off the axle. When you put truck together you can use a small amount of a glue to hold stem on axle, you might want to clamp the split section to hold the glue in place.

Edited by ROY FERGUSON
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Roy, thanks for the info, but not sure what stem you are referring to. Could you send a pic or sketch? Removing the wheels and tires would make painting and weathering a lot easier!

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Roy, mine is an Ertl Collectibles 1/25th scale model. The wheels look completely different from your picture. Behind the brake plate you can just see a disc which I suspect is part of the securing mechanism. Very difficult to get at without gouging the brake plate or breaking the axle. Possibly I could get a thin blade between them and cut the axle, then glue them back together (not a fan of rolling wheels).

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The axle on the Ertl P/W extends into the brake plate and it (the end of the axle) Is split with a round nub on it.  When pushed into the brake plate it snaps in place and cannot be dislodged without cutting.  I tried squeezing the ends together with needle nose pliers to see if I could pull the axle free after I removed the tire but it would not budge.  You have to pry the tire off the rim.  After doing that the outside portion of the wheel will separate from the brake plate to expose the nub on the end of the axle.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Finally got all the metal parts stripped in acetone- must have also removed some filler because the hood pieces had some ugly short shots on a couple edges- have them puttied in, then sand and primer. Bed, grille/radiator, and chassis/fenders are in red oxide primer which will also be the start of the weathering. The blue will be the final color- in patches- but will be sanded and blended with the rusty places. Went back to my original hinge design- rough cut the last 3 brass channel pieces which will be attached to the cab- the problem with the first hinges was that the ends of the wire coils were too short to secure properly to the inside of the door skins. Cut the hinge slots in the passenger door as well. Got some slate blue craft paint for the seat and driver side arm rest- the arm rest was a weird magenta color- need a second coat to match the seat. I used some heat on the back and under side of the seat to add some denting. Discovered the wheels and brake back plates had enough room to get a razor saw between them so sawed them off- will make weathering the wheels, tires, and power train easier but I don't think the tires can be removed from the wheels without damage to both. Once done, the wheels and tires will be superglued to the axle ends, probably with alignment pins.

primered bed.jpg

primered chassis and fenders.jpg

primered grille and radiator.jpg

color.jpg

new door hinges.jpg

painted seat.jpg

arm rest.jpg

tires cut from axles.jpg

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  • 4 weeks later...

Earlier in this post I showed a method to create door hinges. The first experiment failed because the wire tails and brass tongues on the channel were too short. However, the method was still promising and I built new hinges with longer tails and tongues. They worked! Here are some pix of the results. I will post additional pix when I shoot a coat of primer.

doors open.jpg

doors closed.jpg

doors from back.jpg

doors open left rear.jpg

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They do work pretty good for a first try. I think the basic design is pretty sound but needs refining. Better bending and smaller stock will be next as well as buying stock in some superglue companies (not on this project), and I still want to look into eyeglass hinges (absolutely no pun intended there- yeah, right!) The idea is that paint will do a lot of covering up of the coiled wire. It will help that this will be a weathered model and the hinges will be a bit rusty. Next will be attaching the exhaust headers to the hemi and figuring out how to snake the exhaust pipes around the main and auxiliary drive trains- there will be vertical stacks through the running boards behind the cab. After that is worked out I will start on painting and weathering.

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